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Poverty

NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | December 26, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com With 32 percent of its students considered poor, Washington County Public Schools has offered training sessions for its teachers, counselors and aides in its poorest schools to help them understand how poverty affects children. Using "A Framework for Understanding Poverty" by Ruby K. Payne, a 31-year education veteran with an expertise in cultural poverty, Carol Corwell-Martin, the school system's school improvement coordinator and Title I school support specialist, and Scott Woods, principal of Clear Spring Elementary School, have talked with people working in the county's 10 Title I schools and at four other locations about the behaviors associated with poverty and how teachers can recognize them and help the students to succeed.
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NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | December 16, 2002
katec@herald-mail.com There's a framed poster on the wall in Community Action Council Executive Director David G. Jordan's office: "Stand up for what is right, even if you're standing alone. " Jordan, in the position since April 1, inherited that poster. But it remains prominent. Community Action Council was founded in 1965, part of President Lyndon B. Johnson's "War of Poverty. " "The war is still raging," Jordan says. The agency's goal has been to work itself out of a job, Jordan says.
NEWS
March 21, 2002
"Senior citizens and teens have collided twice this past year with the railroad underpass at Pangborn. The latest one on Thanksgiving Day at 9:30 p.m. Do we need a fatality before we focus attention to this dark bent road? The road is built with one 90 degree turn and then a sweeping 60 degree turn to enter the underpass. Speed and poor visibility have been a factor in both collisions to the bridge. Pole lights have been burnt out at the 60 degree curve, with no reflection devices or white lines denoting curvature of roadway.
NEWS
April 13, 2001
Sidney Poitier recounts roots in poverty, soothsayer's prophecy By DON AINES / Staff Writer SHIPPENSBURG, Pa. - The Bahamian ambassador to Japan regaled students, faculty and guests at Shippensburg University Thursday night, but had relatively little to say about his other career as an Oscar-winning actor. continued "The man that I am was being built from inside the boy that I was," Sidney Poitier said of his life growing up on Cat Island, the youngest of seven children born to tomato farmer Reginald Poitier and his wife Evelyn.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | February 15, 2000
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Despite a robust, fast-growing economy, the child poverty rate in Berkeley County, W.Va., has increased 25 percent since 1990, according to a state report issued Tuesday. cont. from front page One of the reasons may be that low-paying jobs are outpacing higher paying ones almost 3 to 1 as the county's population continues to increase. The numbers are contained in the 1999 West Virginia Kids Count report, an ongoing effort to collect data about the health, economic, educational and social well-being of children in the state.
NEWS
By BRYN MICKLE | June 16, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - West Virginia is giving an extra $50 to students who might be unable to afford clothing for school. The state has increased the school clothing allowance to $150 for students born between Sept. 1, 1980, and Aug. 31, 1994, and whose family income is at or below the federal poverty level, according to the state Department of Health and Human Resources. One of only two state-funded school clothing voucher programs in the country, the West Virginia program gives students money to buy items like pants, shirts, dresses and sewing materials.
NEWS
By BRYN MICKLE | April 1, 1999
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A new study shows that despite rising child poverty rates in Berkeley County, the Eastern Panhandle is still below the state average for West Virginia. West Virginia KIDS COUNT, a nonprofit group based in Charleston, W.Va., found the child poverty rate in Berkeley County increased 8.6 percent between 1980 and 1996, with 20.2 percent of the county's children growing up in poverty compared to a 30 percent average statewide and 20.8 percent nationally. Jefferson and Morgan counties, however, showed decreases in the child poverty rates since 1980.
NEWS
March 31, 1999
A Baltimore-based foundation on Tuesday released a study showing that West Virginia has more children living in poverty than every state but Louisiana and Mississippi, and that the percentage of youngsters below the poverty line has grown by 15 percent in the past five years. The study concludes that the state still needs new industry to offset job losses in coal-mining areas, but suggests that the group most in need may be the working poor who've recently moved off the welfare rolls.
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | March 1, 1999
The number of people living in poverty throughout the Tri-State area decreased between 1993 and 1995, even though population increased in each of the seven counties. [cont. from front page ] There were 49,306 Tri-State residents below the poverty line in 1995, compared to 52,515 in 1993, according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau estimates. The overall percentage of people in poverty dropped from 9.6 to 8.8 during that same period. Beyond the statistics is a changing picture of poverty.
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