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NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | June 13, 1999
A group of historical preservationists are resurrecting the Washington County Historical Trust so they can buy and protect threatened historical properties. The preservationists cited the loss in recent months of the Kammerer house and a home on the Fox Deceived plantation as factors in their decision to start up the trust, which has been inactive in recent years. The trust will also probably develop an educational campaign to remind residents and community groups of the value of historical structures, said Yvonne Hope, chairwoman of the Washington County's Historic Advisory Committee.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | May 27, 2008
To learn more about Preservation Maryland, go to www.preservationmaryland.org . HAGERSTOWN - More than 400 preservationists are expected to exchange information and ideas Thursday and Friday during the annual Preservation and Revitalization Conference in Hagerstown. The event will be hosted by Preservation Maryland, the state's oldest historic preservation organization. Liz Buxton, director of development and communications for Preservation Maryland, said Hagerstown was chosen as the site of this year's conference in part because of the city's commitment to restoring its historic past.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | November 17, 2009
MERCERSBURG, Pa. -- Proponents of preserving an 18th-century house along Pa. 16 in Mercersburg plan to meet with the building's owner Thursday to talk about options for the stone structure. MMP&W Fire Co. owns the Smith House next to its firehouse. The department's board of directors will meet with residents who are pushing to save the house rather than see it demolished. Last week, the preservationists met with representatives of Preservation Pennsylvania to learn more about how to submit an application to the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 26, 2011
Proponents of a visitors area for the Battle of Monterey Pass are continuing to solicit donations but plan to re-evaluate their efforts in April. So far, $10,216 has been privately contributed toward buying 0.8 of an acre near Rolando Woods Lions Club Park. Preservationists are seeking to raise $41,900 to provide matching funds required to receive a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. "Right now, with the economy the way it is, with it sinking, I think that's a big reason we're not reaching our goal," said John Miller, a preservationist and historian.
NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | February 5, 1999
Two Washington County Commissioners who met with Citicorp Credit Services officials on Friday said preservationists who want to save a historic farmhouse must demonstrate that they have the necessary financial resources. County Administrator Rodney M. Shoop and Commissioners Bert L. Iseminger Jr. and John L. Schnebly met with Citicorp officials to discuss the possibility of saving the Kammerer house, a 1700s farmhouse that sits on a half-acre lot in the Airport Business Park. It is surrounded by parking lots and buildings.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Correspondent | June 18, 2006
SHARPSBURG - About 70 historical preservationists from across Maryland gathered Saturday at the Washington County Rural Heritage Museum to talk about their common interests - preserving history, buildings and an earlier way of life. The museum, at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center on Sharpsburg Pike, houses more than 2,500 artifacts depicting early Washington County life, said Leslie Hendrickson, museum administrator. The museum is building a replica of a 19th-century village with cabins, a church, blacksmith shop, physician's office and a sawmill, most of which will be built by next spring.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | February 10, 1999
Washington County officials have asked preservationists to submit a plan by Friday showing how they would pay to save a historical farmhouse. County Commissioner Bert L. Iseminger and County Administrator Rodney Shoop met with Lee Stine and other preservationists Wednesday as part of a last-ditch effort to save the Kammerer house. The farmhouse is on a half-acre lot in the Airport Business Park. It is surrounded by parking lots and buildings. Citicorp Credit Services wants to buy the property but members of the Washington County Historical Society and the Middleburg/Mason-Dixon Line Area Historical Society do not want the house to be destroyed.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | February 12, 1999
Preservationists have submitted to Washington County their plan to turn the Kammerer house into a museum. Washington County Commissioner Bert L. Iseminger had asked the preservationists to submit a plan showing how they would use the historic home if they could gain ownership of the property. The preservationists also were asked to show they can afford to restore the house to pristine condition and maintain it. The house, built by Johan Ludwig Kammerer in 1774, is one of the oldest buildings in the county.
NEWS
By SCOTT BUTKI | February 23, 1999
If Citicorp Credit Services accepts a proposal by the Washington County Commissioners, the Kammerer house soon will be owned by the county and leased to a historical group for $1, County Administrator Rodney Shoop said Tuesday. If the plan succeeds, the house built by Johan Ludwig Kammerer in 1774 would not be moved or demolished. The County Commissioners agreed to the idea during a closed session Tuesday, Shoop said. Under the proposal, the county would make certain guarantees to Citicorp and would take on liability on behalf of the Mason-Dixon Middleburg/Mason-Dixon Line Area Historical Society.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 7, 2011
The Smith House received a “stay of execution” Monday, according to the Fayetteville, Pa., doctor who will purchase pieces of the 275-year-old house to reconstruct it. “We want to try to turn it into a museum. ... It’ll be a gift to America,” Paul Orange said. Demolition was scheduled to begin Monday morning for the Smith House, which proponents of preservation say played a key role in the “Black Boys Rebellion of 1765.” They believe the actions of Justice William Smith were crucial to the start of the American Revolution and the Second Amendment right to bear arms.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 18, 2011
Fundraising efforts to secure a mountaintop site associated with the Civil War Battle of Monterey Pass received a major boost last week when a Washington Township, Pa., resident offered a $30,000 donation. Battlefield preservationists and the Washington Township Supervisors are looking to spend about $100,000 for eight-tenths of an acre near Rolando Woods Lions Club Park. The site's master plan includes an interpretive center, monuments and opportunities for educational programs. “It's so exciting.
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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | March 10, 2011
An 18th-century stone house on Downsville Pike near Halfway has been named to Preservation Maryland's 2011 "Endangered Maryland" list of 11 threatened historic properties throughout the state. The 1780 home, known as "David's Friendship," is one of only 12 remaining stone homes built in Washington County prior to that date, according to the listing. "The site was part of Allegheny Power's 400-acre technology park for more than 20 years," Preservation Maryland's list said. "Since being sold in 2005, the effects of deterioration and neglect have taken their toll.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 26, 2011
Proponents of a visitors area for the Battle of Monterey Pass are continuing to solicit donations but plan to re-evaluate their efforts in April. So far, $10,216 has been privately contributed toward buying 0.8 of an acre near Rolando Woods Lions Club Park. Preservationists are seeking to raise $41,900 to provide matching funds required to receive a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. "Right now, with the economy the way it is, with it sinking, I think that's a big reason we're not reaching our goal," said John Miller, a preservationist and historian.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | February 7, 2011
The Smith House received a “stay of execution” Monday, according to the Fayetteville, Pa., doctor who will purchase pieces of the 275-year-old house to reconstruct it. “We want to try to turn it into a museum. ... It’ll be a gift to America,” Paul Orange said. Demolition was scheduled to begin Monday morning for the Smith House, which proponents of preservation say played a key role in the “Black Boys Rebellion of 1765.” They believe the actions of Justice William Smith were crucial to the start of the American Revolution and the Second Amendment right to bear arms.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | December 15, 2009
MERCERSBURG, Pa. -- MMP&W Fire Co. has given its chief permission to apply for permits to demolish an 18th century stone house on Pa. 16 in Mercersburg. Amid negotiations with preservationists trying to save the house, the fire department board of directors voted this month to move forward with obtaining demolition permits. The fire department purchased the so-called Smith House adjacent to its property after it sat on the housing market for a year. Upon learning of the ownership transfer, several residents contacted MMP&W, urging it to not demolish the house.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | November 17, 2009
MERCERSBURG, Pa. -- Proponents of preserving an 18th-century house along Pa. 16 in Mercersburg plan to meet with the building's owner Thursday to talk about options for the stone structure. MMP&W Fire Co. owns the Smith House next to its firehouse. The department's board of directors will meet with residents who are pushing to save the house rather than see it demolished. Last week, the preservationists met with representatives of Preservation Pennsylvania to learn more about how to submit an application to the National Register of Historic Places.
NEWS
By BOB MAGINNIS | May 28, 2008
Local residents will get some fresh ideas on historic preservation strategies this week, when Preservation Maryland brings its annual Preservation and Revitalization Conference to Hagerstown. On Thursday and Friday, more than 400 preservationists will meet downtown to talk about what works and what doesn't. Historic preservation in Washington County certainly includes more than Hagerstown, but since much of the downtown area is in an historic district, it's crucial that the municipality succeeds there.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | May 27, 2008
To learn more about Preservation Maryland, go to www.preservationmaryland.org . HAGERSTOWN - More than 400 preservationists are expected to exchange information and ideas Thursday and Friday during the annual Preservation and Revitalization Conference in Hagerstown. The event will be hosted by Preservation Maryland, the state's oldest historic preservation organization. Liz Buxton, director of development and communications for Preservation Maryland, said Hagerstown was chosen as the site of this year's conference in part because of the city's commitment to restoring its historic past.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Correspondent | June 18, 2006
SHARPSBURG - About 70 historical preservationists from across Maryland gathered Saturday at the Washington County Rural Heritage Museum to talk about their common interests - preserving history, buildings and an earlier way of life. The museum, at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center on Sharpsburg Pike, houses more than 2,500 artifacts depicting early Washington County life, said Leslie Hendrickson, museum administrator. The museum is building a replica of a 19th-century village with cabins, a church, blacksmith shop, physician's office and a sawmill, most of which will be built by next spring.
NEWS
by Debi TurpinIn | June 22, 2003
In Washington County today, more than 14 percent of the population can be directly tied to the building industry. This percentage does not include those individuals who sell materials to the building industry. If those numbers were added, the percentage would be much higher. Just as other county residents, these individuals live, work, pay taxes and support the businesses of this county. These individuals are just like other county residents, except for the fact that they have chosen to work in an industry that is continually being asked to "pay its fair share.
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