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NEWS
February 5, 2005
Charlie Stokes, 15, a ninth-grader from Waynesboro, Pa., participated Friday in the St. Maria Goretti High School National Honor Society's fund-raiser for St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital at Long Meadow Bowl in Hagerstown.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | April 9, 2012
The Save Historic Antietam Foundation will help fund research by Civil War scholars about the Army of the Potomac and about Clara Barton's work during the Battle of Antietam, the organization announced in a press release. The foundation awarded its first Dr. Joseph L. Harsh Memorial Scholarship to Daniel Joseph Vermilya of Kirtland, Ohio, for research on the topic of “The Strength, Composition, and Experience of the Army of the Potomac at the battle of Antietam,” foundation President Tom Clemens said.
NEWS
Linda Irvin-Craig | August 23, 2013
As someone who suffered through grade-school penmanship exercises, the recent discussion about discontinuing the teaching of cursive writing in our schools evoked mixed emotions. Those interminable oval tracings and slanted up-and-down squiggles filled pages of lined notebook paper and produced hand cramps long remembered. Yet, as a devotee of history, I can attest that not knowing how to decipher the scribes of yesteryear would block comprehensive access to original documents. Local research could be stymied and full appreciation of important written creations such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, through which this country was founded, would be lost.
EDUCATION
January 2, 2011
In a recent poster session at Lock Haven University, students shared their research on Pennsylvania's many unique, regional histories. The Dec. 14 poster session, titled "Pennsylvania's Histories," showcased the work of students who have been studying Pennsylvania history this semester. "The idea was for students to research a region in Pennsylvania and identify what historically made that part of Pennsylvania different or unique," said Professor Janet Irons. "Pennsylvania has many histories, not just one, because the regions within its borders are so distinct.
NEWS
July 22, 2012
The George Tyler Moore Center for the Study of the Civil War at Shepherd University will present “Mountaineers Unite?: Cross-Border Enlistments and the Civil War in West Virginia” by Scott A. MacKenzie on July 30 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium of Erma Ora Byrd Hall on the Shepherd University campus. MacKenzie is the center's 2012 George M. Nethken Graduate Fellow. The presentation is free and open to the public. MacKenzie, a student of Kenneth W. Noe at Auburn University in Alabama, has spent eight weeks in the area conducting research for his Ph.D.
NEWS
February 7, 2011
I recently read an article by Rick Jordahl, associate editor of Pork Magazine, titled “U.S. Ag Research In Decline.” He goes through the history of the land-grant university system, which helped to propel the U.S. into its role as the world’s leading food producer. Regular readers of this column have heard me espouse the virtues of this brilliant model on more than one occasion. Jordahl goes on to point out that lawmakers no longer see a need for them to invest in this research in light of the fact that Americans spend less of their disposable income on food than any other people in the world.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 29, 2010
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Craig Higgins of Big Pool said his family, for decades, knew frustratingly little about his uncle's death in World War II. Then, Higgins dug in and uncovered reams of information about the military service of Russell L. Higgins, who was 32 years old when he died in France in 1944. Craig Higgins now has a binder filled with copies of pictures, maps, documents and news clippings, creating a clear, thorough story. "This book of research is in tribute to Uncle Russell L. Higgins and all the veterans of WWII," Craig Higgins, 48, wrote on an introductory page.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | April 6, 2012
There are no pink ribbons, no T-shirts or logos encouraging awareness and prevention. Instead, it's a topic many people find difficult to discuss. And unless you are a parent who has lost a child to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), it is impossible to understand the level of pain. One minute your child is alive. The next, he or she is gone. The syndrome is exactly what it says - the sudden, unexpected death of a baby under the age of one that occurs while the infant is thought to be sleeping.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | December 3, 2008
Stephen Budiansky, author of "The Bloody Shirt: Terror After Appomattox," has penned more than 10 books over the years. Yet he said he's not the type of writer to rise at dawn every morning to pound out a thousand words before lunch. When writing nonfiction - specifically military history - Budianksy said the first step is always research. "I start with a lot of background," he said in a telephone interview from his Leesburg, Va., home. For "The Bloody Shirt," Budiansky poured over newspaper accounts and original documents at several locations, including Mississippi State University, South Carolina State Archive, Duke University and the University of Virginia.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
The second annual Walk with Tori to benefit scleroderma research will be Sunday at Doub's Woods Park in Hagerstown. Registration begins at 1 p.m. with the 2K walk (1.24 miles) to begin at 3. Each participant who makes a donation of $25 or more will receive a “Walk with Tori” T-shirt. There will be a silent auction, raffles and entertainment after the walk. Last year's inaugural event raised more than $46,000 for the University of Pittsburgh Scleroderma Center. For more information, call 717-597-9200.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | September 8, 2013
Led by people suffering from scleroderma, a few hundred people stepped out Sunday afternoon for the third annual Walk with Tori, and among them was Bryant Davis. “I couldn't help my mom when I was 9 years old, so I figure I can help someone now,” said Davis, whose mother Patricia died of the disease in 1963. Toward that end, the Bunker Hill, W.Va., man already held a private fundraiser through which family and friends raised about $1,600. The theme, he said, was “Remembering 50 Years Ago,” with a scavenger hunt and trivia contest related to the year his mother died.
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NEWS
By ALICIA NOTARIANNI | alnotarianni@aol.com | September 7, 2013
Heather Elliott said her late husband had struggled with depression. Over the years, she said, in his darkest times, he had spoken of suicide. She listened to him, tried to support him, encouraged him to get professional help. Still, not yet two weeks ago, on Aug. 27, her worst nightmare became a reality when he took his own life. Soon after, Elliott, 25, of Hagerstown saw an ad in the newspaper for the Out of the Darkness Community Walk. Hosted by the Maryland chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, the event aimed to raise awareness of suicide, help prevent it and provide support for survivors - meaning family members who have lost loved ones to it. Elliott and her two young sons participated in the event Saturday morning at City Park in Hagerstown.
NEWS
Linda Irvin-Craig | August 23, 2013
As someone who suffered through grade-school penmanship exercises, the recent discussion about discontinuing the teaching of cursive writing in our schools evoked mixed emotions. Those interminable oval tracings and slanted up-and-down squiggles filled pages of lined notebook paper and produced hand cramps long remembered. Yet, as a devotee of history, I can attest that not knowing how to decipher the scribes of yesteryear would block comprehensive access to original documents. Local research could be stymied and full appreciation of important written creations such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, through which this country was founded, would be lost.
NEWS
Lisa Prejean | August 22, 2013
“NOTICE: YOUR DRIVER'S LICENSE IS DUE FOR RENEWAL PRIOR TO THE EXPIRATION DATE SHOWN ABOVE. FOR TIPS ON EASY RENEWAL, SEE THE ENCLOSED BROCHURE.” That is not exactly a message anyone wants to receive about a week before school starts. This is an especially busy time. Who wants to deal with the Motor Vehicle Administration at any time of year ... but especially now? And does the notice have to be in all caps? Is shouting necessary? Just seeing one of those brown envelopes from the MVA is enough to grab most people's attention.
NEWS
August 12, 2013
Funkstown Mayor Paul N. Crampton Jr. said Monday night that the town will continue to research a possible noise ordinance, but problems at a local restaurant and bar that prompted the proposal have diminished. Crampton's comments came after a mayor and Funkstown Town Council meeting. Washington County Sheriff Douglas W. Mullendore had contacted town officials to express concerns about the ability for deputies to enforce the noise and loitering proposals. Mullendore recommended that the town contact Maryland officials about the state's Environmental Noise Act of 1974.
NEWS
August 12, 2013
The Maryland Department of Agriculture and University of Maryland Extension will offer a one-day course titled “Practical Experiences in Nutrient Management” Thursday, Sept. 12, at the University of Maryland's Western Maryland Research and Education Center in Keedysville. Topics include plan writing for perennial fruit operations, calibrating manure spreaders, soil nitrate testing, the new Phosphorus Management Tool, yield checks for corn grail and silage and features of NuMan Pro 4.0. The fee is $20 per person and covers learning materials, morning break and lunch.
LIFESTYLE
By TERESA DUNHAM CAVAGNARO | Special to The Herald-Mail | June 13, 2013
Change the diaper. Feed the baby. Burp. Hold. Sleepy time. After babies are born, fussing often is a way of communicating some basic needs.  When they get a little older, it's not always that simple. Babies can point, or they can make some more insistent noise, but they might not get the message across every time. Then, when they do start talking, some of the words come out like gibberish. For Donna Day, 50, who reads lips and uses a hearing aid, she was uncertain how she would communicate with her grandchildren when they came into the world.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
The American Cancer Society Relay for Life held over the weekend in Berkeley County, W.Va., continued its tradition of youth involvement. All the Berkeley County schools participated in some way, and many were represented during the actual event, which started at noon Saturday and ended at 6 a.m. Sunday, according to Kim Dellinger, one of the co-chairs. This year's Berkeley County Relay for Life raised $231,000 toward its $270,000 goal. Fundraising continues through Aug. 31. “We want to fight this,” Dellinger said, adding that money raised supports cancer research.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
Lebanon Valley College's Inquiry 2013 coincided with the Council for Undergraduate Research's celebration of student research and achievement from April 14 to 20. Jared A. Hamilton of Shippensburg, Pa., was among the 185 student participants. Hamilton, a senior business administration major, presented “Comparing a German and an American SUV - The case of the 2012 Jeep Wrangler and 2012 Mercedes G550.” Hamilton is a graduate of Shippensburg Area High School. Andrew D. Suprock of Mount Airy, Md., also participated.
LIFESTYLE
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | crystal.schelle@herald-mail.com | May 5, 2013
Catie Breslin is living proof there have been advances in cystic fibrosis research. When she was born, the average age a person with CF expected to live was age 18. Today, it's 37. That's why the 21-year-old Hagerstown native is hoping that people will dig into their pockets for the chance to sweat for the Zumbathon for Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. The event is from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, May 18, at St. Mary's Catholic School in Hagerstown. According to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, CF is an inherited, chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system of about 30,000 children and adults in the U.S. and 70,000 worldwide.
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