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NEWS
September 3, 2003
BOONSBORO - One of Sandra Neal's bingo friends called her "a lucky thing" when she got the news she'd won a new Maytag refrigerator in a recent Coca-Cola promotion. Neal filled out an entry form that was part of a display for Coca-Cola's new fridge pack at the Food Lion where she shops and became eligible to win the 27-cubic-foot refrigerator from Central Coca-Cola Bottling Co. in Hagerstown. More than 11,000 entries were received from residents in Maryland, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Virginia, said David Lilly, sales center manager of the Hagerstown plant.
NEWS
January 27, 1998
Conquering your fear of the refrigerator If thoughts of cleaning the refrigerator give you chills, you're not alone. The prospect can be scary, because the closed door can hide just about anything, says Carolyn Verweyst, manager of marketing communications at Whirlpool Home Appliances. "No one takes responsibility for the refrigerator, even though everyone uses it," Verweyst says. Eighteen percent of respondents in a Whirlpool survey said they clean their refrigerator twice a year, 5 percent said they clean it once a year and 3.5 percent said they never clean the appliance at all. The subject is so popular that Whirlpool Home Appliances has had a Clean Out Your Refrigerator Day for the past four years.
NEWS
August 24, 2008
FREDERICK, Md. - Beverly Reidinger, of Frederick, will join students, institutions, utility companies, private organizations and individual artists from across the country in an exhibition featuring old refrigerator units. The units have been recycled and converted to works of art as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Star Recycle My Old Fridge campaign. The exhibit will be on display from Monday, Aug. 25, through Tuesday, Sept. 2, at National Building Museum, 401 F St. N.W. in Washington, D.C. Reidinger was selected as the official artist for the State of Maryland.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | October 15, 2003
Often chosen as a symbol of nutrition and health by graphic artists, apples are a good source of folic acid and a moderate source of several other nutrients. They're also relatively low in calories. An average apple supplies around 80 calories. Apples are especially rich in pectin fiber, which is associated with helping keep blood cholesterol levels in balance. It is this pectin fiber, along with its moisture content and bland flavor, that makes applesauce a good low-fat substitute for some of the fat in cakes, muffins and cookies.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | September 24, 2003
Making a couple of extra stops on the way home from the grocery store? Not putting leftovers away until your favorite show is over? All these practices test the limits of how long food can be safely stored. Here are some safe food storage tips from the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition: Don't delay. Refrigerate or freeze perishables right away after picking them up from the grocery store or deli. Keep it cool. Use a refrigerator/freezer thermometer to make sure your refrigerator is between 35 degrees and 40 degrees and your freezer is below zero degrees.
NEWS
by Lynn F. Little | May 29, 2002
Spring is here! Along with the many wonders of spring comes the dubious task of spring-cleaning. Whether you're spring-cleaning is a top to bottom thorough cleaning or just a light cleaning, be sure to include your kitchen cupboards, the refrigerator and the freezer. In cupboards and pantries: -- Organize your canned goods and other non-perishable foods so that the older products are in front. Check expiration and use-by dates and discard any food that has expired or is past its prime.
NEWS
February 19, 2002
Ode to your refrigerator By JoEllen Barnhart Every company has its nerve center. The true hot spot where all major decisions are made, plans are formulated and great accomplishments are shared. In the home, the nerve has a nickname: The fridge. Yes, the humble refrigerator. The first practical home-use refrigerator appeared in Chicago in 1913, called the Domelre. That's French for: "giant metal box for sticking pictures and notes on, si'l vous plait. " Take a close look at your fridge.
NEWS
June 13, 2006
On Mother's Day, a Rhode Island Red hen owned by Sara Swartz, 17, of the Williamsport area, laid an egg measuring 4 inches long by 3 inches across. Sara's mother, Jo Ellen Swartz, said people who saw the egg wanted to see how many yolks were inside. She cracked it open and out popped a single yolk - plus a normal-size chicken egg. The egg dwarfs the others in the Swartzes' refrigerator.
NEWS
By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI | February 3, 2000
A Tuesday night blaze that gutted a two-story duplex and damaged a duplex next door likely was caused by a faulty cord on a refrigerator, according to Hagerstown Fire Marshal John Hersh. cont. from front page Hersh spent several hours at 620-622 George St. Thursday examining the contents after contractors used a crane to remove the roof of the wood-frame house. The building was owned by Thomas Reilly, who lived there with his family. The fire started at 620 George St. and spread to 622, and then to the duplex next door at 616-618 George St. The fire caused some damage to the roof and interior of 618. The second duplex is owned by Doug Diehl of Smithsburg and is rented out to two families.
NEWS
June 30, 2002
The following food service establishments were inspected by the Washington County Health Department in May: Freddie's Subs. 18210 Oak Ridge Drive, Hagerstown. Light bulb must be replaced under range hood. Allegheny Energy. 10435 Downsville Pike, Hagerstown. No violations. Little Antietam Community Center. 40 Mt. Vernon Drive, Keedysville. Must obtain and display poster on how to treat someone who is choking. The Rhubarb House. 12 Public Square, Hagerstown.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | August 28, 2013
To remind Maryland Potomac Edison customers of a program that provides rebates for old refrigerators, freezers and room air conditioners, utility and JACO Environmental representatives “de-manufactured” an old refrigerator on Wednesday to show how its parts are recycled. Professionals from JACO broke down part of the refrigerator in a demonstration in Hagerstown, tearing apart its walls, taking out the foam on the inside and ripping apart the bottom. “Glass, plastic and metal all go out to recycle streams, and we work real hard to make sure they're going out into recycle streams, where they're getting reused,” JACO Environmental Senior Program Manger Sam Sirkin said.
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NEWS
Lynn Little | November 20, 2012
The University of Maryland Extension, together with the Partnership for Food Safety Education, have put together a list of safety tips for a fun, tasty and safe family Thanksgiving feast this year.  Get the right size bird for your big eaters, and thaw safely. Plan on a pound of whole turkey per person for your feast and you will also have some leftovers. The safest method for thawing a frozen whole turkey is in the refrigerator. Leave the bird in its original packaging and place in a shallow pan in the refrigerator.
NEWS
By LAUREN KIRKWOOD | lauren.kirkwood@herald-mail.com | June 26, 2012
Potomac Edison electric customers can give up their old refrigerators and receive $50 under a new program designed to take energy-wasting appliances out of use. The Appliance Recycling Program, which the company operates in partnership with JACO Environmental, can save participants up to $150 in annual energy costs, Potomac Edison spokesman Todd Meyers said. That's because refrigerators manufactured before 1990 can use three times as much electricity as more modern appliances, Meyers said.
NEWS
March 20, 2011
Fridge bill fails The House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday denied Del. Neil Parrott’s attempt to update the state law governing abandoned refrigerators. The committee voted 13-6 against the bill, largely along political lines. Republicans supported the bill; Democrats didn’t. Parrott proposed making the abandonment of a refrigerator a civil offense, punishable by a fine of up to $5,000. It’s now a crime with a possible jail term of up to 30 days and a maximum $100 fine.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | March 10, 2011
It should be a civil offense, not a crime, to abandon a refrigerator in Maryland, Del. Neil C. Parrott told his colleagues Thursday. During a bill hearing before the House Judiciary Committee, Parrott, R-Washington, argued that the refrigerator law is an outdated vestige of the 1950s, when refrigerators were built differently. Under current law, the criminal offense of abandoning a refrigerator carries a possible jail term of up to 30 days and a maximum fine of $100. That applies to a refrigerator, icebox or freezer cabinet left outside a building "in a place accessible to children," "uncrated," and with "a door or a lock that cannot be released for opening from the inside.
OPINION
February 21, 2011
I understand that Maryland has laws that make no sense. I understand the state has a propensity for regulatory overkill. I understand that in all likelihood, Maryland has a law requiring you to throw the box of Arm & Hammer baking soda out of your fridge after it’s been in there for six months. But if you’re a rookie lawmaker in Annapolis who campaigned on the issues of more jobs and less taxes — well, if your top priority is to change Maryland’s junk-refrigerator law, aren’t there some other topics you’ve missed?
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | February 18, 2011
Twenty years ago, determining whether a firefighter might need food and drink while battling a blaze generating temperatures up to 1,000 degrees was usually an afterthought, fire officials said. Firefighters would sometimes get relief in the form of a coffee or food wagon, but the care for fire crews was not close to what it is today, fire officials said. When a so-called "working structure fire" is dispatched these days, so is Rehab 255, a unit that fills a variety of needs for firefighters, from periodic medical checkups at a fire scene to providing cooling chairs in stifling heat.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | February 15, 2011
Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, is trying to make it a civil violation, not a crime, to abandon a refrigerator in Maryland. Violators no longer would face up to 30 days in jail. But the maximum fine would increase from $100 to $5,000 under a bill Parrott filed. Parrott said it was ridiculous that Maryland makes improper disposal of a refrigerator a misdemeanor. He said some state laws are outdated and need to be changed. Maryland's Criminal Law says a person can't abandon or discard a refrigerator, icebox or freezer cabinet outside a building "in a place accessible to children," "uncrated" and with "a door or a lock that cannot be released for opening from the inside.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | November 11, 2009
Cranberries have a tart, slightly acidic flavor and are served in a variety of ways. They can be eaten raw. They can be added to desserts, pastries, muffins and cakes. Dried cranberries (sometimes called craisins) are a tasty snack. With their high pectin content, cranberries are a good ingredient in jams. And, as a sauce, cranberries are the traditional accompaniment to roast turkey. Some people love cranberries; others turn their noses up at them. The health benefits of cranberries, combined with their unusual taste, versatility and ease of use, have led to increased popularity.
NEWS
By ARLENE BURNETT / Pittsburgh Post-Gazette | October 28, 2009
Here's a fun idea for an adults-only Halloween party. HAUNTED BLEEDING HEART (Tested by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) If you want gross, here it is, adapted from the 1972 book "How to Play With Your Food," by Penn and Teller. The recipe uses a 6-1/2-cup Valentine heart gelatin mold. I made changes in the ingredients to fit my 2-1/2-cup mold. I couldn't wait to invert the mold. The heart slid out easier than I expected (don't forget to coat the mold with cooking spray)
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