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By JULIE E. GREENE | April 1, 2007
SHIPPENSBURG, Pa. - When Steven Squyres gets up in the morning, he makes tea and logs onto his computer to see what happened overnight - on Mars. Squyres lives and works in Ithaca, N.Y., where he coordinates a team of 172 with the two most important and visible members being Spirit and Opportunity, the multimillion-dollar robotic rovers that landed on Mars in January 2004 after separate seven-month voyages. Squyres, principal investigator for the science instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover mission, will be the speaker Wednesday night at Shippensburg University's Memorial Auditorium.
NEWS
April 22, 2007
Tuesday Science fiction or fact? Is there life on Mars? A NASA engineer talks with Pulse reporter Alan Sokol about rockets, robots and the possibility of life on the Red Planet. Wednesday Building for education A new Maugansville Elementary School is one step closer to reality after school officials take part in a groundbreaking ceremony.
NEWS
November 6, 2000
Youth calendar 11/7 Movies Opening this week "Little Nicky" (PG-13) - Adam Sandler plays a man who has been sent to New York City from hell by his father, Satan, to search for his evil brothers. When Nicky meets Valerie, played by Patricia Arquette, he begins liking life on Earth a bit too much. "Red Planet" (PG-13) - Packed with futuristic, high-tech special effects, Red Planet is an action drama that explores the apocalyptic possibility of Earth becoming unlivable for humans.
NEWS
By CHRIS KOPKO/William Brish Planetarium and ANDY SMETZER/Tristate Astronomers | August 1, 2012
High-resolution video of portions of the descent will be taken as the rover is lowered to the landing site via rockets, parachute and finally, sky crane.  After approximately four days of testing of the rover's systems and surroundings, Curiosity will set out on its mission to help achieve the four main goals of the Mars Exploration Program. These include sampling the environment to determine whether conditions ever existed on Mars that were conducive to life, characterization of the climate and geology of Mars, and to prepare for human exploration of the red planet.  If all goes according to plan Curiosity's primary mission will last for almost two Earth years, and will take the rover up to twelve miles from its landing site.  This will be another big step toward the goal of eventually sending a manned mission to Mars.  For more information on this mission visit http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ .   William Brish Planetarium/Tristate Astronomers The William Brish Planetarium will re-open in mid-August.
NEWS
August 4, 2003
Children at three of Washington County's public libraries were recently invited to take a "Stroll on Mars" with Helen Hart of Johns Hopkins University's Department of Astronomy and Physics. Hart works with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer mission, which involves a satellite that photographs space phenomena using ultraviolet light. Hart also has done extensive research about the planet Mars. Working with Hart during the July 26 program were her husband, astronomer Jim Phillips, and a co-worker on the FUSE project, Julia Andersen.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | August 25, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com It's literally out of this world, but it's also the closest it gets. "This year, Mars and Earth happen to be in the part of their orbits where they are very, very close to the absolute closest they can ever be to each other," said Helen M. Hart, operations astronomer at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. On Tuesday, when Earth, which takes a year to orbit the sun, passes Mars, which takes nearly two years to run a similar course, the two planets will be about 35 million miles apart.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | April 23, 2009
The Maryland Symphony Orchestra will close its 27th season with a concert that promises to be out of this world. "A Symphonic Space Odyssey" will carry Maryland Theatre audiences on a journey through the solar system with several musical stops. Carl Nielsen's "Helios Overture" was inspired by the rising and setting of the sun seen by the Danish composer while cruising the Aegean Sea. Claude Debussy's "Clair de lune" will honor earth's silvery satellite, and the program's first half will conclude with the stirring "Star Wars" main theme by John Williams.
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NEWS
By CHRIS KOPKO/William Brish Planetarium and ANDY SMETZER/Tristate Astronomers | August 1, 2012
High-resolution video of portions of the descent will be taken as the rover is lowered to the landing site via rockets, parachute and finally, sky crane.  After approximately four days of testing of the rover's systems and surroundings, Curiosity will set out on its mission to help achieve the four main goals of the Mars Exploration Program. These include sampling the environment to determine whether conditions ever existed on Mars that were conducive to life, characterization of the climate and geology of Mars, and to prepare for human exploration of the red planet.  If all goes according to plan Curiosity's primary mission will last for almost two Earth years, and will take the rover up to twelve miles from its landing site.  This will be another big step toward the goal of eventually sending a manned mission to Mars.  For more information on this mission visit http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/ .   William Brish Planetarium/Tristate Astronomers The William Brish Planetarium will re-open in mid-August.
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NEWS
By ROD MARTIN / Brish Planetarium and ANDY SMETZER / Tristate Astronomers | November 2, 2009
Visible evening planets Jupiter is visible all evening. Mercury might be visible at the end of the month. Visible morning planets Vemus is bright in the east before sunrise. Mars is high in the southeast. Saturn rises shortly before the sun. For more information about the visible evening planets and nighttime sky, download the planetarium's podcast "Skylights" from antpod.com . Solar System The November sky has many bright stars from the fall as it transitions to the well-known winter stars and constellations.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | April 23, 2009
The Maryland Symphony Orchestra will close its 27th season with a concert that promises to be out of this world. "A Symphonic Space Odyssey" will carry Maryland Theatre audiences on a journey through the solar system with several musical stops. Carl Nielsen's "Helios Overture" was inspired by the rising and setting of the sun seen by the Danish composer while cruising the Aegean Sea. Claude Debussy's "Clair de lune" will honor earth's silvery satellite, and the program's first half will conclude with the stirring "Star Wars" main theme by John Williams.
NEWS
April 22, 2007
Tuesday Science fiction or fact? Is there life on Mars? A NASA engineer talks with Pulse reporter Alan Sokol about rockets, robots and the possibility of life on the Red Planet. Wednesday Building for education A new Maugansville Elementary School is one step closer to reality after school officials take part in a groundbreaking ceremony.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | April 1, 2007
SHIPPENSBURG, Pa. - When Steven Squyres gets up in the morning, he makes tea and logs onto his computer to see what happened overnight - on Mars. Squyres lives and works in Ithaca, N.Y., where he coordinates a team of 172 with the two most important and visible members being Spirit and Opportunity, the multimillion-dollar robotic rovers that landed on Mars in January 2004 after separate seven-month voyages. Squyres, principal investigator for the science instruments on the Mars Exploration Rover mission, will be the speaker Wednesday night at Shippensburg University's Memorial Auditorium.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | August 25, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com It's literally out of this world, but it's also the closest it gets. "This year, Mars and Earth happen to be in the part of their orbits where they are very, very close to the absolute closest they can ever be to each other," said Helen M. Hart, operations astronomer at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. On Tuesday, when Earth, which takes a year to orbit the sun, passes Mars, which takes nearly two years to run a similar course, the two planets will be about 35 million miles apart.
NEWS
August 4, 2003
Children at three of Washington County's public libraries were recently invited to take a "Stroll on Mars" with Helen Hart of Johns Hopkins University's Department of Astronomy and Physics. Hart works with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer mission, which involves a satellite that photographs space phenomena using ultraviolet light. Hart also has done extensive research about the planet Mars. Working with Hart during the July 26 program were her husband, astronomer Jim Phillips, and a co-worker on the FUSE project, Julia Andersen.
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