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Ron Maxwell

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By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | August 21, 2011
Nine years after borrowing $300,000 from Washington County, director Ron Maxwell still owes about $263,000 in principal and interest. Maxwell borrowed the money in 2002, after making the Civil War film “Gods and Generals” in the Tri-State area, including Washington County. The loan agreement gave Maxwell until 2005 to start working on another Civil War film, based on Jeff Shaara's book “The Last Full Measure,” and to produce at least half of it in Washington County. Otherwise, Maxwell would have to repay the money, with interest, by 2010.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | November 27, 2002
julieg@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - "Gods and Generals" director Ron Maxwell is helping to bring a little bit of Hollywood to Hagerstown next year with the film's Maryland premiere Feb. 11 at The Maryland Theatre. Local residents will have a chance to buy tickets, costing $65 to $130, to attend that premiere and the film's West Virginia premiere the next night at the Apollo Civic Theatre in Martinsburg, W.Va., organizers announced Tuesday morning at The Maryland Theatre.
NEWS
April 11, 2006
It seemed like a good deal at the time, loaning $300,000 to a film-maker who wanted to do the third leg of his Civil War trilogy here, It was October 2002 and director Ron Maxwell had finally completed filming of his epic Civil War film, "Gods and Generals. " With the help of a previous county loan, that production brought plenty of money into Washington County, as services were purchased, vacant buildings were leased to build sets and hotel rooms were filled with cast and crew members.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 19, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY-Washington County has received another loan payment from director Ron Maxwell, a week after county officials said he had stopped paying. The county received $20,000 from Maxwell on Thursday, County Attorney John Martirano said. The payment is Maxwell's third toward a $300,000 county loan in 2002 to help him film a Civil War movie called "The Last Full Measure. " Because he didn't make the movie within three years, Maxwell had to repay the loan. At 4.5 percent interest, Maxwell must pay back a total of about $340,000, according to Martirano.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
In November 2002, the Washington County Commissioners voted 4-1 to offer director Ron Maxwell a $300,000 loan if he would film his third Civil War movie here. The vote, with Commissioner William Wivell opposed, was taken just before the opening of Maxwell's "Gods and Generals," which did not do well at the box office. Commissioners President Greg Snook said then that production had generated $10 million for the county's economy and that the next film would be even more lucrative.
NEWS
December 7, 2007
Editor's Note: Each Friday, Herald-Mail reporters and editors will answer some of the questions that are called in by readers to Mail Call. Consider this us returning your call. Has county been repaid for movie? Q. "To the county finance director and the Washington County Commissioners: Has the movie company totally repaid all the money they loaned to them? I think the County Commissioners should answer this in the paper. After all, it's taxpayers' dollars.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | February 7, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com Hagerstown resident Chris Utterback opened up his copy of the newly released soundtrack from the movie "Gods and Generals" Tuesday and was shocked to see his own picture looking back at him from the inside cover. "At least I thought it was me but I wanted to be sure," Utterback said from his South Pointe home Thursday, two days after Warner Bros. released the soundtrack. The Civil War movie, which was directed by Ron Maxwell, will have its Washington County premiere Tuesday at The Maryland Theatre, and is scheduled for wide release Feb. 21. Utterback checked all the details of the picture to be sure it was him. "I had volunteered to carry a flag in a couple of scenes and I was also carrying a white haversack like in the picture," he said.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | July 3, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Local Civil War expert Dennis Frye isn't sure if he'll attend the 18th annual Salute to Independence at Antietam National Battlefield. If he does, he'll make a point - as he has every other time he's been there - of walking down to the Maryland Symphony Orchestra stage and turning around to look at the audience. Looking back on the throng of some 30,000 people is a way for Frye to get some perspective on the battle fought on that ground in 1862.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | July 6, 2003
gregs@herald-mail.com By 4 p.m. Saturday, Antietam National Battlefield looked like a gold-rush town, with tarps, tents and blankets claiming real estate over the landscape. By evening, the landscape was covered with tens of thousands of people who had come to hear the Maryland Symphony Orchestra and watch the annual fireworks over the battlefield. "We got here about 2 o'clock. When we got here, a lot of tarps were staked down," said Barbara Commander, 42, of Woodstock, Md. "It was tarps all over the place," said Commander's daughter, Elizabeth, 20. "We love the history.
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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | August 21, 2011
Nine years after borrowing $300,000 from Washington County, director Ron Maxwell still owes about $263,000 in principal and interest. Maxwell borrowed the money in 2002, after making the Civil War film “Gods and Generals” in the Tri-State area, including Washington County. The loan agreement gave Maxwell until 2005 to start working on another Civil War film, based on Jeff Shaara's book “The Last Full Measure,” and to produce at least half of it in Washington County. Otherwise, Maxwell would have to repay the money, with interest, by 2010.
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NEWS
December 7, 2007
Editor's Note: Each Friday, Herald-Mail reporters and editors will answer some of the questions that are called in by readers to Mail Call. Consider this us returning your call. Has county been repaid for movie? Q. "To the county finance director and the Washington County Commissioners: Has the movie company totally repaid all the money they loaned to them? I think the County Commissioners should answer this in the paper. After all, it's taxpayers' dollars.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 19, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY-Washington County has received another loan payment from director Ron Maxwell, a week after county officials said he had stopped paying. The county received $20,000 from Maxwell on Thursday, County Attorney John Martirano said. The payment is Maxwell's third toward a $300,000 county loan in 2002 to help him film a Civil War movie called "The Last Full Measure. " Because he didn't make the movie within three years, Maxwell had to repay the loan. At 4.5 percent interest, Maxwell must pay back a total of about $340,000, according to Martirano.
NEWS
April 11, 2006
It seemed like a good deal at the time, loaning $300,000 to a film-maker who wanted to do the third leg of his Civil War trilogy here, It was October 2002 and director Ron Maxwell had finally completed filming of his epic Civil War film, "Gods and Generals. " With the help of a previous county loan, that production brought plenty of money into Washington County, as services were purchased, vacant buildings were leased to build sets and hotel rooms were filled with cast and crew members.
NEWS
January 13, 2006
In November 2002, the Washington County Commissioners voted 4-1 to offer director Ron Maxwell a $300,000 loan if he would film his third Civil War movie here. The vote, with Commissioner William Wivell opposed, was taken just before the opening of Maxwell's "Gods and Generals," which did not do well at the box office. Commissioners President Greg Snook said then that production had generated $10 million for the county's economy and that the next film would be even more lucrative.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 12, 2006
HAGERSTOWN tarar@herald-mail.com Washington County plans to ask director Ron Maxwell to repay $300,000 the County Commissioners loaned him to shoot a Civil War movie in the county, Commissioners President Gregory I. Snook said Wednesday. Commissioners Vice President William J. Wivell, who opposed loaning the money to Maxwell, doubted the county would be paid back. "I think it'll be a bad debt write-off," Wivell said by phone Wednesday. "I don't think we're going to get anything out of it. " Snook and Maryland Film Office Director Jack Gerbes said they didn't know whether "The Last Full Measure" would be made.
NEWS
by RYAN C. TUCK | July 30, 2004
ryant@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Despite the box office failure of Ted Turner's "Gods and Generals," director/screenwriter Ron Maxwell said he "fully intends" to adapt "The Last Full Measure," the final book in the series that includes the films "Gettysburg" and its prequel, "Gods and Generals. " "The Last Full Measure" is the third and final book in the series of novels by Michael Shaara and his son Jeff Shaara. It follows the action after Gettysburg to the Battle of the Wilderness, the siege of Petersburg and ends with the surrender at Appomattox Court House.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | July 6, 2003
gregs@herald-mail.com By 4 p.m. Saturday, Antietam National Battlefield looked like a gold-rush town, with tarps, tents and blankets claiming real estate over the landscape. By evening, the landscape was covered with tens of thousands of people who had come to hear the Maryland Symphony Orchestra and watch the annual fireworks over the battlefield. "We got here about 2 o'clock. When we got here, a lot of tarps were staked down," said Barbara Commander, 42, of Woodstock, Md. "It was tarps all over the place," said Commander's daughter, Elizabeth, 20. "We love the history.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | July 3, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Local Civil War expert Dennis Frye isn't sure if he'll attend the 18th annual Salute to Independence at Antietam National Battlefield. If he does, he'll make a point - as he has every other time he's been there - of walking down to the Maryland Symphony Orchestra stage and turning around to look at the audience. Looking back on the throng of some 30,000 people is a way for Frye to get some perspective on the battle fought on that ground in 1862.
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