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Recycling Bins

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NEWS
July 1, 2011
People who have been using the Washington County recycling bins in Funkstown will no longer be able to do so after mid-July. At the request of the Funkstown Volunteer Fire Co., the two county recycling bins at the Funkstown fire station will be removed on July 15, said Cliff Engle, who heads the county's Solid Waste Department. The decision follows the removal of seven county recycling bins from the city of Hagerstown at the beginning of June and one from Smithsburg last week.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | June 27, 2011
Some people accustomed to public recycling in Hagerstown have had to change their routines. At the beginning of June, Washington County removed seven large recycling bins from four public parking lots within the city. As a result, bins at several other public places in the county have been used more often. The bins in Hagerstown were considered a drain on the county and a blight for the city, but were convenient for people who regularly used them to recycle plastic, glass and paper products.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | May 16, 2012
Halfway resident Tim Rohrer, 32, did not hide his displeasure with curbside-recycling bins when asked on Wednesday. “I think it's ridiculous that they get rid of things like that around town,” Rohrer said. “Now we have to pay for it.” Rohrer, who lives at 11017 Coffman Ave., was among the residents in Halfway and north of Hagerstown who talked about the new recycling program launched by Allied Waste. Allied Waste distributed bins this week after sending out postcards earlier this month giving residents a chance to opt out of the program.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | February 2, 2012
As part of the city's new refuse and recycling program that began Jan. 1, the Hagerstown City Council this week took the final step toward purchasing recycling containers. The council voted 4-1 Tuesday night to approve an ordinance authorizing city officials to enter into a 10-year, $600,000 loan to finance the new bins, which also are referred to as “totes,” with a 4 percent interest rate for the first seven years of the loan. The final three years would be adjusted to reflect the Wall Street Journal prime rate, which has been 3.25 percent since December 2008, according to city documents.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | January 7, 2003
Town given certificate of appreciation During Monday's Boonsboro Town Council meeting, Washington County Sheriff's Deputy Jeff Hewett presented the Town Council and mayor with a certificate of appreciation for its cooperation and support of Washington County's DARE program. DARE, which stands for Drug Abuse Resistance Education, has been in Washington County for about 10 years. The town sponsors the DARE program in the Boonsboro schools at a cost of about $800, Town Manager John L. Kendall said.
NEWS
BY SCOTT BUTKI | July 18, 2003
scottb@herald-mail.com Hagerstown trash customers are recycling about 24 percent more mixed paper a month than in the past, Hagerstown City Engineer Rodney Tissue said Thursday. In 2002, city residents left an average of 28.08 tons a month of recycled items for pickup by BFI. For March, April, May and June of this year, the average monthly tonnage increased to 34.82 tons per month, Tissue said. In March, 35.46 tons were recycled, followed by 32.51 tons in April, 30.35 tons in May and 40.97 tons in June, he said.
OPINION
July 17, 2012
Commissioners have botched recycling issue To the editor: I just came from the Washington County landfill, where I was informed that I needed to pay $36 annually for the privilege of recycling.  I have been a recycler since the option became available locally.  The county used to have recycling bins in various places around the county. I used the one located in the South End shopping center.  Then, about 2 years ago these recycling bins started to disappear.
NEWS
January 28, 2002
Site of tire fire eyed for recycling center By DAVE McMILLION / Staff Writer, Charles Town INWOOD, W.Va. - A 10-acre site where 3 million tires caught fire eight years is being considered as the home for a new recycling center, a county official said Sunday. Hundreds of firefighters from the Tri-State area worked for 36 hours when the tire pile caught fire in September 1993. The state Department of Environmental Protection spent $6 million cleaning up the site and has owned the property since then, said Clint Hogbin, chairman of the Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority.
NEWS
August 26, 2004
Applications accepted for training classes The Cumberland Valley Technology Center, the Education Division of the Cumberland Valley Chapter of Associated Builders & Contractors, is accepting applications for apprenticeship training classes in carpentry, electrical, HVAC-R and plumbing. The program is registered with the U.S. Department of Labor, the Maryland, Pennsylvania and West Virginia Apprenticeship & Training Councils and the Veterans Administration. Interested persons must be at least 16 years old, have a high school diploma or GED, be physically able to perform the work required and have a means of transportation.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | January 15, 2003
Community residents request tax rebate About 100 residents of a Hagerstown gated community attended a Hagerstown City Council work session Tuesday to submit a petition asking for a tax rebate for city services not provided to them. Mayor William M. Breichner said the city will consider their request, but Councilman Lewis Metzner said he would be shocked if the city gave them any money. The residents are part of the homeowners association at Summerland Manor, a gated community off Security Road.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 23, 2013
“This is for the street cleaner here in the wonderful city of Hagerstown. There is a street called Fry Avenue, and somehow he never gets down our street, for about the last three years. I'd appreciate it. And there are two sides to our street, also. It's one block, one way. I think it won't take him long to do it. We would appreciate it.” - Hagerstown “Nice articles in the paper, the opinion from The Herald-Mail. You hit it on target, with all this rhetoric we hear up here from most of the politicians in Washington County.
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OPINION
July 17, 2012
Commissioners have botched recycling issue To the editor: I just came from the Washington County landfill, where I was informed that I needed to pay $36 annually for the privilege of recycling.  I have been a recycler since the option became available locally.  The county used to have recycling bins in various places around the county. I used the one located in the South End shopping center.  Then, about 2 years ago these recycling bins started to disappear.
NEWS
Cathy Grantham | Around Maugansville | June 22, 2012
Maugansville Elementary School's principal, Archie Van Norden, will retire at the end of this month after working for 36 years in Washington County Public Schools.  He wants Maugansville residents to know that he felt honored to be selected as the first principal of the new school and has appreciated everyone's efforts in making the school a wonderful place for student learning.  He said he has thoroughly enjoyed working with the students, parents,...
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | May 19, 2012
Since deciding in January to scale back county recycling to promote use of private curbside pickup, the Washington County Board of Commissioners has faced criticism from both sides of the issue. To some, the solution - a private, opt-out curbside pickup program - did not seem comprehensive or compulsory enough; to others, not voluntary enough. Meanwhile, the decision to restrict access to the county's drop-off recycling bins and to begin charging to use them has led to concerns that frustrated users will stop recycling altogether.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | May 16, 2012
Halfway resident Tim Rohrer, 32, did not hide his displeasure with curbside-recycling bins when asked on Wednesday. “I think it's ridiculous that they get rid of things like that around town,” Rohrer said. “Now we have to pay for it.” Rohrer, who lives at 11017 Coffman Ave., was among the residents in Halfway and north of Hagerstown who talked about the new recycling program launched by Allied Waste. Allied Waste distributed bins this week after sending out postcards earlier this month giving residents a chance to opt out of the program.
OPINION
April 2, 2012
This month, Keedysville became the fifth Washington County jurisdiction to adopt curbside recycling. So we take this opportunity to congratulate the town and to offer a gentle “ahem” to the county government, which continues to struggle with the issue. Keedysville solved the problem, if a problem it be, with a simple solution: Twice-a-week trash collection was converted to one day for trash pick-up and one day for recycling. Already, the town is reporting 60 percent compliance, which indicates that the people might be more ready for recycling than their governments give them credit for. Perhaps the Boonsboro Town Council took notice of this.
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