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NEWS
by BRIAN SHAPPELL | March 11, 2004
shappell@herald-mail.com Several members of the Washington County religious community said this week they are not sold on "The Passion of the Christ" as a spark behind recent attendance increases, but rather believed more people come to churches every year at this time. Still, many of the those same religious leaders said they have noticed a lot of conversation among some parishioners as a result of the Mel Gibson film. Father Chris Moore, of St. Joseph Catholic Church in Hagerstown, and the Rev. Ken Hawes, of Emmanuel United Methodist Church in Hagerstown, said they believe any attendance increases at those churches have been because of the start of Lent, the period from Ash Wednesday through Holy Saturday, the day before Easter.
NEWS
February 19, 1998
By BRENDAN KIRBY Staff Writer As the United States prepares for air strikes against Iraq, four Washington County religious leaders plan to pray for peace in the Middle East. The Clinton administration has threatened to bomb Iraq if the nation does not comply with a U.N. resolution demanding access to possible chemical and biological weapons sites. That has sparked concern among area ministers. David Buchenroth, senior pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church, said his church will host the vigil next Thursday from noon to 1 p.m. Buchenroth, who is also leads the Washington County Council of Churches, said the organization discussed the issue on Wednesday.
OPINION
April 7, 2011
Members of LGBTQ community deserve respect To the editor: It is a sad day in our society when some people in our local community are still using discriminatory and racist language when it comes to considering the LGBTQ community as a culture or subculture in our community. The LGBTQ community does exist in Hagerstown and Washington County. We are a big group in this community and we support this community in many ways. I apologize to all citizens of Washington County for a few citizens who cannot accept that we are in the community.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | January 1, 2008
SMITHSBURG - The Smithsburg Area Churches Association will hold a community memorial service on Jan. 7 at 7 p.m. for Smithsburg Police Officer Christopher Shane Nicholson, who was killed in the line of duty on Dec. 19. The service will be open to the public and will be held at Smithsburg High School. Smithsburg Mayor Mildred "Mickey" Myers and Smithsburg Police Chief Charles Stanford are expected to deliver eulogies. "We want to give the public an opportunity to offer their condolences and heal together during this terribly difficult time," said Pastor Gerry Johnson of Trinity Lutheran Church in Smithsburg.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 8, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT -- As a new school year begins, Old Forge Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Eddie Waldron is praying for wisdom. Tenth-grader Elizabeth Stroud is praying for peace and unity among students. Maryland State Police Trooper Travis Brown is praying for an "encampment of angels" around schools and school buses. And Washington County Public Schools Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan is praying for the vision for educators to see students' needs and the strength to take action on students' behalf.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) -- The government turned up the pressure Tuesday on the head of a small Florida church who plans to burn copies of the Quran on Sept. 11, warning him that doing so could endanger U.S. troops and Americans everywhere. But the Rev. Terry Jones insisted he would go ahead with his plans, despite criticism from the top U.S. general in Afghanistan, the White House and the State Department, as well as a host of religious leaders. Jones, who is known for posting signs proclaiming that Islam is the devil's religion, says the Constitution gives him the right to publicly set fire to the book that Muslims consider the word of God. Gen. David Petraeus warned Tuesday in an e-mail to The Associated Press that "images of the burning of a Quran would undoubtedly be used by extremists in Afghanistan -- and around the world -- to inflame public opinion and incite violence.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | August 24, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - In her encounters with people across the country, Rebecca Glenn said she has met quite a few Christians uncomfortable with the attitudes of the people at the podiums. Many of them will not stay, said Glenn, who has learned "that a lot of people walked away from the church because they haven't gotten the message of love. " Glenn said Wednesday that she wants to introduce people to a religious approach that embraces many viewpoints and emphasizes love, and she and a small group of Christians - most from the Phoenix area - are using their feet to carry the message.
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Beginning at 5:10 a.m. on March 26 at Pen Mar Park and finishing at 9:50 p.m. in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., the Rev. Ed Poling hiked across Maryland, completing more than 40 miles of the Appalachian Trail in 17 hours.  Poling, pastor of Hagerstown Church of the Brethren, had fellow hikers to keep him company part of the way, some of whom hiked the entire 40 miles and others hiked a leg of the journey or nearly half the distance.  The hike wasn't...
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | January 8, 2008
SMITHSBURG - It is normal, The Rev. Julie Brigham said, for responders to a tragedy to be haunted by strobe-like images that continue through the aftermath and beyond. It is normal, she said, for friends and family to feel they're trapped in someone else's nightmare life. It is normal to want "closure," and to long to wake up and find it was all a dream. But at a memorial service intended to facilitate healing for a town still coming to grips with the Dec. 19 slaying of Smithsburg Police Officer Christopher Nicholson, leaders told a packed auditorium that healing was to be found not through closure, but through memory and honor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 11, 2012
Beginning at 5:10 a.m. on March 26 at Pen Mar Park and finishing at 9:50 p.m. in Harpers Ferry, W.Va., the Rev. Ed Poling hiked across Maryland, completing more than 40 miles of the Appalachian Trail in 17 hours.  Poling, pastor of Hagerstown Church of the Brethren, had fellow hikers to keep him company part of the way, some of whom hiked the entire 40 miles and others hiked a leg of the journey or nearly half the distance.  The hike wasn't...
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OPINION
July 22, 2011
“I'm just commenting on all of these Mail Calls on the mo-peds. I'm a 77-year-old man. I own a mo-ped, and I try not to hold up traffic, but these people who keep complaining about these mo-peds, they should live in India or Germany or Greece or Italy, where mo-peds are on the road 24/7. Time to stop talking about the mo-peds and the scooters.” - North End, Hagerstown “I'm getting tired of seeing President Obama on TV. I thought he'd make a good president, being a constitutional lawyer, a teacher.
OPINION
April 7, 2011
Members of LGBTQ community deserve respect To the editor: It is a sad day in our society when some people in our local community are still using discriminatory and racist language when it comes to considering the LGBTQ community as a culture or subculture in our community. The LGBTQ community does exist in Hagerstown and Washington County. We are a big group in this community and we support this community in many ways. I apologize to all citizens of Washington County for a few citizens who cannot accept that we are in the community.
NEWS
September 7, 2010
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) -- The government turned up the pressure Tuesday on the head of a small Florida church who plans to burn copies of the Quran on Sept. 11, warning him that doing so could endanger U.S. troops and Americans everywhere. But the Rev. Terry Jones insisted he would go ahead with his plans, despite criticism from the top U.S. general in Afghanistan, the White House and the State Department, as well as a host of religious leaders. Jones, who is known for posting signs proclaiming that Islam is the devil's religion, says the Constitution gives him the right to publicly set fire to the book that Muslims consider the word of God. Gen. David Petraeus warned Tuesday in an e-mail to The Associated Press that "images of the burning of a Quran would undoubtedly be used by extremists in Afghanistan -- and around the world -- to inflame public opinion and incite violence.
NEWS
February 19, 2009
"In May, stamps are going up to 44 cents. The postmaster general makes $800,000 a year. Who's hurting?" - Clear Spring "To Gov. O'Malley: Let's keep the death penalty. You say it doesn't work, but it doesn't work if you don't use it. If you start using it, that'll send a message. " - Sharpsburg "I am so proud of our new attorney general, Eric Holder, who finally told it like it was, when he said we were a nation of cowards. " - Shepherdstown, W.Va.
NEWS
By TERRY MATTINGLY / Scripps Howard News Service | November 2, 2008
BERKELEY, Calif. - The interfaith coalition that formed in the 1990s to lobby for religious liberty in China was so large and so diverse that even the New York Times noticed it. One petition included two Catholic cardinals and a dozen bishops, Evangelical broadcasters, Eastern Orthodox bishops, Muslims, Tibetan Buddhists, Baha'is, Orthodox and liberal rabbis, Scientologists and Protestant clergy of a various and sundry races and traditions....
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 8, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT -- As a new school year begins, Old Forge Elementary School fifth-grade teacher Eddie Waldron is praying for wisdom. Tenth-grader Elizabeth Stroud is praying for peace and unity among students. Maryland State Police Trooper Travis Brown is praying for an "encampment of angels" around schools and school buses. And Washington County Public Schools Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan is praying for the vision for educators to see students' needs and the strength to take action on students' behalf.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | January 8, 2008
SMITHSBURG - It is normal, The Rev. Julie Brigham said, for responders to a tragedy to be haunted by strobe-like images that continue through the aftermath and beyond. It is normal, she said, for friends and family to feel they're trapped in someone else's nightmare life. It is normal to want "closure," and to long to wake up and find it was all a dream. But at a memorial service intended to facilitate healing for a town still coming to grips with the Dec. 19 slaying of Smithsburg Police Officer Christopher Nicholson, leaders told a packed auditorium that healing was to be found not through closure, but through memory and honor.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | January 1, 2008
SMITHSBURG - The Smithsburg Area Churches Association will hold a community memorial service on Jan. 7 at 7 p.m. for Smithsburg Police Officer Christopher Shane Nicholson, who was killed in the line of duty on Dec. 19. The service will be open to the public and will be held at Smithsburg High School. Smithsburg Mayor Mildred "Mickey" Myers and Smithsburg Police Chief Charles Stanford are expected to deliver eulogies. "We want to give the public an opportunity to offer their condolences and heal together during this terribly difficult time," said Pastor Gerry Johnson of Trinity Lutheran Church in Smithsburg.
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