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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 2, 2012
Maryland health officials say laboratory tests have confirmed the presence of the illness-causing bacteria, Campylobacter jejuni, in two unopened samples purchased from the Family Cow farm in Chambersburg The number of people in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia and New Jersey stricken with illness after consuming raw, unpasteurized milk from the same farm has risen to 37, the Pennsylvania Department of Health confirmed Thursday. Pennsylvania officials said their tests for bacteria in samples had not yet yielded results.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 29, 2013
A Chambersburg-area farm involved in a bacteria outbreak last year is the subject of a new warning from the Pennsylvania departments of health and agriculture. Five people who consumed unpasteurized milk from The Family Cow, 3854 Olde Scotland Road, between April 30 and May 10 suffered illnesses confirmed to be related to Campylobacter bacteria, according to a news release from the state departments issued Wednesday. “Agriculture officials ordered the owners of the farm to stop the sale of all raw milk until further notice,” the news release stated.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 16, 2012
The number of people sickened by raw milk linked to a Franklin County farm has climbed to 77, possibly making it the largest outbreak in Pennsylvania history. Pennsylvania Department of Health officials said Thursday that the total number of cases continued to increase. The department has identified 67 cases in Pennsylvania, five in Maryland, two in New Jersey and three in West Virginia. Individuals suffered digestive issues associated with a Campylobacter jejuni bacterial infection.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
It's rich to hear state health departments and the federal Food and Drug Administration shake a warning finger at the Maryland General Assembly over the dangers of raw milk. It is equally quaint to hear the farm bureaus raise the same complaints, considering that many of their dairy-farmer members grew up drinking the stuff. The message is that any milk that hasn't been cooked beyond recognition under the watchful eye of government regulators is unfit for human consumption - and as regulators guard the front door with shotguns to prevent a dairy breaking and entering, tons of bacterially poisoned peanut butter are slipping in through the back, which should be proof enough that it's the producer, not the product, that makes the difference.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 6, 2012
The state on Monday cleared a Chambersburg-area farm for milk production, while the number of people sickened in the past several weeks by raw milk produced at the farm continued to rise.   The number of confirmed cases reached 43 as of 4 p.m. Monday, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Health. The illness comes from a bacteria, Campylobacter jejuni. It was found when Maryland health officials tested two unopened samples purchased from the Family Cow farm in Chambersburg.
NEWS
March 26, 2007
Milk gets raw deal To the editor: Regarding the March 17 Thumbs Down to HB 1010 legalizing the sale of raw milk directly to the consumer: This bill is intended to legalize the sale of clean, raw milk. That is, milk from licensed farms that have passed stringent tests for their facilities, their cows and the milk itself. Pasturized milk is difficult to digest and contributes to long-term health problems. Many adults (myself included) simply avoid it and thus have difficulty getting enough calcium in our diets.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | March 11, 2012
“Are you a raw milk drinker?” a CBS news report darkly begins. If so, “according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there's a good chance you might get sick.” Never mind that the report didn't say this. The report did come to the rather obvious conclusion that a person is more likely to get sick from raw milk than from pasteurized milk, just as it is more likely that a person would get sick from drinking unboiled water. But the news made it sound as if the odds are good that raw milk drinkers will become ill, when actually the CDC report would indicate just the opposite.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | April 13, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Preliminary plans were reviewed by the Waynesboro Planning Commission Monday night to turn land once occupied by an automobile dealership on the corner of South Potomac and West Third streets into a Rutter's Farm Store. The property, once the site of the Brake Pontiac-Cadillac dealership, is being sold to the York County, Pa.-based convenience store company by Waynesboro developer and Realtor Ronnie Martin. Martin presented a preliminary sketch to the planning commission.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | May 29, 2013
A Chambersburg-area farm involved in a bacteria outbreak last year is the subject of a new warning from the Pennsylvania departments of health and agriculture. Five people who consumed unpasteurized milk from The Family Cow, 3854 Olde Scotland Road, between April 30 and May 10 suffered illnesses confirmed to be related to Campylobacter bacteria, according to a news release from the state departments issued Wednesday. “Agriculture officials ordered the owners of the farm to stop the sale of all raw milk until further notice,” the news release stated.
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OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | March 11, 2012
“Are you a raw milk drinker?” a CBS news report darkly begins. If so, “according to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there's a good chance you might get sick.” Never mind that the report didn't say this. The report did come to the rather obvious conclusion that a person is more likely to get sick from raw milk than from pasteurized milk, just as it is more likely that a person would get sick from drinking unboiled water. But the news made it sound as if the odds are good that raw milk drinkers will become ill, when actually the CDC report would indicate just the opposite.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 16, 2012
The number of people sickened by raw milk linked to a Franklin County farm has climbed to 77, possibly making it the largest outbreak in Pennsylvania history. Pennsylvania Department of Health officials said Thursday that the total number of cases continued to increase. The department has identified 67 cases in Pennsylvania, five in Maryland, two in New Jersey and three in West Virginia. Individuals suffered digestive issues associated with a Campylobacter jejuni bacterial infection.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 6, 2012
The state on Monday cleared a Chambersburg-area farm for milk production, while the number of people sickened in the past several weeks by raw milk produced at the farm continued to rise.   The number of confirmed cases reached 43 as of 4 p.m. Monday, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Health. The illness comes from a bacteria, Campylobacter jejuni. It was found when Maryland health officials tested two unopened samples purchased from the Family Cow farm in Chambersburg.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 2, 2012
Maryland health officials say laboratory tests have confirmed the presence of the illness-causing bacteria, Campylobacter jejuni, in two unopened samples purchased from the Family Cow farm in Chambersburg The number of people in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia and New Jersey stricken with illness after consuming raw, unpasteurized milk from the same farm has risen to 37, the Pennsylvania Department of Health confirmed Thursday. Pennsylvania officials said their tests for bacteria in samples had not yet yielded results.
OPINION
December 16, 2010
Drinking raw milk should be a personal choice To the editor: Having read the column by Chad Smith in the Monday, Dec. 6, edition of The Herald-Mail (“Raw milk, false cures, real facts,” page A8), I think he is giving a bad image of the dairy farmer and raw milk. Smith states the number of illnesses (1,505), hospitalizations (185) and deaths (two) over a 13-year period (1993 to 2006). Over the past several years, how many cases of food poisoning and illnesses have there been over food processed at a food facility?
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | February 25, 2009
BOONSBORO -- Dozens of Boonsboro High School students gathered behind the tennis courts Wednesday afternoon to cheer and heckle at the showdown of a lifetime -- assistant principal Garth Fazio versus athletic director Mark Wadel -- milking a cow. "C'mon, Bessie!" Fazio yelled as he pumped the udders with both hands, ultimately besting Wadel by filling a quarter cup in one minute. Their milking matchup was one of four hosted at the school Wednesday by the Boonsboro High School FFA as part of a weeklong celebration of National FFA week.
NEWS
February 24, 2009
"This is in regards to the comment about Alesia Parson-McBean listing her address as City Hall. She lists it that way because - if you would have read the paper as well for that - a few years ago she had some hate mail, including death threats. That is why she lists it, for her personal safety as well as for her family. So you can put your vote back in for her now, because that is the only reason she lists the City Hall as her residence. " - Hagerstown "I think Tim Rowland was right on point the other day, to say that raw milk from farmers should be legalized.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
It's rich to hear state health departments and the federal Food and Drug Administration shake a warning finger at the Maryland General Assembly over the dangers of raw milk. It is equally quaint to hear the farm bureaus raise the same complaints, considering that many of their dairy-farmer members grew up drinking the stuff. The message is that any milk that hasn't been cooked beyond recognition under the watchful eye of government regulators is unfit for human consumption - and as regulators guard the front door with shotguns to prevent a dairy breaking and entering, tons of bacterially poisoned peanut butter are slipping in through the back, which should be proof enough that it's the producer, not the product, that makes the difference.
NEWS
January 18, 2009
Citing our poor health, government scolds us for not exercising. Then when we try to exercise, government says we can't, citing, of all things, health regulations. Because of a $2 billion budget deficit, the State of Maryland says it is looking for inexpensive ways this year to improve our quality of life. Here would be a good start: Wipe out a whole raft of state-imposed regulations that prevent whole communities from getting healthier under the theory that one member of that community might not, however slim that chance might be. A clear example was on display this week, when a group of seniors were told they could no longer swim at the pool in the Plaza Hotel because there's no life guard on duty.
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