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NEWS
October 17, 2000
Be smart: Keep foods apart Cross-contamination is the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods, cutting boards, utensils, etc. when they are not handled properly. Cutting raw meat, poultry or fish on a cutting board and then slicing salad vegetables on the same cutting board - without first washing the board - is an example of how food can be exposed to bacteria through cross-contamination. This spreads bacteria, such as Salmonella, which are destroyed as raw meat cooks, to the salad vegetables - which won't be cooked.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | October 6, 2004
How often do you think about the safety of the food you are preparing or eating? Do you just assume that if food is available to eat, it must be safe? Being aware starts with keeping the four steps of food safety in mind: Clean, separate, cook and chill. Clean Wash hands and surfaces often. Cleanliness is a major factor in preventing foodborne illness. Bacteria introduced by humans, pets or foods can easily spread throughout the kitchen and get onto cutting boards, utensils, sponges and countertops.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | July 1, 2002
Health Q&A Q: What are some summer food safety tips I can follow when cooking or grilling outside? A: Heat fresh meat, fish or poultry to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit. It should be served at 140 degrees F or higher. Cheese and milk-based products should be stored below 40 degrees. Wash your hands before and after preparing food, and before moving on to a new food. Bacteria grows between 40 and 140 degrees so keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold.
NEWS
Lynn Little | May 21, 2013
Memorial Day marks the beginning of the summer grilling season. Grilling, one of the easiest low-fat cooking methods, can be a centerpiece for summertime meals. When grilling, as with other food preparation methods, it is important to follow food-handling and safety guidelines.   Grills need annual cleaning after winter storage by scouring the grate with a grill brush. Spray the grill with oven cleaner and rinse thoroughly. Before each use, apply non-stick cooking spray to prevent food from sticking to the grill.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | June 22, 2005
Warm weather is ideal for enjoying outdoor picnics and barbecues - the perfect environment for bacteria and other pathogens in food to multiply rapidly and cause foodborne illness. With a little knowledge and planning, though, outdoor picnics can be enjoyable and safe. Raw animal products can be a source of unwanted bacteria. Cooking meat kills pathogens that might be present. When grilling foods, preheat the coals on your grill for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the coals are lightly coated with ash. Be sure to bring along a meat thermometer to confirm that hamburger patties have reached an internal temperature of 160 degrees before removing from the grill.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | July 9, 2003
There's something special about packing a picnic and heading to the park or hills to enjoy being in the great outdoors. Whether your picnic is an elaborate gourmet affair or a simple packed lunch, the last thing you want to bring home with you is food poisoning. You expect to see ants and other bugs at picnics. While you can see ants and avoid them, it's not possible to see, taste or smell dangerous bacteria that may cause illness if food is mishandled. When planning a picnic or cookout, make a list of items to pack.
NEWS
December 12, 2000
Keep holiday party buffet foods safe Buffets are a popular way to serve food at holiday parties and dinners. But buffets, where foods are left out for long periods of time, leave the door open for uninvited guests - bacteria that cause food-borne illness. Here are some tips to keep holiday parties and buffets trouble-free: HEIGHT="6" ALT=" "> Always wash your hands before and after handling food. Keep your kitchen, dishes and utensils clean. HEIGHT="6" ALT=" "> Always serve food on clean plates, not those that previously held raw meat or poultry.
NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | July 28, 2010
Hot summer days, a picnic, an outdoor gathering of family and friends, a ballgame all can be prime times for food safety mistakes that put families and friends at risk of food borne illness. Outdoor picnics and other activities where you serve food, especially in warm weather, can present opportunities for food borne bacteria to thrive. Follow these simple steps to avoid food safety mistakes and protect your family and friends: Prepare your meals at home, remembering to wash your hands with warm soapy water first.
NEWS
October 25, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer If you order a rare hamburger at the Historic Hilltop House, you just might find Rodney Miller at your table trying to talk you out of it. "I'll tell them I want to cook it to at least medium. I basically push to sell it well," said Miller, assistant cook at the Harpers Ferry, W.Va., restaurant. Amid a series of outbreaks of food-borne illnesses across the country, Tri-State area restaurants have all but abandoned the rare hamburger. Federal inspectors this week said they have discovered for the first time E. coli contamination in imported ground beef, preventing more than 34,000 pounds of the Canadian product from getting into the marketplace.
NEWS
May 20, 1997
Picnic safety Don't allow foodborne illness to spoil your day By TERI JOHNSON Staff Writer It's no picnic when food poisoning invades your gathering. There is a significant rise in foodborne illness in the summer, says Diane Van, acting supervisor of United States Department of Agriculture's Meat and Poultry Hotline. Each year an estimated 4,000 deaths and 5 million sicknesses result from food-borne illnesses from the consumption of meat and poultry products, Van says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Lynn Little | May 21, 2013
Memorial Day marks the beginning of the summer grilling season. Grilling, one of the easiest low-fat cooking methods, can be a centerpiece for summertime meals. When grilling, as with other food preparation methods, it is important to follow food-handling and safety guidelines.   Grills need annual cleaning after winter storage by scouring the grate with a grill brush. Spray the grill with oven cleaner and rinse thoroughly. Before each use, apply non-stick cooking spray to prevent food from sticking to the grill.
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NEWS
By LYNN LITTLE | July 28, 2010
Hot summer days, a picnic, an outdoor gathering of family and friends, a ballgame all can be prime times for food safety mistakes that put families and friends at risk of food borne illness. Outdoor picnics and other activities where you serve food, especially in warm weather, can present opportunities for food borne bacteria to thrive. Follow these simple steps to avoid food safety mistakes and protect your family and friends: Prepare your meals at home, remembering to wash your hands with warm soapy water first.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | June 22, 2005
Warm weather is ideal for enjoying outdoor picnics and barbecues - the perfect environment for bacteria and other pathogens in food to multiply rapidly and cause foodborne illness. With a little knowledge and planning, though, outdoor picnics can be enjoyable and safe. Raw animal products can be a source of unwanted bacteria. Cooking meat kills pathogens that might be present. When grilling foods, preheat the coals on your grill for 20 to 30 minutes, or until the coals are lightly coated with ash. Be sure to bring along a meat thermometer to confirm that hamburger patties have reached an internal temperature of 160 degrees before removing from the grill.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | October 6, 2004
How often do you think about the safety of the food you are preparing or eating? Do you just assume that if food is available to eat, it must be safe? Being aware starts with keeping the four steps of food safety in mind: Clean, separate, cook and chill. Clean Wash hands and surfaces often. Cleanliness is a major factor in preventing foodborne illness. Bacteria introduced by humans, pets or foods can easily spread throughout the kitchen and get onto cutting boards, utensils, sponges and countertops.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | June 23, 2004
The number of food-borne illnesses increases during the summer. Bacteria love the hot, humid days of summer and grow faster then than at any other time of the year. At the same time temperatures rise, we're more likely to leave food unrefrigerated for longer time periods. Food sits out at picnics, barbecues and during travel. Washing facilities and thermostat-controlled cooking appliances often are not available at picnic sites. People may leave their food thermometer in their kitchen when cooking outdoors.
NEWS
by LYNN F. LITTLE | July 9, 2003
There's something special about packing a picnic and heading to the park or hills to enjoy being in the great outdoors. Whether your picnic is an elaborate gourmet affair or a simple packed lunch, the last thing you want to bring home with you is food poisoning. You expect to see ants and other bugs at picnics. While you can see ants and avoid them, it's not possible to see, taste or smell dangerous bacteria that may cause illness if food is mishandled. When planning a picnic or cookout, make a list of items to pack.
NEWS
by Christine L. Moats | July 1, 2002
Health Q&A Q: What are some summer food safety tips I can follow when cooking or grilling outside? A: Heat fresh meat, fish or poultry to at least 160 degrees Fahrenheit. It should be served at 140 degrees F or higher. Cheese and milk-based products should be stored below 40 degrees. Wash your hands before and after preparing food, and before moving on to a new food. Bacteria grows between 40 and 140 degrees so keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold.
NEWS
December 12, 2000
Keep holiday party buffet foods safe Buffets are a popular way to serve food at holiday parties and dinners. But buffets, where foods are left out for long periods of time, leave the door open for uninvited guests - bacteria that cause food-borne illness. Here are some tips to keep holiday parties and buffets trouble-free: HEIGHT="6" ALT=" "> Always wash your hands before and after handling food. Keep your kitchen, dishes and utensils clean. HEIGHT="6" ALT=" "> Always serve food on clean plates, not those that previously held raw meat or poultry.
NEWS
October 17, 2000
Be smart: Keep foods apart Cross-contamination is the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods, cutting boards, utensils, etc. when they are not handled properly. Cutting raw meat, poultry or fish on a cutting board and then slicing salad vegetables on the same cutting board - without first washing the board - is an example of how food can be exposed to bacteria through cross-contamination. This spreads bacteria, such as Salmonella, which are destroyed as raw meat cooks, to the salad vegetables - which won't be cooked.
NEWS
October 25, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer If you order a rare hamburger at the Historic Hilltop House, you just might find Rodney Miller at your table trying to talk you out of it. "I'll tell them I want to cook it to at least medium. I basically push to sell it well," said Miller, assistant cook at the Harpers Ferry, W.Va., restaurant. Amid a series of outbreaks of food-borne illnesses across the country, Tri-State area restaurants have all but abandoned the rare hamburger. Federal inspectors this week said they have discovered for the first time E. coli contamination in imported ground beef, preventing more than 34,000 pounds of the Canadian product from getting into the marketplace.
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