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Rain Barrel

NEWS
By JUDY NIEDZIELSKI, SANDY SCOTT and CELESTE MAIORANA | December 26, 2009
Forests purify Earth's air and water and provide food and shelter to many animals. Forests also provide open space for sport and recreation and provide products that help us to build our homes and live our lives. But forests' existence and health are threatened by development, pollution and invasive species. We need forests and they also need us. Fortunately, small actions by individuals can yield beneficial consequences for our forest communities. So please consider doing one or more of the following activities in the coming year: o Visit our public woodlands, alone, with a friend, or with children or grandchildren.
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NEWS
March 3, 2009
March 5, 12, 19 and 26 -- Beginning Beekeeping short course, five sessions, Franklin County Beekeepers, Franklin County Extension Office, 181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, Pa. Call 717-263-9226. March 6 and 7: 2009 Maryland Cattle Industry Convention and Central Maryland Hay and Pasture Conference at Hagerstown Hotel and Convention Center. More detailed program information and registration options are available at www.marylandcattle.org or by calling 410-795-5309.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | March 17, 2003
andrews@herald-mail.com At the rain barrel lecture, the crowd swelled. Forty or so seats filled early; stragglers stood. They came to Hagerstown Community College's Athletic, Recreation and Community Center on Saturday for the Ninth Annual Flower & Garden Show for the flowers, plants and accessories. Along the way, many took in other bits and pieces. At 11:30 a.m., Frederick County, Md., Master Gardener Bonnie Duggan talked about rainwater and how to conserve it. It's easy to use any large receptacle, such as a garbage can, to collect runoff water.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 26, 2011
A Waynesboro church is offering garden plots as an educational tool and an opportunity for people to grow their own food. The United Church of Christ Church of the Apostles on Barnett Avenue is creating plots that are 10 feet by 10 feet and 20 feet by 20 feet. There is no cost to use a plot for the season, and space is available to anyone who asks. The Bible is filled with agriculture and nature references related to lifestyles of that time, Pastor Michael Cromer said. "Of course, it starts with a garden," he said of the Bible.
NEWS
March 6, 2009
Tuesday, March 10 Rain barrel class CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -Franklin County Master Gardeners and the Franklin County Conservation District offer two "Constructing a Rain Barrel" classes. 9 to 11 a.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, March 10. Penn State Cooperative Extension Office, 181 Franklin Farm Lane. $25. Call 717-263-9226. Landlord crash course Hagerstown Community College's Center for Continuing Education offers a class for Washington County landlords discussing leases, lead paint laws, resources available to landlords, fair housing laws, tenant evictions and Hagerstown City Code enforcement.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | July 11, 2010
High temperatures stress area crops and livestock Record temperatures and long periods without rain could compromise backyard gardens across the region, experts say. Extreme heat and lack of rain put extra stress on vegetables and small fruits, said Steve Bogash, regional horticulture educator with Penn State University Cooperative Extension. Unlike vegetable fields on farms, few home gardens are irrigated, said Bogash, who offered some advice on watering. When possible, watering should be done early in the day before the temperature climbs, and it should be done for a long time and deep, Bogash said.
NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | April 18, 2011
In honor of Earth Day, I thought I'd share my top tips for environmentally friendly gardens. Gardeners can have a tremendous, positive impact on the environment by adopting a few simple practices that nourish, rather than harm, the world in which we live. Compost is the best thing you can add to your soil. It lightens the heavy clay soil, holds moisture, feeds beneficial soil creatures like earthworms and grows healthier plants. Making compost is as easy as layering food scraps, chopped leaves, grass clippings and other natural materials in a 3-foot pile and turning it occasionally.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | April 25, 2004
pepperb@herald-mail.com CLEAR SPRING - While passing out fliers to drivers Saturday for the Fairview Outdoor Education Center's 25th anniversary celebration at the entrance to the children's nature school, Alan Shane said he didn't mind that people passed him up. Humble about his role in Washington County Public Schools' only outdoor school, Shane, a retired county teacher who first took classes full of giddy children to a similar center...
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