Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsPotato Chips
IN THE NEWS

Potato Chips

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 20, 2007
Perhaps, the best way to eat a potato is after it's been thinly sliced, fried in boiling lard and drizzled in salt. At least that's the belief among organizers of Spud Fest, the yearly ode-to-potato festival at the Washington County Rural Heritage Museum north of Sharpsburg. "They're better than the store-bought ones," said event organizer Velma Poffenberger. Modern-day potato chip methods skip the lard in favor of oil, such as canola, and swap the kettle for a deep fryer, said Poffenberger, who prefers the old-fashioned way of making chips.
NEWS
May 8, 2007
The annual old-fashioned potato-planting event was held April 28 on the grounds of the Washington County Agricultural Education Center. The event, sponsored by Friends of the Rural Heritage Museum, was coordinated by museum member Bill Poffenberger. Linda and Max Reed of Downsville supplied a Belgian draft horse, 10-year-old Sally, to plow the furrows and cover the seed potatoes. The Feed Bin supplied the potatoes. Wm. Gower & Son supplied fertilizer. Harvest time for the potatoes will be during Spudfest on Saturday, Aug. 25. The spuds will be made, on the spot, into potato chips to be sampled by those who attend.
NEWS
May 6, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or julieg@herald-mail.com. Include a daytime phone number. Also include how many servings the recipe makes. We'll check supermarket prices and determine the cost per serving. When we determine the cost of ingredients, we'll assume cooks don't have any of the ingredients already on hand.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | August 17, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com Once approximately 25 bushels of potatoes were harvested Saturday from the patch at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center during Spud Fest, volunteers took over potato duty to produce homemade potato chips. Some 4-H members helped pick and clean potatoes to earn student service learning credits. Robert Jackson, 15, of Williamsport, and Amanda Lee, 13, of Sharpsburg, used their fingers to scrub dirt off potatoes in a large tub of cloudy water before plopping them into a tub of water for rinsing.
NEWS
June 14, 2003
EASTLAKE, Ohio - Grand slams are to Matt Knox what potato chips are to most others - he couldn't have just one. Knox gave Lake County a 4-0 lead with a grand slam in the fourth inning, and finished the scoring with another slam in the sixth as the Captains stayed perfect against the Hagerstown Suns with a 12-3 victory Friday evening. Knox's eight RBI fell two short of the South Atlantic League record of 10 in a game. Lake County (46-21) improved to 5-0 against Hagerstown (34-30)
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | August 28, 2005
tammyb@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY One potato, two potato, three potato - more! Potatoes were everywhere Saturday during the third annual Spudfest at the Washington County Agricultural Educational Center on Sharpsburg Pike. Potatoes were being harvested. They were being sliced and deep-fried for chips. And they were being used by children to stamp designs on paper bags. "We wanted to do something for the kids," said Frank Artz, president of the Friends of the Rural Heritage Museum at the ag center.
NEWS
September 26, 2000
Healthful fruit by KEVIN CLAPP / staff writer see also: What about apples, plums and grapes? Find your thrill on Blueberry Hill. Go bananas. Go to strawberry fields. Hey, you can even put the lime in the coconut and drink them both up if you want, as long as you get fruity at least five times a day. continued Fruits and vegetables form the cornerstone of every diet, regardless of your age and activity level. While any fruit is good for you, there are some super fruits packed fuller with the necessary vitamins and minerals you need.
NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | June 6, 2003
We've had a few soggy picnics over the past couple of weeks, but we've tried to make the most of each one. At least we haven't had to spend much on sunscreen and insect repellent. (I think even the bugs are too wet to bother.) Snacks that I don't normally keep around the house - brownies, candy, potato chips - have been making their way into my grocery cart as we attend one end-of-year party after another. Perhaps my children are involved in too many activities ... but that's a topic for another column.
NEWS
By AUTUMN PAPAJOHN | June 26, 2008
Orlando-based rock group Social Ghost is certainly social but anything but invisible after touring with Alice in Chains in 2007, performing in the Warped Tour 2006 and winning a $25,000 Grammy Showcase contest in Florida. The band will be traveling to the Tri-State area to perform at the Carroll Creek Amphitheater in Frederick, Md., to raise money for the American Cancer Society on Saturday, June 28. Social Ghost will be playing at the amphitheater as part of the Frederick Adult Co-Ed Kickball Association.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | May 13, 2009
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say I can handle the government sticking its nose into automobiles, banks, hedge funds, mortgages, real estate, credit cards and hospitals. But Cheerios? Somewhere along the line, government has lost its way. The complaint is over a Cheerios advertisement purporting that if you eat the breakfast cereal, within 10 minutes you will have the cholesterol level of a whitetail deer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | August 25, 2010
SHARPSBURG -- Preparations for the eighth annual Spud Fest are under way, giving us cause to revisit our favorite fried finger foods -- french fries and potato chips. An homage to historic agriculture, Spud Fest is a free event held at the Rural Heritage Museum south of Hagerstown. A horse-drawn plow will harvest spuds planted on the museum grounds. Volunteers then will fry up chips and serve them to attendees. This year's Spud Fest is Saturday, Aug. 28. Making your own potato chips isn't much different from making your own fries.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | May 13, 2009
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say I can handle the government sticking its nose into automobiles, banks, hedge funds, mortgages, real estate, credit cards and hospitals. But Cheerios? Somewhere along the line, government has lost its way. The complaint is over a Cheerios advertisement purporting that if you eat the breakfast cereal, within 10 minutes you will have the cholesterol level of a whitetail deer.
NEWS
May 6, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or julieg@herald-mail.com. Include a daytime phone number. Also include how many servings the recipe makes. We'll check supermarket prices and determine the cost per serving. When we determine the cost of ingredients, we'll assume cooks don't have any of the ingredients already on hand.
NEWS
By AUTUMN PAPAJOHN | June 26, 2008
Orlando-based rock group Social Ghost is certainly social but anything but invisible after touring with Alice in Chains in 2007, performing in the Warped Tour 2006 and winning a $25,000 Grammy Showcase contest in Florida. The band will be traveling to the Tri-State area to perform at the Carroll Creek Amphitheater in Frederick, Md., to raise money for the American Cancer Society on Saturday, June 28. Social Ghost will be playing at the amphitheater as part of the Frederick Adult Co-Ed Kickball Association.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | August 26, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - The image seemed frozen in time - a man working the fields behind a team of horses and a plow. Moving slowly under a hot summer sun, they kicked up clouds of dust - and potatoes - as they circled the land. There was no sputtering and chugging from a tractor, only the soft sounds of hoofbeats against freshly turned soil. It was horse-powered farming - a method consigned to the past. But Saturday, it found new life at the fifth annual Spud Fest at the Rural Heritage Museum at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center south of Hagerstown.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | August 25, 2007
The image seemed frozen in time - a man working the fields behind a team of horses and a plow. Moving slowly under a hot summer sun, they kicked up clouds of dust - and potatoes - as they circled the land. There was no sputtering and chugging from a tractor, only the soft sounds of hoofbeats against freshly turned soil. It was horse-powered farming - a method consigned to the past. But Saturday, it found new life at the fifth annual Spud Fest at the Rural Heritage Museum at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | June 20, 2007
Perhaps, the best way to eat a potato is after it's been thinly sliced, fried in boiling lard and drizzled in salt. At least that's the belief among organizers of Spud Fest, the yearly ode-to-potato festival at the Washington County Rural Heritage Museum north of Sharpsburg. "They're better than the store-bought ones," said event organizer Velma Poffenberger. Modern-day potato chip methods skip the lard in favor of oil, such as canola, and swap the kettle for a deep fryer, said Poffenberger, who prefers the old-fashioned way of making chips.
NEWS
May 8, 2007
The annual old-fashioned potato-planting event was held April 28 on the grounds of the Washington County Agricultural Education Center. The event, sponsored by Friends of the Rural Heritage Museum, was coordinated by museum member Bill Poffenberger. Linda and Max Reed of Downsville supplied a Belgian draft horse, 10-year-old Sally, to plow the furrows and cover the seed potatoes. The Feed Bin supplied the potatoes. Wm. Gower & Son supplied fertilizer. Harvest time for the potatoes will be during Spudfest on Saturday, Aug. 25. The spuds will be made, on the spot, into potato chips to be sampled by those who attend.
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | August 28, 2005
tammyb@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY One potato, two potato, three potato - more! Potatoes were everywhere Saturday during the third annual Spudfest at the Washington County Agricultural Educational Center on Sharpsburg Pike. Potatoes were being harvested. They were being sliced and deep-fried for chips. And they were being used by children to stamp designs on paper bags. "We wanted to do something for the kids," said Frank Artz, president of the Friends of the Rural Heritage Museum at the ag center.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | August 17, 2003
julieg@herald-mail.com Once approximately 25 bushels of potatoes were harvested Saturday from the patch at the Washington County Agricultural Education Center during Spud Fest, volunteers took over potato duty to produce homemade potato chips. Some 4-H members helped pick and clean potatoes to earn student service learning credits. Robert Jackson, 15, of Williamsport, and Amanda Lee, 13, of Sharpsburg, used their fingers to scrub dirt off potatoes in a large tub of cloudy water before plopping them into a tub of water for rinsing.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|