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Response Time

NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | August 30, 2002
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Officers with the Berkeley County Sheriffs Department are trying to resurrect their K-9 program, and are starting by seeking $50,000 in state money to buy two dogs, a car and other equipment. When officers need assistance from a K-9 now, they must call either the Martinsburg Police Department or a deputy reserve officer with a bloodhound. Having their own dog could cut down on response time, and also prevent other dogs from being overworked, said sheriffs department Chief Deputy Kenneth Lemaster.
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NEWS
February 3, 1998
By AMY WALLAUER Staff Writer, Martinsburg CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - An enhanced 911 system would provide emergency service dispatchers with exact addresses and telephone numbers for 911 calls and shave two to three minutes off response times, a Motorola consultant told Jefferson County residents Tuesday night. About 30 people attended the public hearing to inform residents about enhanced 911, which is expected to be operational in Jefferson County by mid-1999 if the County Commission approves the ordinance.
NEWS
by KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | July 20, 2002
kimy@herald-mail.com In an effort to reduce response times in the West End of Hagerstown, Community Rescue Service has begun operating an ambulance out of Antietam Fire Co. on a trial basis. CRS Chief Chris Amos said Friday that an ambulance and a crew will work out of the station on Summit Avenue daily from 2 to 7 p.m. The service began Thursday, he said. Typically, it takes an ambulance 9 to 10 minutes to reach calls in the West End from CRS' base on Eastern Boulevard, Amos said.
NEWS
March 13, 2001
Bill to limit public access to 911 tapes is irrational Prompted by a desire to limit radio and TV broadcasters' use of audio tracks from 911 calls, the West Virginia Senate is pushing a bill to keep such calls confidential unless a judge orders their release. It's a ridiculous attempt to fix a system that isn't broken and should be opposed by all who care about the free flow of information. The bill originated in the Senate Juiciary Committee last Thursday and is being fast-tracked so that it could come to the floor as soon as this week.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | March 19, 2009
ANNAPOLIS -- Current practice would allow anyone with a working vehicle to transport a dead body to the state medical examiner in the trunk of their car, according to Tom Wetzel, who owns a Hagerstown body transport company. Wetzel testified Thursday before a House of Delegates committee in favor of legislation introduced by Del. LeRoy E. Myers Jr., R-Allegany/Washington, that would ensure more regulation of body transportation services. Under Myers' bills, the Secretary of Health and Mental Hygiene would have to adopt regulations that require a body transportation service to transport a body in a way that shows the deceased person proper dignity.
NEWS
June 12, 1997
Employee residency rules to ease on Oct. 1 City of Hagerstown employees will no longer have to live in Maryland starting Oct. 1, although some city officials don't agree like the idea. City officials said they would approve a new residency requirement that doesn't address general city employees, but that continues to direct that the city administrator and newly hired department managers must live in the city. Legislators approved a law last spring that will allow local government employees to live outside Maryland.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE, Waynesboro | March 17, 2000
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Increasing runs to the Greencastle-Antrim area are prompting Medic II, the advanced life-support unit based at Waynesboro Hospital, to staff a paramedic and emergency vehicle at the Rescue Hose Co. No. 1 firehouse, Medic II's operations chief said Thursday. Brian Mitchell said 30 percent of Medic II's calls go to the Greencastle area, 10 miles east of Waynesboro, and beyond. The unit's four emergency vehicles, staffed with 22 full- and part-time paramedics and registered nurses, respond to about 1,800 emergencies a year, all in southern Franklin County.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | April 29, 2010
BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, Pa. -- The Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors have applied for a grant that would help them acquire land believed to have been part of the Battle of Monterey Pass during the Civil War. The application paperwork described the property as the site of Gen. George Custer's battlefield line at 3 a.m. July 5, 1863. Historian John Miller has described the battle, the second-largest in Pennsylvania, as confusing due to poor weather and terrain. An interesting aspect of the battle is that it was fought on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line, he said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 11, 2010
PLEASANT VALLEY -- Southern Washington County residents gathered Monday to hear officials make their case for a new communications tower in the Sandy Hook area. County officials have said a 190-foot tower would fill a wide communication gap that leaves firefighters, emergency medical service workers and police officers vulnerable. Some residents and environmentalists were skeptical, alleging that the tower would be an eyesore in an area known for beautiful views. About 75 people attended Monday's public meeting at Pleasant Valley Elementary School.
NEWS
March 23, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- If you, a relative or a friend is in some type of care facility and has a problem, where can you turn? Locally, the Washington County Commission on Aging has an ombudsman who visits nursing homes when there are complaints about the facilities, said Linda Crone, who deals with community-based programs at the Commission on Aging. Senior citizens or their family members also can call the ombudsman for information about problems at local nursing homes, Crone said.
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