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OPINION
June 21, 2013
It's a question with no correct answer. Is the loss of our privacy a valid price to pay for greater security? Or, as Ben Franklin once suggested, are those who sacrifice one for the other bound to lose both? The NSA claims that it is only collecting metadata, described as “data about data.” Theoretically, this is one step removed from more egregious acts of eavesdropping that involve listening into phone conversations or reading email. And because the NSA wants the metadata, it too must be revealing.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say This coming Monday is a national holiday obviously, but it is an important date for another reason: It is being billed as Quit Facebook Day. A number of people, who apparently live lives so free of conflict that they have nothing better to fret over, are concerned about what they see as Facebook's slack privacy measures. So they are hoping to encourage waves of people to quit the social networking site, extracting some measure of revenge over the Internet monolith.
NEWS
By Tim Rowland | December 6, 2010
By all accounts, this WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, is a real — well, see last name, first syllable. Which is probably why I like him. I don’t quite believe the contention that he’s about to bring down the civilized world as we know it. To my mind, he’s just kind of extending into government circles the same realities all of us peons are dealing with, to wit: There is no right of privacy anymore; get over it. If you...
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | December 7, 2012
To no one's surprise, the right of privacy came into question by diehards of the right in the recent election cycle. Conservative politicians have promised to undo Roe v. Wade, which is grounded on this right. Ever since Roe v. Wade became law, there have been conservative writers (e.g. George Will) who belittle its legitimacy and assert that it is a “newly discovered” right. This canard is repeated by male-dominated legislatures, male-dominated courts and male-dominated organizations.
NEWS
By DON AINES | January 16, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A man charged with surreptitiously photographing at least one co-worker in the restroom of the business where they worked has waived his mandatory arraignment in Franklin County Court and was listed for the March trial term. Andrew Edward Gahagan, 33, formerly of Chambersburg, is charged with four misdemeanor counts of second-degree invasion of privacy. His attorney, Eric J. Weisbrod, said his client, who has since moved out of the area, waived his Wednesday arraignment by mail.
OPINION
June 10, 2013
So the government has been tracking every single Verizon phone call for seven years. That explains how Michelle Obama got her mitts on my secret bread pudding recipe. Actually that's not completely true. I don't even have Verizon. I have the cellphone carrier that works everywhere in the entire world except for your own house. But I don't like to talk to anyone in the first place, so it's not an issue. Nevertheless, the president and Congress were scrambling over the weekend to put a smiley face on the news that the National Security Agency has engaged in a secret surveillance program that has collected the telephone records of tens of millions of Verizon customers.
NEWS
By ALLAN POWELL | June 27, 2009
President Obama set the stage for a surge in speculation on May 1, when he made comments about the retirement of Justice David H. Souter. "I will seek someone who understands that justice isn't about some abstract legal theory or footnote in a casebook, it is also about how our laws affect the daily realities of people's lives - whether they can make a living and care for their families, whether they feel safe in their homes and welcome in...
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | December 4, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A Harpers Ferry, W.Va., man was charged Friday with placing a hidden camera in his bathroom so he could record his roommate getting ready to take showers, according to records filed in Berkeley County Magistrate Court. Allen Gibson, 56, of 840 Kidwiler Road, was charged with 12 misdemeanor counts of criminal invasion of privacy. West Virginia State Police Trooper M.L. Dickerson started an investigation after Julien Hubert spoke to police on May 9. Hubert called police after he found a camera hidden in the ventilation grate in the home's bathroom.
NEWS
By ROSE BENNETT GILBERT / Creators Syndicate | June 5, 2009
Q: My son, his wife and 3-year-old are moving in with us for a while (due to the economy), and we are looking for ways to give each family as much privacy as possible. We have two spare bedrooms, but we will need to share the common spaces like the kitchen and dining area - which can be dicey because my European-born husband likes to eat late (around 9), while the baby needs to be fed and in bed before then. How can we divvy up the space without real construction? They hope to be back on their own in a few months.
NEWS
February 26, 2006
If you are president of the United States of America, you know the bar has been set pretty low when a commentator praises your performance in the State of the Union address because you "came off as basically competent," as Tom Shales wrote this month in The Washington Post. So it is with George Bush, the Republican's Jimmy Carter. He's nice enough and he may mean well, but you also realize he's in about six miles over his head. Ideologues on the right will defend the president just because he is a Republican.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
BY HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | June 26, 2013
The disappearance of a 49-year-old Frederick County, Md., woman who had been missing since June 19 but was found late Tuesday night was not the result of criminal activity, the Frederick County Sheriff's Office said Wednesday. Teresa Lentz was found alive and unharmed in Spotsylvania County, Va., Tuesday night, following an intensive “around-the-clock” search, the sheriff's office said in a news release. Lentz's disappearance “was not a result of criminal activity and her travel out of our jurisdiction was a choice she made willingly,” the release said.
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OPINION
June 21, 2013
It's a question with no correct answer. Is the loss of our privacy a valid price to pay for greater security? Or, as Ben Franklin once suggested, are those who sacrifice one for the other bound to lose both? The NSA claims that it is only collecting metadata, described as “data about data.” Theoretically, this is one step removed from more egregious acts of eavesdropping that involve listening into phone conversations or reading email. And because the NSA wants the metadata, it too must be revealing.
OPINION
June 10, 2013
So the government has been tracking every single Verizon phone call for seven years. That explains how Michelle Obama got her mitts on my secret bread pudding recipe. Actually that's not completely true. I don't even have Verizon. I have the cellphone carrier that works everywhere in the entire world except for your own house. But I don't like to talk to anyone in the first place, so it's not an issue. Nevertheless, the president and Congress were scrambling over the weekend to put a smiley face on the news that the National Security Agency has engaged in a secret surveillance program that has collected the telephone records of tens of millions of Verizon customers.
OPINION
By ALLAN POWELL | December 7, 2012
To no one's surprise, the right of privacy came into question by diehards of the right in the recent election cycle. Conservative politicians have promised to undo Roe v. Wade, which is grounded on this right. Ever since Roe v. Wade became law, there have been conservative writers (e.g. George Will) who belittle its legitimacy and assert that it is a “newly discovered” right. This canard is repeated by male-dominated legislatures, male-dominated courts and male-dominated organizations.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | September 29, 2011
Starting Saturday, Meritus Medical Center will no longer release information about patients' conditions to the media, the hospital announced Thursday. The change is meant to protect patients' privacy and safety, Meritus Communications Manager Nicole Jovel said. Currently, when a caller inquires about a patient by name, hospital staff members are authorized to provide the patient's health condition in general terms such as "critical," "serious," "fair," or "good," provided that the patient has not asked the hospital to withhold that information.
NEWS
By Tim Rowland | December 6, 2010
By all accounts, this WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange, is a real — well, see last name, first syllable. Which is probably why I like him. I don’t quite believe the contention that he’s about to bring down the civilized world as we know it. To my mind, he’s just kind of extending into government circles the same realities all of us peons are dealing with, to wit: There is no right of privacy anymore; get over it. If you...
NEWS
November 17, 2010
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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | June 9, 2010
FUNKSTOWN -- A 6-foot privacy fence might be installed at Joker's Pub & Grill to close off its second entrance and provide an enclosed outdoor patio, Funkstown Mayor Paul N. Crampton Jr. said Monday night. The issue came up at the mayor and council work session because the steps are in the town's right-of-way so the business needs an easement from the town for the fence, Crampton said. Crampton asked Town Clerk/Treasurer Brenda L. Haynes to see if anything was needed from the Washington County liquor board or fire marshal's offices before the council makes a decision.
NEWS
May 24, 2010
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say This coming Monday is a national holiday obviously, but it is an important date for another reason: It is being billed as Quit Facebook Day. A number of people, who apparently live lives so free of conflict that they have nothing better to fret over, are concerned about what they see as Facebook's slack privacy measures. So they are hoping to encourage waves of people to quit the social networking site, extracting some measure of revenge over the Internet monolith.
NEWS
By ROSE BENNETT GILBERT / Creators Syndicate | October 16, 2009
Q: I don't have a clue about what to do with the six windows in our dining room alcove. We are right on the street corner, so we need something for privacy, but I refuse to keep the windows covered all the time. Suggestions, please! A: You have a number of viable options, ranging from a one-way window film that lets you look out but not in, to the kind of acrobatic, bottoms-up solution that is pictured. The floor-to-ceiling windows in the pictured dining room are dressed from the waist down, so to speak, ensuring privacy but leaving the upper half of the windows open to the outside light.
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