Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsPostal Service
IN THE NEWS

Postal Service

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
By LARRY WELLBORN | March 23, 2013
The Postal Service has been in the news a lot lately, and for good reason. The Postal Service has lost billions of dollars while losing market share to electronic forms of communication. But this is not entirely the fault of the Post Office or the Internet. In 2006, Congress passed the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA), a bill that was supposed to help the Post Office compete with private delivery services and be more responsive to public needs.  Unfortunately, many provisions in the bill have been the source of the problems the Postal Service is now facing.
NEWS
September 30, 2010
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The independent panel that oversees the U.S. Postal Service voted Thursday to deny the agency's request to increase the cost of mailing a letter by 2 cents -- and keeping the price of a first-class stamp at 44 cents. Ruth Goldway, chairman of the Postal Regulatory Commission, suggested at a news conference that the problem with the proposal was more in the packaging than the plea. In July, the Postal Service proposed raising first-class postage from 44 cents to 46 cents as part of a strategy for dealing with a worsening financial crisis.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | December 5, 2011
The weeks since Frederick, Md.'s mail-processing operations were transferred to Baltimore have been challenging for the Postal Service, but only because of the heavy volume of holiday-season mail, Postal Service spokeswoman Freda Sauter said Monday. "With the busy mailing season upon us there may be some days when some of our customers may be getting their mail a little later in the day and that's only due to the heavy mailing season," Sauter wrote in an email. Since Nov. 19, mail that previously would have been processed in Frederick - including mail to ZIP codes beginning with 217 - has been processed at the Baltimore Processing and Distribution Center.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | May 6, 2011
A study of the U.S. Postal Service Processing and Distribution Facility in Frederick, Md., has found that consolidating its operations with a Baltimore plant could save the agency more than $4 million a year. But area postal workers are concerned that if the move takes place, service to the 217 zip code — which includes Washington County — will suffer. "All of this handling of the mail most assuredly will result in sacrificed service for our customers," the employees of the Frederick Post Office wrote in a letter to The Herald-Mail.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | August 29, 2008
HAGERSTOWN -- Mildred St. John said she nearly burst with joy on Monday when the U.S. Postal Service returned the blue mailbox that it previously had removed from near the intersection of East Avenue and North Mulberry Street. The Postal Service recently had removed that postal box, which is a few yards from St. John's apartment, along with 12 others in the city to reduce fuel costs associated with mail collection, USPS spokeswoman Yvette Singh said last week. St. John, 81, said the Postal Service's decision to remove the mailbox made it difficult to send letters because she and her neighbors, who also are senior citizens and find it hard to get around, couldn't walk to the nearest mailbox a few blocks away.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | March 24, 2013
More than 100 people attended a rally Sunday afternoon in downtown Hagerstown that a local branch of the National Association of Letter Carriers held to advocate maintaining six-day delivery of mail. In February, the postal service announced plans to cut mail delivery to Monday through Friday, but to keep delivering packages on Saturdays. The cut is expected to save about $2 billion a year, according to a news release from the postal service. Current and retired postal workers, as well as family and friends, showed up in front of the post office on West Franklin Street to garner support for keeping six-day mail delivery.
NEWS
April 3, 2010
The question posted Wednesday on The Herald-Mail's Web site was: Should the U.S. Postal Service discontinue Saturday delivery to homes and businesses? "The U.S. Postal Service has to stop Saturday delivery to cut costs because it is incredibly inefficient, just like every government entity. Not only do they not earn a profit, but they are subsidized by us, the taxpayer. ... The postal service is the poster child for why government shouldn't run anything in our lives. " "No delivery of mail on Saturday wouldn't bother me a bit. Perhaps no mail delivery on Saturday, but keeping the post office open for a half-day would help.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | March 11, 2012
“Just say 'No delay'” and “Banks got bailed out. We got sold out” were some of the chants heard Sunday as more than 50 people attended a rally in front of the former Frederick Mail Processing and Distribution Facility to launch a campaign to reopen the mail-sorting facility. “Incredible, even many postal service employees hesitate to depend, to depend on the postal service to deliver their important, time-sensitive personal mail,” organizer Rich Shelley told the crowd.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 13, 2012
The U.S. Postal Service has amended its latest cost-savings plan, proposing to limit the hours of rural post offices instead of closing them. The change, announced last week, apparently would keep open four Tri-State-area post office branches that were considered last year for closure. Two are in Washington County - Big Pool and Brownsville. The other two - Crystal Spring and Wells Tannery - are in Fulton County, Pa. Under the new plan, the Crystal Spring and Wells Tannery post offices would be open four hours a day instead of eight, according to a list of affected branches.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | March 22, 2013
At a time when the U.S. Postal Service is recommending cutting Saturday service, it is actually adding outlets for customers in the form of village post offices such as the one at May's Service Center at 8708 Sharpsburg Pike, where a grand opening ceremony was held Friday. May's Service Center is the 200th village post office to open since the USPS introduced the idea in 2011. “As our financial situation at the Postal Service has changed, it has become more and more important for us to find ways to be relevant in the communities we serve, and not just have our own brick-and-mortar solution,” said David Fields, the vice president of the service's Capitol Metro Area.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OBITUARIES
August 8, 2013
William H. Sayles, 90, of Dayton, Ohio, formerly of Hagerstown, died on Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013, at the Hillspring Nursing Home. Born in Hagerstown, he was the son of the late William H. and Ruth Margaret (Tetlow) Sayles. He was a veteran of World War II, serving in the U.S. Army Air Corps. William was a retired employee of the U. S. Postal Service. He was a member of St. Mary Catholic Church; Morris Frock  Post 42 American Legion; Antietam Fire Co; Order of the Eagles; Order of the Moose; and the Knights of Columbus.
Advertisement
NEWS
By HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | July 29, 2013
The findings of a city survey aimed at determining the current business climate of downtown Hagerstown will be released by the end of August, according to the official who spearheaded the project. Downtown Manager Andrew Sargent said more than 300 downtown business owners and those with an interest in the area, including organizations such as the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau and the Hagerstown-Washington County Chamber of Commerce, received the eight-page questionnaire by email or the postal service in late April.  By July 24, 70 responses had been submitted, Sargent said.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | March 24, 2013
More than 100 people attended a rally Sunday afternoon in downtown Hagerstown that a local branch of the National Association of Letter Carriers held to advocate maintaining six-day delivery of mail. In February, the postal service announced plans to cut mail delivery to Monday through Friday, but to keep delivering packages on Saturdays. The cut is expected to save about $2 billion a year, according to a news release from the postal service. Current and retired postal workers, as well as family and friends, showed up in front of the post office on West Franklin Street to garner support for keeping six-day mail delivery.
OPINION
By LARRY WELLBORN | March 23, 2013
The Postal Service has been in the news a lot lately, and for good reason. The Postal Service has lost billions of dollars while losing market share to electronic forms of communication. But this is not entirely the fault of the Post Office or the Internet. In 2006, Congress passed the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA), a bill that was supposed to help the Post Office compete with private delivery services and be more responsive to public needs.  Unfortunately, many provisions in the bill have been the source of the problems the Postal Service is now facing.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | March 22, 2013
At a time when the U.S. Postal Service is recommending cutting Saturday service, it is actually adding outlets for customers in the form of village post offices such as the one at May's Service Center at 8708 Sharpsburg Pike, where a grand opening ceremony was held Friday. May's Service Center is the 200th village post office to open since the USPS introduced the idea in 2011. “As our financial situation at the Postal Service has changed, it has become more and more important for us to find ways to be relevant in the communities we serve, and not just have our own brick-and-mortar solution,” said David Fields, the vice president of the service's Capitol Metro Area.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | December 15, 2012
Gary Breakall personified the best of small-town living. His devotion to family, church, community and work made a difference in the lives of many. Born and raised in Hancock, Gary was the third of six children. His parents, Oscar and Jesse Breakall, owned a flour mill in town, and that later became a feed mill and small grocery store. Shirley Hawbaker and Gary, who played basketball and soccer, were in the same class in high school and started dating during their sophomore year.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | October 1, 2012
The U.S. Postal Service defaulted on its second multibillion dollar payment Monday, raising concern among some area residents about the future of the post offices they routinely visit. “I'd be really upset if they close the Funkstown Post Office down,” said Funkstown resident John Chirgott, 67. “I get medication through the post office, along with my mail.” Chirgott, like many residents in towns across the county, uses his town's post office to receive his mail because many smaller towns, such as Funkstown, do not have home mail-delivery service.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | July 28, 2012
Mary Ellen Younkins has operated the Brownsville Post Office out of the first floor of her Boteler Road home since 1979. That will change on Tuesday. U.S. Postal Service officials recently announced that they plan to reduce the village's postmaster position to two hours per day and discontinue the government benefits that go with it. Younkins said that left her with no other choice. “It was my decision to leave,” the 60-year-old Younkins said. “I'm just fortunate that I'm old enough and have enough years to retire.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | May 13, 2012
The U.S. Postal Service has amended its latest cost-savings plan, proposing to limit the hours of rural post offices instead of closing them. The change, announced last week, apparently would keep open four Tri-State-area post office branches that were considered last year for closure. Two are in Washington County - Big Pool and Brownsville. The other two - Crystal Spring and Wells Tannery - are in Fulton County, Pa. Under the new plan, the Crystal Spring and Wells Tannery post offices would be open four hours a day instead of eight, according to a list of affected branches.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | heather.keels@herald-mail.com | April 13, 2012
With the Tuesday deadline to file federal and state tax returns approaching, U.S. Postal Serviceofficials advise those who plan to file by mail to check their post-offices' hours because most branches will not have extended hours. Among post offices in the Baltimore district - those with zip codes beginning with 210 through 219 - only the Baltimore Main Post Office at 900 E. Fayette St. will have extended hours on Tuesday, spokeswoman Yvette Singh said. That office will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., with a final collection from the box at that address at midnight, she said.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|