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Ramadan

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NEWS
September 20, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- The Islamic Society of Western Maryland in Hagerstown marked the end of Ramadan Sunday with a prayer service. This weekend was the end of the traditional Muslim holiday marked by a month of resisting food and drink from sunrise to sunset.
NEWS
by SANA SIDDIQUI | October 17, 2006
Ever since Sept. 11, 2001, the Muslim holy month of Ramadan has been seen as a dangerous month for the world's events. Some see it as a month for potentially more terrorist attacks. But non-Muslims should know that all these acts are completely against what Ramadan teaches us. I am a Muslim. As a sophomore attending Saint James School, I have always practiced my religion openly and explained it to my peers, either in school or in public. As months and seasons go by, there is always something new to teach them about my religion, such as why I wear modest clothing, and why I cannot eat certain foods.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | October 26, 2003
Two years ago, after I interviewed Maryland Correctional Training Center chaplain Ismael Ibraheen, I asked him if he'd like to go out to lunch. He couldn't, he said, because he was fasting for Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. Ramadan begins tomorrow and for observant Muslims it's a time of sacrifice and spiritual renewal, according to Syed Qasim Burmi, imam of the Islamic Society of Western Maryland, which has a mosque on Day Road in Hagerstown. Burmi, originally from Burma, or Myanmar, as it is now known, has been in Hagerstown for three years.
NEWS
by Stanley Niamatali | October 14, 2006
Last Monday, I was in TJ Max with my 3-year-old son when I decided to get some marzipan. As I walked with him to the car, I opened the package and offered him one of the colorful confections and was ready to try one, two or three when I realized I was fasting. This is the month of Ramadan - the month where Muslims fast between dawn and sunrise. As I drove home, I realized it is simple to live life without having to abstain from food and drink. However, I felt a great satisfaction in my hunger because I was fasting not only for Allah, the Giver of Life and Master of the Day of Judgment, but for myself.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | October 20, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - With foreheads pressed to the blue tarps before them, members of the local Islamic Society participated in prayers as a barefoot audience watched during a Ramadan open house Thursday. On one of the last nights of Islam's holiest month, the Islamic Society of Western Maryland opened its doors on Day Road to dozens of people of other faiths. Sitting on the floor and lined against the walls, groups of women and men separated by a divider listened in silence to a short period of prayers, as the society's members stood, bowed and kneeled.
NEWS
by NABELA ENAM | September 19, 2006
Imagine if you had a chance to erase all your past mistakes, even the really bad ones. That's what the Muslim holy month of Ramadan is about. Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calender, which is considered to be a great and blessed month by Muslims. During this month, Muslims (with few exceptions) must fast from dawn until dusk. Fasting requires abstaining from consuming food and drink (meaning all liquids including water and no alcoholic beverages because Muslims aren't allowed to drink that anyway)
NEWS
By HIRA ZEB | October 4, 2005
Tuesday, Oct. 4, marks a very special day for people of the Islamic faith. All throughout the world, Muslims unite to celebrate this holy month of fasting and prayer, known as Ramadan. Ramadan is the ninth month on the Muslim calendar, and Muslims believe that this is the month in which the first revelation came down to the Prophet Muhammad via Angel Gabriel. This month is taken to be a time for contemplation, prayer and abstinence. Every day in Ramadan, from dawn until sunset, Muslims do not eat, drink, smoke or engage in sexual relations.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | November 18, 2003
marlob@herald-mail.com The blessings of Ramadan will be shared with people of all faiths when The Islamic Society of Western Maryland opens its mosque to the general public Thursday from 5 to 7 p.m. "It is a time of obedience and respect for Allah and also for personal reflection," said Dr. Shahab Siddiqui, a Hagerstown physician and one of the organizers of the open house. Food will be served, so those who plan to attend are encouraged to call ahead so organizers can make sure there will be enough.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | November 15, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - More than 250 people from the Tri-State area gathered Sunday night in Hagerstown to celebrate the end of the monthlong holy observance of Ramadan. While most of those in attendance were from Washington County, there were Muslims from West Virginia and Pennsylvania present, said Dr. Shahab Siddiqui, an event organizer and social services director for the Islamic Society of Western Maryland. The regional event was at a hotel on Dual Highway because there was not enough room at the mosque, Siddiqui said.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | October 25, 2005
HAGERSTOWN erinc@herald-mail.com Five times each day during Ramadan, the Muslim holy month of fasting, Dr. Shahab Siddiqui goes to the Islamic Society of Western Maryland in Hagerstown to pray. Praying at the mosque, he said, is more honorable than praying elsewhere. Some prayers are formal verses; others are more personal. Ramadan began Oct. 5. The final day is Nov. 4. During an open house Monday night at the Islamic Society, Muslims and nonMuslims listened to Imam Yahya Hendi of Frederick, Md., recite verses from the Koran and talk about breaking religious borders and working together for peace.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 22, 2011
Taking time to appreciate Muslim experience To the editor: It was interesting to read R.M. Brown's letter on Aug. 2. It appears that she did not read my letter with an open mind. First, my letter was not a defense of sharia law as such, but its misuse of it by politicians to score a chip point. I would like to ask her which sharia book she is basing this comment on. She seems to be knowledgeable about sharia laws, as practiced by some misguided Muslims.
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NEWS
September 20, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- The Islamic Society of Western Maryland in Hagerstown marked the end of Ramadan Sunday with a prayer service. This weekend was the end of the traditional Muslim holiday marked by a month of resisting food and drink from sunrise to sunset.
NEWS
By AIMAN SIDDIQUI / Pulse Correspondent | October 9, 2007
I have looked forward to this Saturday, Oct. 13, for weeks. After a month of fasting I am eager to enjoy the day of Eid al-Fitr - one of the two religious celebrations ordained for Muslims. Eid is given by God to Muslims as a reward for the successful completion of Ramadan. Ramadan takes place during the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. During Ramadan, prayers, daytime fasting, charity and self-accountability are emphasized. On Eid, I jump out of bed around 7 or 8 in the morning, anxious to spend the day in celebration.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 28, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Imam Sularman has heard it all: Muslims worship Muhammed. Muslims worship the black stone in Mecca. Muslims worship the moon. That's how he can tell people are getting their information about Islam from the wrong sources. A Muslim would have quickly set the record straight: One of the religion's most fundamental principles is submission to the creator and Him alone. But not enough people are asking Muslims. "If I want to know something about Christianity, I'm certainly not going to go to a Jewish person," Sularman said.
NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | October 20, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - With foreheads pressed to the blue tarps before them, members of the local Islamic Society participated in prayers as a barefoot audience watched during a Ramadan open house Thursday. On one of the last nights of Islam's holiest month, the Islamic Society of Western Maryland opened its doors on Day Road to dozens of people of other faiths. Sitting on the floor and lined against the walls, groups of women and men separated by a divider listened in silence to a short period of prayers, as the society's members stood, bowed and kneeled.
NEWS
by SANA SIDDIQUI | October 17, 2006
Ever since Sept. 11, 2001, the Muslim holy month of Ramadan has been seen as a dangerous month for the world's events. Some see it as a month for potentially more terrorist attacks. But non-Muslims should know that all these acts are completely against what Ramadan teaches us. I am a Muslim. As a sophomore attending Saint James School, I have always practiced my religion openly and explained it to my peers, either in school or in public. As months and seasons go by, there is always something new to teach them about my religion, such as why I wear modest clothing, and why I cannot eat certain foods.
NEWS
by Stanley Niamatali | October 14, 2006
Last Monday, I was in TJ Max with my 3-year-old son when I decided to get some marzipan. As I walked with him to the car, I opened the package and offered him one of the colorful confections and was ready to try one, two or three when I realized I was fasting. This is the month of Ramadan - the month where Muslims fast between dawn and sunrise. As I drove home, I realized it is simple to live life without having to abstain from food and drink. However, I felt a great satisfaction in my hunger because I was fasting not only for Allah, the Giver of Life and Master of the Day of Judgment, but for myself.
NEWS
by NABELA ENAM | September 19, 2006
Imagine if you had a chance to erase all your past mistakes, even the really bad ones. That's what the Muslim holy month of Ramadan is about. Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calender, which is considered to be a great and blessed month by Muslims. During this month, Muslims (with few exceptions) must fast from dawn until dusk. Fasting requires abstaining from consuming food and drink (meaning all liquids including water and no alcoholic beverages because Muslims aren't allowed to drink that anyway)
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | July 16, 2006
It wasn't long after the Newcomers arrived in Athens that they started making their way to Mars Hill, the place in the Bible where Paul preached to the Greeks. Eight hours later, Catherine Reese Newcomer wrote, they were in Cairo amid festive Ramadan ceremonies. They didn't reach their hotel until 11 p.m. That was only the beginning of the Newcomer's tour through the Holy Lands, one of many trips Catherine and her husband Charles Newcomer recounted in the book they co-authored, "Precious Memories (A New Life)
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | October 25, 2005
HAGERSTOWN erinc@herald-mail.com Five times each day during Ramadan, the Muslim holy month of fasting, Dr. Shahab Siddiqui goes to the Islamic Society of Western Maryland in Hagerstown to pray. Praying at the mosque, he said, is more honorable than praying elsewhere. Some prayers are formal verses; others are more personal. Ramadan began Oct. 5. The final day is Nov. 4. During an open house Monday night at the Islamic Society, Muslims and nonMuslims listened to Imam Yahya Hendi of Frederick, Md., recite verses from the Koran and talk about breaking religious borders and working together for peace.
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