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NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | April 23, 2010
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- To prevent possible flooding in the skate park area, the Morgan County Commission on Thursday unanimously approved the installation of a rain garden basin in the Berkeley Springs Bike and Skate Park on Ewing Street. The rain garden will be provided through a $5,000 grant from the Potomac Headwaters Resource Conservation and Development Council as a demonstration project, said Gordon MacLeod, a Morgan County Parks and Recreation board member. "We have to get started as soon as soon as possible" to be eligible for the grant, MacLeod said.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | March 28, 2009
Q: I have been thinking about putting in a rain garden. Do you have any advice? A: A rain garden is similar to other perennial flowerbeds that you might build - it just holds water longer. Rather than building a raised flowerbed by adding organic matter to get better drainage, a rain garden is a flowerbed built slightly lower so that water accumulates. Rain gardens provide several benefits to your landscape. They trap water that will slowly soak into the soil and not run off. This water helps your landscape because more water is available for a longer time deeper underground.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | June 14, 2007
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Perhaps it was fitting that rain slowly dampened the plans that Merle Holsinger was holding Thursday morning. The civil engineer walked around the site of a future rain garden, being funded with the Antietam Watershed Association's remaining $15,000 of its $100,000 Legacy Grant. The rain garden behind Summitview Elementary School will collect storm runoff from 64 acres surrounding it, said Stephen Rettig, president of the watershed association. The rain garden, which looks simply like an area of vegetation when plantings are finished, cleanses and cools the water before filtering into a nearby stream, Rettig said.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | May 25, 2009
Watershed association welcomes help of stay-at-home mom WASHINGTON County -- Mount Aetna Adventist Elementary School in Hagerstown and Greenbrier Elementary School in Boonsboro have received grants from the Chesapeake Bay Trust to construct schoolyard rain gardens. The rain gardens are intended to help provide proper drainage and filtration of water by purging chemicals and other contaminants before they enter area waterways and eventually the Chesapeake Bay, according to prepared information.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 9, 2006
WILLIAMSPORT Despite the cold and rainy weather, volunteers planted 300 trees Saturday morning at Byron Memorial Park. The mass planting was part of an ongoing effort to prevent water pollution caused by runoff, said Emily Cooper, a Western Maryland watershed forester with the Maryland Forest Service. Cooper said around 50 volunteers - including Williamsport Mayor James G. McCleaf II and several town council members - planted a rain garden and created what is known as a riparian buffer.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | June 15, 2007
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Perhaps it was fitting that rain slowly dampened the plans that Merle Holsinger was holding Thursday morning. The civil engineer walked around the site of a future rain garden, being funded with the Antietam Watershed Association's remaining $15,000 of its $100,000 Legacy Grant. The rain garden behind Summitview Elementary School will collect storm runoff from 64 acres surrounding it, said Stephen Rettig, president of the watershed association. The rain garden, which looks simply like an area of vegetation when plantings are finished, cleanses and cools the water before filtering into a nearby stream, Rettig said.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
Drying flowers workshop set for June 1 The Washington County Master Gardeners will offer a hands-on workshop on drying flowers Saturday, June 1, from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center at 7303 Sharpsburg Pike in Boonsboro.  The cost is $10.  Learn more by contacting Diane Woodring at 301-791-1504 or send an email to dwoodrin@umd.edu . Master Gardeners are volunteer educators with the University of...
NEWS
May 9, 2012
The Washington County Master Gardeners will hold a plant sale Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7303 Sharpsburg Pike in Boonsboro. The sale will feature hundreds of plants grown by master gardeners, new and used gardening books, tools and gifts, salad boxes and tours of the vegetable garden and rain garden. The plant sale will be held rain or shine. For more information, call 301-791-1604.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | February 15, 2006
WILLIAMSPORT - Two projects under way at Byron Memorial Park will prevent pollution caused by runoff, according to information provided at Monday's town council meeting. Officials on Monday presented plans to add a rain garden and what is called a riparian buffer to decrease sediment and water pollution. The park currently contains an unnamed tributary to the Conococheague Creek, said Jennifer K. Dotson, a spokeswoman for the Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin.
NEWS
April 13, 2010
The Washington County Master Gardeners will hold a plant sale Saturday, April 24, from 8 a.m. to noon at the Agricultural Education Center at 7303 Sharpsburg Pike. The sale will feature hundreds of plants grown by Master Gardeners including perennials, herbs, annuals, heirloom vegetables, houseplants and native plants. A garden market will feature new and used gardening books, tools, gifts and supplies. Rain barrels and salad boxes also will be available for sale. Cold frames will be on display and available by special order.
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NEWS
May 20, 2013
Drying flowers workshop set for June 1 The Washington County Master Gardeners will offer a hands-on workshop on drying flowers Saturday, June 1, from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center at 7303 Sharpsburg Pike in Boonsboro.  The cost is $10.  Learn more by contacting Diane Woodring at 301-791-1504 or send an email to dwoodrin@umd.edu . Master Gardeners are volunteer educators with the University of...
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NEWS
April 1, 2013
Did you know that we live in the Chesapeake Bay watershed? Everything we do in our gardens and homes affects the health of the bay and our waterways. It all matters. To improve water quality and conserve natural resources, we teach environmentally smart gardening techniques through the Bay-Wise program. Master Gardeners and I offer classes and do yard reviews to certify landscapes as Bay-Wise.   A Bay-Wise landscape is planted, watered, fertilized, mulched and mowed properly. Pests and runoff are managed responsibly.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | September 7, 2012
Issues such as local measures to help protect the Chesapeake Bay, what kind of trees to plant in an urban setting or educational programs such as how to develop a rain garden might get closer consideration now that the Town of Boonsboro has established an Environmental Commission. Boonsboro Town Council members Tuesday night agreed to create the commission, which has been talked about for about three years, council member Sean Haardt said. Environmental issues have gotten close consideration over the years in Boonsboro, where a recycling task force helped pave the way for curbside recycling in town.
NEWS
May 26, 2012
Julie Pippel, director of Washington County's Division of Environmental Management, provided the following ideas of steps that can be taken to help reduce nitrogen and phosphorous discharges into the Chesapeake Bay watershed: Test the lawn and flower and vegetable gardens to determine whether they need fertilizer and only add what is needed. Dog owners can scoop the waste, even in their own yards, and put it in the trash. Plant trees, which absorb nitrogen and phosphorous.
NEWS
May 9, 2012
The Washington County Master Gardeners will hold a plant sale Saturday from 8 a.m. to noon at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7303 Sharpsburg Pike in Boonsboro. The sale will feature hundreds of plants grown by master gardeners, new and used gardening books, tools and gifts, salad boxes and tours of the vegetable garden and rain garden. The plant sale will be held rain or shine. For more information, call 301-791-1604.
NEWS
May 1, 2012
May 1 to May 24 - Master Gardener training program; Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:30 to 8:45 p.m. Admittance into the program is based on completion of the application, a background check and an interview. Applications are available by contacting Karen Sechler at the University of Maryland Extension at 301-791-1604 or by email at ksechler@umd.edu. Growing Vegetables Series -   Thursday, May 10 - Grow the Best Tomatoes, 181 Franklin Farm Lane. All classes take place from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. and cost $10 each, or $30 if registering for all classes.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
The Washington County Master Gardeners will hold a plant sale Saturday, April 30, from 8 a.m. to noon at the Agricultural Education Center at 7303 Sharpsburg Pike. The plant sale will feature hundreds of plants grown by master gardeners, including perennials, herbs, annuals, heirloom vegetables, houseplants and native plants.   A garden market will feature new and used gardening books, tools, art, gifts and supplies. Salad boxes also will be available for sale.   Master gardener volunteers will share information on growing vegetables and creating a rain garden in the demonstration gardens at the Ag Center.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | May 16, 2010
HAGERSTOWN -- Fresh out of college, Shanon Wolf was planning for a garden. She headed to her local library and found a book that was the inspiration for a raised 4-by-4-foot garden that she planted in the backyard of her apartment. That experience more than 30 years ago led to one of her many gardening missions -- to dispel the myth that you need large property to have a garden. "You don't have to plow a half-acre. It's amazing the variety you can have in a tiny little space," said Wolf, 58. Wolf, who became a master gardener in 2008, shares her knowledge and skills at demonstration gardens at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center.
NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | May 11, 2010
What is a rain garden? It's a garden that captures and filters rainwater. And it's all the rage among those who want to protect the environment and keep pollution out of the Chesapeake Bay and other waterways. Rain gardens are sunken gardens planted with native plants. Placed so they collect rainwater from a downspout, these gardens slowly filter the water from your roof, preventing erosion, trapping pollution and restoring natural water flow. Traditional stormwater management emphasizes moving water away from a home as quickly as possible.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | April 23, 2010
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- To prevent possible flooding in the skate park area, the Morgan County Commission on Thursday unanimously approved the installation of a rain garden basin in the Berkeley Springs Bike and Skate Park on Ewing Street. The rain garden will be provided through a $5,000 grant from the Potomac Headwaters Resource Conservation and Development Council as a demonstration project, said Gordon MacLeod, a Morgan County Parks and Recreation board member. "We have to get started as soon as soon as possible" to be eligible for the grant, MacLeod said.
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