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NEWS
October 23, 2009
VA center's drive-through flu shot clinic closes MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The Martinsburg Veterans Affairs Center's "Drive-Thru Flu Shot Clinic" closed Friday. The seasonal flu vaccine still will be available to eligible veterans through the recommendation of their primary care physician, according at a VA Medical Center press release. For enrolled veterans who do not have a scheduled primary care appointment within the next month, the VA Medical Center's Primary Care and Community Based Outpatient clinics are offering walk-in flu shot clinics.
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | March 26, 2006
HAGERSTOWN It's been a year since Washington County Hospital inaugurated a program that puts doctors specializing in hospital care on staff at all hours. The "hospitalist" program had two approaches, hospital officials said. One was to provide consistent care for people who did not have a primary care physician. The other was to give primary care physicians a break - between the time they spent seeing patients in their own offices and making rounds at the hospital, "it wasn't uncommon for them to have to spend 18-hour days," said Kelsey M. Wilkes, director of integrated patient support services.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | February 24, 2009
Bill would clarify students' religious rights ANNAPOLIS -- Del. John P. Donoghue has sponsored a bill that would help doctors repay their student loans by charging patients an additional fee. The legislation would require patients to be charged .001 times their bill -- or $1 per every $1,000. That money would go to a fund to help doctors repay loans they have accumulated during medical school, which average about $150,000, according to the Maryland Hospital Association.
NEWS
July 29, 1997
By DON AINES Staff Writer, Martinsburg CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Many injuries and illnesses occur when most doctors' offices are closed, but they don't always require a trip to the emergency room. That's the reasoning behind a proposal for an urgent care center in Charles Town, which recently received a certificate of need from the West Virginia Health Department's Health Care Authority, allowing it to go forward with the project. Jefferson Urgent Care, a joint venture between Jefferson Memorial Hospital and Medical Management Solutions Inc., hopes to open the center by Oct. 1. "Jefferson County has been in need of primary care for some time.
NEWS
February 16, 1998
Renovation costs put health center move in doubt Plans to move the Potomac Street Community Health Center into the basement of the Martin Luther King Jr. Center on West North Street in Hagerstown have hit a snag. Expensive measures to remove lead paint and asbestos would be required at the King building, said hospital spokesman John Costopoulos. Costopoulos said the hospital hasn't ruled out the King building, which is owned by Washington County. The hospital is looking at three downtown alternatives, including the YMCA building on North Potomac Street.
NEWS
March 4, 1999
Employees must be partners To the editor: Rising health care costs are an epidemic facing the entire nation. In certain respects, as incredible as this may sound, that is a good thing, because new technologies and treatments are available to our citizens which prolong and improve the quality of life. Yet, we know that such advances come with a price tag and yes, we all pay for it. It is also true that there are certain areas of escalating health care costs which cannot be so easily justified and for which controls should be adopted.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | March 15, 2006
ANNAPOLIS - Despite a special legislative session and the passage last year of legislation to establish a stop-gap fund to stem escalating malpractice premiums for the state's physicians, doctors say the state's malpractice climate has not changed. And in Washington County, the hospital staff picks up the slack for doctors who no longer exercise their hospital privileges, according to Hagerstown surgeon Karl Riggle. In testimony submitted to the House Judiciary Committee Tuesday, Riggle said more than 80 percent of the primary care physicians in Hagerstown no longer see patients in the hospital.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE, Waynesboro | September 7, 1999
MERCERSBURG, Pa. - A shortage of office space for physicians in Mercersburg has prompted Summit Health, the owner of Chambersburg and Waynesboro hospitals, to build a $1.1 million medical center in this southern Franklin County community. [cont. from news page ] "We want to keep primary care health services in the community," said John J. McElwee, Jr., vice president of Summit Health. Ground was broken in July for the new 8,500-square-foot Mercersburg Health Center on Pa. 75 north of town.
NEWS
By LEE BOWMAN / Scripps Howard News Service | December 12, 2008
In some families, it's as straightforward as a 13-year-old declaring him or herself too old to continue seeing a "baby doctor. " For others, the reality of a sexually transmitted disease or a substance abuse problem makes it apparent that a teen suddenly requires services that are, at best, awkward to obtain from a practice with coloring books and toy boxes in the waiting room. But even if parents and teen patients agree that a new doctor is needed, finding a provider who can serve as a medical bridge to adulthood can be daunting.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | January 18, 2005
trishr@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Many people living in Morgan County might not be aware that War Memorial Hospital has much of the same state-of-the-art equipment as other, bigger hospitals, a War Memorial official said. Neil McLaughlin, the hospital's director of patient services, said the hospital offers CT scans and MRIs, so there's no need to travel when a doctor prescribes testing to help diagnose a problem. The hospital administrator, John Borg, who has been a board member since 1989, said War Memorial is a critical access hospital, offering primary access care and diagnostics.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
July 8, 2012
Health-care law will grow on all of us To the editor: Am I pleased about the Supreme Court decision on the Affordable Care Act? Well, yes! I expected the opposite outcome. Am I satisfied? Well, no! As a Pragmatic Progressive, I will accept this as “The law of the land” and strive to make it work. I do believe we will all be better off by having this arrangement imposed on our health-care system. I would have preferred single payer, because I believe that the health insurance industry has exploited the consumers, the providers and the United States by polluting our political process with uncountable lobbying dollars.
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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 23, 2010
FREDERICK, Md. -- Amy Hutchens placed a pair of her father's shoes on the lectern to illustrate the passionate, productive life he led. While wearing those shoes, Dr. Dan McDougal never retreated from a battle and he walked miles of hospital hallways in the name of healing, Hutchens said Saturday during a memorial service for him. Each day, those shoes led McDougal home to his family, she said. McDougal -- the former medical director at Antietam Health Services and the Community Free Clinic of Washington County and an unabashed advocate for health care access and addiction treatment -- died May 10 at age 64. He had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a degenerative condition commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
October 23, 2009
VA center's drive-through flu shot clinic closes MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The Martinsburg Veterans Affairs Center's "Drive-Thru Flu Shot Clinic" closed Friday. The seasonal flu vaccine still will be available to eligible veterans through the recommendation of their primary care physician, according at a VA Medical Center press release. For enrolled veterans who do not have a scheduled primary care appointment within the next month, the VA Medical Center's Primary Care and Community Based Outpatient clinics are offering walk-in flu shot clinics.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | October 20, 2009
TRI-STATE -- Four Tri-State health care professionals said they favor health insurance coverage for all. James P. Hamill, president and CEO of Washington County Health System, the parent company of Washington County Hospital, said there are three key issues -- keeping costs down, trying to obtain health care coverage for everyone and taking a comprehensive approach to heading off illness. "Getting as close to universal care as we can is going to be critical," Hamill said, noting the large number of people in America without health insurance.
NEWS
October 16, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- On track to see more than 3,000 patients this year, the Eastern Panhandle Free Clinic has frozen eligibility screening until January 2010 in order to meet existing demand for services, including flu season needs, organization officials said Friday. "Our goal is to provide quality comprehensive care to all of our patients, but this can only be met by ensuring timely care," said Michele Goldman, the clinic's executive director in a news release. "We are currently recruiting new volunteer physicians and hope to add an additional physician to our staff by the end of the year," she added.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | February 24, 2009
Bill would clarify students' religious rights ANNAPOLIS -- Del. John P. Donoghue has sponsored a bill that would help doctors repay their student loans by charging patients an additional fee. The legislation would require patients to be charged .001 times their bill -- or $1 per every $1,000. That money would go to a fund to help doctors repay loans they have accumulated during medical school, which average about $150,000, according to the Maryland Hospital Association.
NEWS
By LEE BOWMAN / Scripps Howard News Service | December 12, 2008
In some families, it's as straightforward as a 13-year-old declaring him or herself too old to continue seeing a "baby doctor. " For others, the reality of a sexually transmitted disease or a substance abuse problem makes it apparent that a teen suddenly requires services that are, at best, awkward to obtain from a practice with coloring books and toy boxes in the waiting room. But even if parents and teen patients agree that a new doctor is needed, finding a provider who can serve as a medical bridge to adulthood can be daunting.
NEWS
November 26, 2008
"Thank you for the new Maugans Avenue. Yes, I did wonder if it would be worth the wait. It was. It took a few days for me to realize it was actually finished. It seems like the work went on forever. Someone had a vision, and it was a good one. The traffic flow is great. Again, thank you. Look forward to Eastern Boulevard being just as nice. " - Hagerstown "I know Bush isn't really responsible for gas prices going down. I was making a point that it was ridiculous to blame him for the price going up. Also, during the Bush administration, I believe we did have one of the biggest housing market booms.
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | July 12, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - The Walnut Street Community Health Center has undergone some major transitions this year, and the facility's staff invited the community to see the changes for themselves Wednesday. The center provides care for people who participate in federal Medicare and Medicaid programs or who have no insurance, as well as those who have private insurance. To accommodate its expanding dental practice, the center has added two dental examining rooms. And rather than having separate waiting rooms for its dental and family medical care divisions, the center has created a new shared reception area.
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | March 26, 2006
HAGERSTOWN It's been a year since Washington County Hospital inaugurated a program that puts doctors specializing in hospital care on staff at all hours. The "hospitalist" program had two approaches, hospital officials said. One was to provide consistent care for people who did not have a primary care physician. The other was to give primary care physicians a break - between the time they spent seeing patients in their own offices and making rounds at the hospital, "it wasn't uncommon for them to have to spend 18-hour days," said Kelsey M. Wilkes, director of integrated patient support services.
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