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NEWS
Meg Partington | March 5, 2011
When my son recently put his glasses on for the first time, all he could say was "Whoa!" It was the same reaction I had in seventh grade when the world was transformed from somewhat blurry to dizzyingly clear. I told him I remembered riding in the front passenger seat of my mom's car on the way home from the optician's office and feeling like I was seeing a 3-D movie. That struck a chord with him, as the world in which he has sprouted is so multidimensional. The only things that are "flat" to him are the ground on which he walks and the screen of the television that provides my husband with all the high-definition sports he can stand.
SPORTS
August 26, 2012
Ashley Grier had birdies on the opening hole each day of the Challenge at Musket Ridge but the end result was a little different on Sunday. After two even-par rounds of 72, Grier finished the Symetra Tour at 3-over-par 75 for a 219 card in her first tour competition since the end of the 2010 season. “All in all, I'm still happy how things went,” said Grier, who enjoyed playing in front of many friends and family. Grier had received a special exemption to participate in the Challenge at Musket Ridge and she responded by finishing tied for 46th in the field of 110 golfers.
NEWS
September 2, 2004
Washington County Commissioner Doris Nipps on Tuesday defended the secrecy surrounding the two-on-two talks that produced the blueprint for progress unveiled that night. Often in the past, she said, bits of information were used to create headlines that tended to create mistrust between the parties trying to negotiate. That suggests that it is the media's fault that it took so long to achieve progress. We suggest another explanation: In 2003, Judge Fred Thayer ruled that Hagerstown couldn't enforce its annexation policy in areas where it had already agreed to provide service.
OPINION
August 28, 2013
On Aug. 28, 1963, a Wednesday, Martin Luther King Jr. stepped to a microphone in front of a quarter of a million people on the Mall in Washington, D.C. The incredible crowd had assembled for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and no doubt sensed that something historic was in the air. Fifty years ago, Jim Crow laws governed racial relations in the South. On their face, they called for separate but equal facilities for black and white, but while definitely separate they were nowhere near equal.
NEWS
September 20, 2012
Police reported progress in their investigation, but no arrests as of Thursday in the shooting death of Calvin Warren James Beam. Police have made “significant progress in the investigation,” Chambersburg Police Chief David Arnold said Thursday afternoon in a news release. “We have had many calls with information and leads provided for us by the public,” Arnold said in the release. The investigation is continuing, Arnold said. An autopsy was performed Wednesday in Allentown, Pa.. The results were not available Thursday.
NEWS
June 23, 2011
One lane of traffic is closed Thursday on sections of Clear Spring Road (Md. 68) between National Pike (U.S. 40) in Clear Spring to Big Pool Road (Md. 56) in Pinesburg. Slurry pavement is being put on the road in that area, according to the Maryland State Highway Administration's website. All the markings were being removed from the road Thursday morning, said Brian Devilbiss of Slurry Paving Inc. After that, workers will begin laying down the slurry pavement. Slurry pavement is a thin-layered pavement that can be put on top of asphalt.
NEWS
September 3, 2009
Construction on a regional medical center on Robinwood Drive, replacing the current Washington County Hospital, has passed the halfway point, hospital spokeswoman Nicole Jovel said. Work on the project still is expected to be finished by December 2010. There has been no estimate on when the regional medical center will open.
NEWS
by KEVIN G. GILBERT / Staff Photographer | June 5, 2007
Now that warmer weather is here, work has picked up at the site of the new Boonsboro Library on Md. 34. The 10,000-square-foot building - being built for an estimated $2.3 million - sits on land donated by the town. Builders are shooting for a grand opening in early fall.
NEWS
May 23, 2012
Negotiators for the Waynesboro Area School Board and its teachers' union expressed optimism for a contract resolution after meeting Wednesday. The two sides are nearing the 700th day since the last teachers' contract expired. The school board and union, Waynesboro Area Education Association, released a joint statement following their negotiating session with former Fairfield (Pa.) Area School District Superintendent Gary Miller. The statement signed by WAEA President Mike Engle and school board attorney Richard Galtman stated: “The parties met with Dr. Miller at his home on Wednesday, May 23, 2012.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | March 18, 2007
Some years ago, a consultant working on the marketing of downtown Hagers-town asked me what I felt the biggest obstacle to progress there was. In a nutshell, I said that it was tendency to remember the downtown of the past and avoid it in the present because it would never agaian be the glorious, bustling center of commerce that it once was. In other words, the memory of what downtown once was was preventing people from seeing what it...
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OPINION
August 28, 2013
On Aug. 28, 1963, a Wednesday, Martin Luther King Jr. stepped to a microphone in front of a quarter of a million people on the Mall in Washington, D.C. The incredible crowd had assembled for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and no doubt sensed that something historic was in the air. Fifty years ago, Jim Crow laws governed racial relations in the South. On their face, they called for separate but equal facilities for black and white, but while definitely separate they were nowhere near equal.
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OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | July 10, 2013
I look at Municipal Stadium each day much as the Federals must have looked at Fort Sumter every morning - to see if the flag was still flying, or if the place had succumbed overnight to those hated Virginians. Or South Carolinians, or whoever. How long can Col. Robert E. Bruchey II hold out against those vandals who seem to be waging a war of attrition? And will the City Hall gunboats arrive in time to save the day, or will they just keep running into each other because no one knows who's in charge?
NEWS
By Capital News Service | April 14, 2013
If the longstanding rumors are true and Gov. Martin O'Malley really does have his sights set on a presidential nomination, the 2013 legislative session could go a long way toward solidifying his liberal qualifications for a Democratic primary electorate. The list of legislation from the 2013 session reads like a progressive's wish list: Pass some of the strictest gun-control laws in the country, repeal the death penalty, legalize medical marijuana, increase taxes on gasoline and subsidize offshore wind power.
SPORTS
By ANDREW MASON | andrewm@herald-mail.com | March 28, 2013
The Williamsport wrestling team was at its best when it counted the most - at the end of the season. After compiling a very respectable 18-6 dual-meet record, the Wildcats went into late-winter tourney mode. They held off defending champion North Hagerstown to capture the Clyde Downs Trophy at the Washington County tournament, and then advanced nearly their entire lineup (12 of their 14 starters) to the Maryland 2A-1A West region tournament. “That's always one of our major team goals, to win the county title and take home the Clyde Downs Trophy,” Williamsport coach Mike Rechtorovic said.
OPINION
By U.S. SEN. BEN CARDIN | March 17, 2013
March is Women's History Month, a time we usually celebrate or honor a specific woman in history. This year, I would like to do something different. I would like to focus on domestic violence, an issue that has received a lot of attention in recent months because of legislation in Congress to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act. I want to use this opportunity to gain a greater understanding of the issue, the progress we have made since the 1980s and what still needs to be done. Until the 1970s, there really was very little attention paid to domestic violence in our nation.
NEWS
February 28, 2013
A bill introduced by Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, in the House seeking to change state law so that a county's sheriff or the chief of a county's primary law enforcement agency is notified before a warrant is served within its jurisdiction by another agency has died in committee after it received an unfavorable report from the House Judiciary Committee. That means the bill will not make any progress in the current session of the Maryland General Assembly. The legislators have said previously that their bill was in response to a November incident in Sharpsburg where Maryland State Police served a no-knock search warrant as they searched for Terry Porter, of 4433 Mills Road near Sharpsburg but did not inform the Washington County Sheriff before the operation commenced.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | February 8, 2013
Washington Township Board of Supervisors met with Pennsylvania state lawmakers and other local leaders Friday as part of its annual planning meeting. Township Manager Michael Christopher said the all-day meeting, which was held in the Washington Township Municipal Building on Welty Road, sets the direction for the township in the coming year and opens up a dialogue with local leaders and legislators. Rep. Todd Rock, R-Franklin, and Sen. Richard Alloway, R-Franklin/Adams/York, were among those who addressed the meeting weighing in on a range of topics including the state budget, transportation and the implication of both on the township.
SPORTS
By TIM KOELBLE | koelble@herald-mail.com | January 28, 2013
For someone who never played basketball heading into high school, Nnamdi Enechionyia has fared quite well for himself. So well, in fact, that the 6-foot-6 Saint James senior has made a verbal commitment to play basketball next season at Samford University, a Division I school in Birmingham, Ala., in the Southern Conference. It's rather amazing that Enechionyia has progressed with rapidity, considering basketball was not on his radar several years ago. “It's a dream come true to get a full scholarship,” Enechionyia said.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | January 20, 2013
William and Thomas Towson, who farmed the fields along present-day Joppa and York roads, wouldn't recognize the community that bears their name today. Towsontown was born as something of a way station for farmers driving herds of livestock and wagons of grain and vegetables south to the Port of Baltimore, and in the 250 years hence, the community of 55,000 has participated in a boom-and-bust pattern recognizable to small cities along the Eastern Seaboard, Hagerstown included. Today, leaders in Towson hope that people who were familiar with the Towson of the 2000s won't recognize it two or three years hence.
NEWS
December 3, 2012
Paving work on Raleigh Street, primarily between Burke and Race streets in Martinsburg, is expected to continue Tuesday as part of the Raleigh Street Extension project. The extension of North Raleigh Street to Edwin Miller Boulevard is expected to be open to traffic when completed next year. - Matthew Umstead
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