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Rainy Day Fund

NEWS
May 9, 2006
After Republicans in the Pennsylvania House decided last week they wouldn't vote on a bill to cut school property taxes - despite the House leadership's approval - the prospect of resolving this issue any time soon went up in smoke. And, just as is the case when the smoke clears from a house fire, something worse became visible. Some in the House now want to cut school property taxes by increasing the state sales tax. No, they're not kidding, but the GOP-controlled Pennsylvania Senate is not likely to go along.
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NEWS
by TARA REILLY | October 13, 2006
HAGERSTOWN - Many of the 10 candidates running for Washington County Commissioner said at a forum Thursday morning they support a change in the county's government to charter home rule. The candidates also expressed their views about agricultural land preservation, water and sewer capacity, education funding, economic development and other issues affecting the county. The Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce sponsored the forum held at the Four Points Sheraton.
NEWS
April 10, 2007
In 2005, the Chronicle of Higher Education held a live online chat with Joseph R. Ferrari, a professor of psychology at DePaul University and a leading researcher of chronic procrastination. Among other things, Ferrari told his callers that there was a link between not getting things done in a timely fashion and a wish to complete tasks perfectly - seeking a 100 percent solution when 85 percent would serve just as well. We thought about that this week, at the close of the 2007 session of the Maryland General Assembly, where once again a comprehensive answer to the state's budget problems was put off because the leadership couldn't agree on the perfect solution.
NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | May 28, 1998
by Joe Crocetta / staff photographer see the enlargement Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend led a host of prominent Democrats who touted the Glendening administration's record and pumped up the 300 partisan Democrats at Wednesday night's Jefferson-Jackson Day Dinner. Speaking at the Best Western Venice Inn on Dual Highway, Townsend reeled off a raft of statistics: a nine-year low in unemployment, 110,000 new jobs since 1995, a 43 percent drop in welfare cases, a 10 percent income tax reduction and cuts in 35 business taxes.
NEWS
November 14, 2000
Items to be presented to delegation Following are requests that the Washington County Commissioners will present to the local delegation to the Maryland General Assembly for the 2001 session: -- Get state authority to impose a county transfer tax, which would piggyback onto the state transfer tax. -- Allow the clerk of Washington County Circuit Court to waive or reduce fees for collections. This would enable the court to waive fees for the transfer tax. -- Restore a portion of state property tax to local subdivisions.
NEWS
April 19, 2001
Governor signs local bills today Annapolis By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com Washington County's sheriff will get a pay raise and local fire and rescue volunteers could get tax breaks under legislation to be signed into law today by Gov. Parris Glendening. Glendening plans to sign 126 bills today. He'll sign important legislation providing prescription drug relief for senior citizens as well as a less serious bill to name the calico the official state cat. Ten of the bills the governor will sign were sponsored by the Washington County Delegation to the Maryland General Assembly or individual local lawmakers.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | July 5, 2002
A Northampton County lawmaker's petition for a special session to overhaul Pennsylvania's property tax law may be legal, but considering everything the legislature has done in the heat of election-year pressure, it's probably an unwise move. Lawmakers have already gone along with Gov. Mark Schweiker's plan to take half the state's Rainy Day Fund and borrow millions more to finance business tax cuts. Now comes Sen. Lisa Boscola, who cited an obscure law that allows lawmakers to petition for a special session.
NEWS
January 23, 2003
This week Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell used his inaugural speech to offer an olive branch to the state's Republicans and to call for an end to partisan wrangling in the state legislature. His generous words should not lull anyone into believing that the cure for what ails the state budget will be easy. At his swearing-in ceremony Tuesday, Rendell said he understood why the previous administration had dipped into the state's Rainy Day Fund and tapped a number of "one-time" revenue sources to balance the budget.
NEWS
November 18, 2003
Everyone in Pennsylvania's state capital agrees that legalizing slot machines would bring much-needed revenue to the state. On just how to do that, there's an argument on every point. As one GOP lawmaker said, without some compromise, the legislature may end up rejecting the whole idea. Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell proposed slot machine legalization in part because his predecessor agreed to transfer half a billion dollars from the state's Rainy Day Fund to avoid raising taxes in an election year.
NEWS
September 29, 2000
Our view More parking should head up 'wish list' for 2001 assembly Last week, Hagerstown and Washington County governments took a look into the future, financially speaking, that is. As the time remaining before the 2001 General Assembly session grows short, elected officials must soon decide what's going to be at the top of their "wish list" for state funding. The possible future of downtown Hagerstown was presented to the city's planning commission last Wednesday, and the possibilities include a $4.4 million parking and open space plan for the University Systems of Maryland campus planned for downtown, a $46 million Civil War museum, a $10.4 million structure for the Arts & Entertainment District and a new $12 million office building, both on South Potomac Street.
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