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Pumpkin Pie

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LIFESTYLE
December 20, 2011
My paternal grandmother was a well-known cook, baker and hostess among family, friends and church circles. In addition to her culinary expertise, she knew every rule of etiquette and table-setting. One of her specialties was pumpkin pie. Having no daughters, she gave her recipe to my mother, who passed it on to me. With its mild flavor and creamy texture, this pie is now a favorite in my own family. It's easy, too. -   Linda Baker, member of the hand bell choir at Otterbein United Methodist Church in downtown Hagerstown Elizabeth Butler's pumpkin pie 1 3/4 cups pumpkin Scant teaspoon cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon ginger 1/2 teaspoon salt 3/4 cup sugar 2 eggs, beaten 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1 1/2 cups milk 9-inch pie shell Heat oven to 450 degrees.
NEWS
October 25, 2006
Pumpkin layer 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 medium-sized baking pumpkin or cushaw squash 1/3 cup sugar 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice (available at grocery store) 1 9-inch unbaked pie shell Pecan layer 2/3 cup corn syrup 2 eggs, lightly beaten 1/2 cup sugar 3 tablespoons butter, melted 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 cup pecan halves To prepare the pumpkin layer, cut pumpkin (or squash) into halves, removing the seeds and stem. Bake in oven for 350 degrees for 25 to 35 minutes until the pumpkin is fork tender.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | November 3, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com Pumpkin's not just for jack-o'-lanterns and pie anymore. There are a lot of options for the fall holiday fruit - breads, muffins and soups among them. A pumpkin, relieved of its seeds and stringy, slimy goo, can serve as a seasonal soup bowl or even a cooking container. Lynn F. Little, family and consumer sciences educator with Maryland Cooperative Extension in Washington County, has seen a recipe in which beef stew is baked inside pumpkins.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | October 25, 2006
It's that time of year when cooks start talking pumpkin. Just don't go overboard with the cinnamon, allspice and nutmeg - spice standards when it comes to pumpkin dishes. Also, go easy on the ginger and cloves. "You want to get a balance. You want it to still taste like pumpkin," said Perry Sanders, owner of Sanders' Cookie Jar Bakery on Pennsylvania Avenue. The fall fruit is easily adaptable for everyday recipes ranging from muffins to soup to chili, according to local bakers and pumpkin growers.
NEWS
November 5, 2007
Residents and staff at the Shook Home and the Quarters at the Shook got into the spirit of the season with a Fall Festival Celebration. Staff members donned costumes, served pumpkin pie and socialized with the residents of the continuing-care retirement community at 55 S. Second St. in Chambersburg, Pa. Pictured are resident Gladys Foreman, 8-month-old Haylie Gossert and Quarters personal care attendant Julie Gossert.
LIFESTYLE
December 14, 2010
Cookie base: 17 1/2-ounce package Betty Crocker oatmeal cookie mix 1/2 cup crushed gingersnap cookies 1/2 cup finely chopped pecans 1/2 cup cold butter or margarine Filling: 2 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened 1 cup sugar 1 cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix) 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice 2 tablespoons whipping cream 2 eggs Toppings: 1/3 cup chocolate topping 1/3 cup caramel topping   Heat oven to 350 degrees.
NEWS
November 12, 2008
WILLIAMSPORT - A dinner to help with the restoration of Riverview Cemetery will be Saturday from 3 to 7 p.m. at Williamsport United Methodist Church at 25 E. Church St. Tickets cost $6 per person for both eat in and takeout. The menu includes meatloaf, mashed potatoes, gravy, glazed carrots, applesauce, rolls and butter, pumpkin pie, coffee and iced tea. The cemetery recently was damaged by vandals who overturned a number of headstones. For ticket information, call 301-223-7040.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | November 26, 2003
katec@herald-mail.com Karen Stroup will be cooking two turkeys this Thanksgiving. A 12-pound bird will be roasted, and for the second time, she will deep-fry a 10-pound turkey. Stroup's expecting only 12 people at her table, not the 27 who came last year. Among them will be her son, who will be traveling from Harrisonburg, Va. Stroup, in her second year as principal at Sharpsburg Elementary School, says some of the 297 students in the school have found some time to talk about thankfulness.
NEWS
by KATE S. ALEXANDER/Staff Correspondent | October 15, 2006
WAYNESBORO, PA. - Waynesboro welcomed fall this weekend with pumpkin pie, pumpkin carving and, of course, pumpkin chucking. Renfrew Museum and Renfrew Institute hosted the 15th annual Pumpkin Festival on Saturday, where thousands of people enjoyed hayrides, live music, food and flying pumpkins. Sponsored by M&T Bank, the Pumpkin Festival is Renfrew's largest fundraiser. Planned months in advance, this year's festival included many new elements, including a pumpkin pie contest.
NEWS
May 23, 2004
3 cups flour 2 cups sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 teaspoons baking soda 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 4 eggs 1 cup cooking oil 2 cups (or a 15-ounce can) pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling) 1 cup chopped walnuts 6 ounces chocolate chips Whipped cream or frozen whipped topping Do not use an electric mixer. Stir all the dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the center of dry ingredients and add all the remaining ingredients.
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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | December 24, 2012
A foam meal tray is pulled from a tower of trays and moved down a row of tables, where someone places a slice of ham in the tray, and then another volunteer tops it with a slice of turkey. Then a scoop of stuffing, a spoonful of buttered green beans, a plop of roasted potatoes and a ladle full of gravy are added. The tray is closed and slid around the corner of tables, where someone packs it into a red reusable Meritus Health bag. Another container, holding a slice of pumpkin pie, a roll, cranberry sauce and whipped spread is added to the bag. At least 200 volunteers were busy cooking, packing and delivering hot meals Monday morning and afternoon for approximately 2,300 Washington County residents on Christmas Eve. This was the 11th year for the Lend-A-Hand Dinner sponsored by Meritus Medical Center's medical staff and Medical Emergency Professionals, which is the contracted group that staffs the medical center's Emergency Department, said Dr. Stephen Kotch from the medical center's Emergency Department.
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NEWS
October 22, 2012
Nothing conjures up autumn memories of our youth more than apples, brilliant leaf colors and pumpkins. The pumpkin is my topic today and it is more than a pie or a porch decoration. I hope you enjoy our investigation of this member of the Cucurbita family. Though they are often thought to be used solely as festive fall decorations, pumpkins are also nutritious and versatile fruit that can be found in many soups, stews and other hearty dishes. When fresh pumpkins are not available or convenient, canned pumpkin can be an alternative.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | October 2, 2012
Editor's note: This is part of an occasional series of stories on enticing picky eaters to eat vegetables. The series explores ways to highlight vegetables' flavor and appearance as a way to work around the resistance some kids have to eating vegetables. Doesn't everybody like pumpkin pie? Why include pumpkin in a series of stories about picky eaters? There's much more to pumpkin than pie. Pumpkin is a member of the squash family, and, like other squashes, it can be made savory or sweet.
LIFESTYLE
December 20, 2011
My paternal grandmother was a well-known cook, baker and hostess among family, friends and church circles. In addition to her culinary expertise, she knew every rule of etiquette and table-setting. One of her specialties was pumpkin pie. Having no daughters, she gave her recipe to my mother, who passed it on to me. With its mild flavor and creamy texture, this pie is now a favorite in my own family. It's easy, too. -   Linda Baker, member of the hand bell choir at Otterbein United Methodist Church in downtown Hagerstown Elizabeth Butler's pumpkin pie 1 3/4 cups pumpkin Scant teaspoon cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon ginger 1/2 teaspoon salt 3/4 cup sugar 2 eggs, beaten 2 tablespoons butter, melted 1 1/2 cups milk 9-inch pie shell Heat oven to 450 degrees.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | November 18, 2011
Stuffing on Thanksgiving Day won't kill you. Neither will the turkey, mashed potatoes, yams, cranberry sauce, biscuits, corn, green bean casserole, gravy, butter and pumpkin pie - with a dollop of whipped cream. In fact, some might argue that it's a human need to binge from time to time. But too much of a good thing - like holiday meals - can add a few extra pounds to the scale and it often results in post-dinner discomfort. It's called overeating. And it's the American way. Because it's the one day devoted to food, many people think they're given a pass to overindulge when they sit down at the Thanksgiving table, said Jeanne Rhodes, nutritionist, wellness consultant and director of Rhodes Preventive Health Institute in Hagerstown.
LIFESTYLE
December 14, 2010
Cookie base: 17 1/2-ounce package Betty Crocker oatmeal cookie mix 1/2 cup crushed gingersnap cookies 1/2 cup finely chopped pecans 1/2 cup cold butter or margarine Filling: 2 8-ounce packages cream cheese, softened 1 cup sugar 1 cup canned pumpkin (not pumpkin pie mix) 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon pumpkin pie spice 2 tablespoons whipping cream 2 eggs Toppings: 1/3 cup chocolate topping 1/3 cup caramel topping   Heat oven to 350 degrees.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | December 25, 2009
WILLIAMSPORT -- Friends and strangers gathered to share a free Christmas meal Friday at Rehoboth United Methodist Church in Williamsport. Neighbors James Barger and Diana LeVasseur said they drove from Hagerstown for the meal, which included turkey, ham, mashed potatoes, sauerkraut, stuffing and pumpkin pie. Barger said this Christmas was a little sadder than usual because his mother died in July. "It's my first Christmas without her," Barger said. "It's lonely without my mom. " LeVasseur said the Christmas dinner provided people with a place to enjoy fellowship.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | March 8, 2009
WILLIAMSPORT -- Monty R. Jones was so tired of cheesecake, he came up with his own version -- cranberry almond-brie with a puff-pastry crust. To be clear, Jones's cranberry almond brie pie neither resembles nor tastes like what you'd think of as a traditional cheesecake. The taste of the cheese is subdued and the almond is the most prominent flavor. There's a "twang" from the cranberry. Preparation for the pie isn't that much different from any other pie, and seemed pretty approachable for a person who's made a pie or two. The end result looks like what would happen if you made a massive fruit dumpling in a pie pan, except instead of thick flaps of pie crust, thin layers of puff pastry are folded to the center of the pie. Once sliced open, the inside looks like a pie-baklava hybrid, with striations of phyllo dough, cheese and cranberry-almond mix. Jones came up this recipe for Thanksgiving, when cranberries were plentiful.
NEWS
December 7, 2008
By OMNI VORE The dining room of the Railroad Junction at 808 Noland Street off U.S. 11, looks almost like a dining car on a train. When the clock on the wall strikes the hour, a train whistle blows. Pictures of trains in small frames line the paneled walls. Closer examination shows the pictures to be of the Western Maryland Railway Line, which had a roundhouse in Hagerstown. On my first visit, I could see that Railroad Junction was a comfortable kind of place. The first items listed on the menu were desserts; next came the daily specials -- slippery pot pie on Monday; hog maws and liver and onions on Tuesday; pork and sauerkraut on Wednesday; meatloaf and fried chicken on Thursday; a fish fry on Friday and ribs on Saturday.
NEWS
By OMNI VORE | December 7, 2008
The dining room of the Railroad Junction at 808 Noland Drive off U.S. 11, looks almost like a dining car on a train. When the clock on the wall strikes the hour, a train whistle blows. Pictures of trains in small frames line the paneled walls. Closer examination shows the pictures to be of the Western Maryland Railway Line, which had a roundhouse in Hagerstown. On my first visit, I could see that Railroad Junction was a comfortable kind of place. The first items listed on the menu were desserts; next came the daily specials - slippery pot pie on Monday; hog maws and liver and onions on Tuesday; pork and sauerkraut on Wednesday; meatloaf and fried chicken on Thursday; a fish fry on Friday and ribs on Saturday.
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