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OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | July 8, 2012
Hagerstown says that the results of its automated speed cameras are “better than expected.” Great. So let's quit while we're ahead. The dangers and potential for abuse with for-profit justice would seem to be self-evident, but so many communities (and the private corporations that are egging them on) have been finding clever ways of selling the public a bill of goods, that perhaps a review is in order. It all starts with the children, of course. We put up cameras, just a few, to operate during the school day. Or maybe a little more ... you know, just a little safety overlap, so we can reduce police hours.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | February 21, 2012
On the eve of Y2K, Jeanne Dietz-Band was a molecular biologist living in Montgomery County and working in the Washington, D.C., area. Now she lives on Many Rocks Farm, a small farm near Keedysville, and runs a successful food-based business. She raises goats for meat and milk, and, recently, she expanded into raising heritage livestock. "I was raised in Kansas and wanted to get back to the farm," Dietz-Band said. The first few years after Dietz-Band and her husband, Allan Band, moved to Keedysville, they built fences, outbuildings and other farm infrastructure.
NEWS
November 28, 2001
Waynesboro Hospital turns profit in 2000 WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Waynesboro Hospital, which lost nearly $1 million in the 2000 budget year, is now back in the black, officials said Tuesday. The hospital ended its budget year with an operating surplus of $594,646 on June 30, 2001. A year earlier, the hospital reported an operating loss of $906,017. An increase in patients combined with efforts to control costs contributed to the turnaround, hospital officials said.
NEWS
By TERRY TALBERT | May 20, 1998
by Richard T. Meagher / staff photographer see the enlargement Salem Avenue Elementary School teacher Rose Minnick was lying in bed one night last winter when an idea struck. She could teach her fourth-grade students how to run a small business. "I've heard of other teachers doing for-profit type things. I thought I could do it here," said Minnick, a Hagerstown resident. With $250 of her own money, Minnick bought supplies. Then, 36 students from her homeroom and a co-worker's class made Christmas ornaments from scratch during social studies periods.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | February 16, 2000
A proposed tip jar law change supported Wednesday by state lawmakers could result in more people gambling on larger tip jar games, which would make more money available for distribution to charities. cont. from front page The proposal was applauded Wednesday by some of the people who would be most affected by the change, including the director of the Washington County Gaming Commission and owners of local liquor stores and bars. Carmen Harbaugh, who sells tip jars wholesale at Harbaugh Coin Machines in Hagerstown, predicted bar owners would like the proposed change, which the local delegation approved Wednesday.
NEWS
By JOSHUA BOWMAN | September 7, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Gamblers in Washington County spent about $71.7 million on tip jar games in fiscal year 2007, according to a report released this week by the Washington County Gaming Commission. That total was $1.2 million less than players spent last fiscal year. The report details the number of tip jars sold, gross revenue and gross profit for each business that operated tip jars in fiscal year 2007. The Improved Order of Red Men Conococheague Tribe 84 was the biggest tip jar operator in the county, selling more than $8.4 million in tickets in fiscal year 2007.
NEWS
July 28, 2002
Allegheny Energy Allegheny Energy Inc. plans to release its second-quarter 2002 earnings Tuesday and will hold its analyst conference call to discuss earnings results at 1 p.m. Wednesday. Investors and others may listen to a live Internet broadcast of the call at 222.alleghenyenergy.com or www.streetevents.com. The call will also be archived for replay purposes for 10 working days after the live broadcast on both of these Web sites. A news release on the earnings and supporting financial data will also be available on the company's Web site for review.
NEWS
By DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | February 17, 1999
The winter months have drawn skaters to the Hagerstown Ice & Sports Complex, which has recorded its first profitable month in a year. The skating rink made a profit in January and is expected to be profitable again this month, said Gary Wright, chairman of the Washington County Sports Foundation, which oversees the operation of the rink. The rink last showed a profit in January 1998 and almost broke even the following month. But Wright said this year's figures are better and are an indicator of the rink's increasing popularity and its long-term success.
NEWS
February 21, 2008
The co-owner of South Pointe Wine & Spirits on East Oak Ridge Drive in Hagerstown told Washington County liquor officials Wednesday that she needed to move her store because business was too slow to turn a profit. "After five years of being there, we've just come to the conclusion it's not a good location," said Nicole Prum, co-owner of South Pointe. Robert L. Everhart, chairman of the Board of License Commissioners for Washington County, said Prum could apply to move her business, but the board would not make any guarantees.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | August 15, 2007
Sheriff's Department reports to Council WILLIAMSPORT - The Washington County Sheriff's Department's resident deputies responded to 104 complaints in July in Williamsport, according to a report presented Monday at the Williamsport Town Council meeting. Deputies issued 13 speeding tickets, eight other tickets and 12 warnings. Deputies arrested two adults and charged two people with driving while intoxicated or under the influence. One person allegedly drove under the influence of heroin, according to the report.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | September 2, 2013
It took two big grills to cook the 250 steaks and another one for the 175 slices of country ham to feed the crowd of more than 400 people at Monday's annual Labor Day breakfast at War Memorial Park in Martinsburg. Harold Catrow, a volunteer at the event, said it  was the 41st year for the event, which has become a standard fundraiser to benefit the park. Bonn A. “Buzz” Poland, another longtime breakfast volunteer, said an average profit each year runs between $8,000 and $10,000.
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NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | August 11, 2013
In July, almost 25 years to the day he and his wife bought their first house to fix up and flip for a profit, Tim Fields was back at that same property. But this time, with his house-flipping days long over and the recession having dismantled his small empire as one of Washington County's top custom homebuilders, Fields was back for a different reason - to power wash the back porch. Quite an economic comedown for the man who was president of the Home Builders Association of Washington County from 2004 through 2007.
SPORTS
July 13, 2012
The Hagerstown Suns should have figured they were in trouble. The Suns should have got a clue when they started throwing the ball farther than Greensboro was hitting it. Hagerstown committed consecutive throwing errors on a pair of balls hit in the infield to open the door for a six-run fourth inning for Greensboro on Friday, leading to a 7-2 loss. After allowing leadoff singles to Aaron Senne and Ryan Rieger, Hagerstown's starting pitcher Bobby Hansen Jr. fired Austin Nola's sacrifice bunt and Terrence Dayleg's single to the mound down the right-field line to start an improbable rally.
OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | July 8, 2012
Hagerstown says that the results of its automated speed cameras are “better than expected.” Great. So let's quit while we're ahead. The dangers and potential for abuse with for-profit justice would seem to be self-evident, but so many communities (and the private corporations that are egging them on) have been finding clever ways of selling the public a bill of goods, that perhaps a review is in order. It all starts with the children, of course. We put up cameras, just a few, to operate during the school day. Or maybe a little more ... you know, just a little safety overlap, so we can reduce police hours.
NEWS
May 8, 2012
Food for Profit, a one-day workshop, will be held Wednesday, June 6, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Washington County Agricultural Education Center (building door No. 4), at 7303 Sharpsburg Pike. The workshop is designed to help participants work through the maze of local and state regulations, food safety issues, and business management concepts that all must be considered in setting up a commercial food business.  The Penn State Extension's course is co-sponsored by Maryland Rural Enterprise Development Center, University of Maryland Extension and Hagerstown-Washington County Economic Development Commission.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | February 21, 2012
On the eve of Y2K, Jeanne Dietz-Band was a molecular biologist living in Montgomery County and working in the Washington, D.C., area. Now she lives on Many Rocks Farm, a small farm near Keedysville, and runs a successful food-based business. She raises goats for meat and milk, and, recently, she expanded into raising heritage livestock. "I was raised in Kansas and wanted to get back to the farm," Dietz-Band said. The first few years after Dietz-Band and her husband, Allan Band, moved to Keedysville, they built fences, outbuildings and other farm infrastructure.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Have you ever been told that your favorite homemade bread or salsa is “good enough to sell?” Do you have additional fruit or vegetables from your farm or home garden that you would like to make into a commercial product?  Food for Profit is a one-day workshop designed to help you work through the maze of local and state regulations, food safety issues and business management concepts that all must be considered in setting up a commercial food business.  The course will be held at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7303 Sharpsburg Pike (building door No. 4)
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | December 21, 2011
The president of a for-profit cheer and dance business told The Herald-Mail that the volunteer fire company in Hagerstown had been sending a monthly check to his business in return for the parents of youth cheerleaders working in the fire company's gaming operation. The money was used to help families offset the cost of cheer and dance training and competition, said Scott Braasch, president and co-owner of the Pennsylvania-based Cheer Tyme Inc. Jim Hovis, director of the Washington County Office of Community Grant Management, said he began a preliminary investigation into the matter about three weeks ago after The Herald-Mail asked him about the situation.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | August 25, 2011
It's not often you hear a pastor promote Christianity and capitalism in the same breath. But in his book, "God Gave Capitalism to You," the Rev. Jim Morrison tries to correct what he sees as a popular misperception: "Profit is not profane, it is not obscene. Profit is a good thing, it is not inherently evil. In fact, in Scripture both production and profit are lauded, not lampooned or forbidden. " Morrison is a senior pastor of Mount Pleasant Church of God in Smithsburg.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 13, 2011
By offering a cyber charter school operated by four public-school districts, the Waynesboro Area School Board could reduce its annual costs for sending students to for-profit schools online, a Franklin Virtual Academy official told the board this week. Todd Tritle administers Franklin Virtual Academy through the Greencastle-Antrim School District. The Chambersburg Area, Waynesboro Area and Fannett-Metal school districts are preparing to join the academy through a consortium formed this year in Franklin County, Pa. "Online learning is growing rapidly at 30 percent annually.
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