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Population Growth

NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | November 21, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com Washington County needs more money for roads, emergency services and utilities to handle its population growth, state lawmakers were told Thursday. One by one, representatives from government and community groups told the Washington County Delegation to the Maryland General Assembly about their mounting needs, citing population growth as a major factor. It seems that growth, which has been long-heralded but little seen in the county, is finally making its way west of South Mountain, said Del. Christopher B. Shank, R-Washington.
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NEWS
January 29, 2004
Population not a problem To the editor: Contrary to the fear of population growth expressed by Ruth Davis in her letter in the Jan. 23 issue, it is really the time to worry about the lack of population growth. The figures from the United Nations show that we are in for a population implosion starting in the next 50 or so years. The so-called major first world nations, except for the U.S., are already going their merry way to extinction. Some may end up as new Muslim nations if they do not restrict immigration.
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | September 26, 1999
The number of students in Washington County's public schools is expected to decrease by nearly 700 in the next nine years, according to local and state estimates. Enrollment, 19,625 last year, is projected to be 18,934 in September 2008, according to the Washington County Board of Education. The county's child population may have crested, according to Director of Facilities Management Dennis McGee. [cont. from front page ] "It appears we're flat," he said last week.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | November 3, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - Republican John Yoder held a commanding lead in the race for a 16th District state Senate seat in Tuesday's general election. With 20 of 29 precincts reporting in Jefferson County, Yoder had 6,981 votes compared to Lance's 6,001 votes, according to incomplete, unofficial results. With 50 of 59 precincts reporting in Berkeley County, Yoder had 13,609 votes to Lance's 8,931. As of presstime, the unofficial totals for the two counties were 20,590 for Yoder and 14,932 for Lance.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | November 3, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - With a 7,578 vote margin, Republican John Yoder won a successful bid to return to the state Senate when he defeated Democrat Greg Lance in Tuesday's general election, according to complete, unofficial returns. With all precincts in Jefferson and Berkeley counties reporting, Yoder came away from the race with 27,899 votes compared to Lance's 20,321 votes, according to results. Yoder collected 17,899 votes in Berkeley County and 10,000 votes in Jefferson County and Lance had 11,195 votes in Berkeley County and 9,126 votes in Jefferson County, according to results.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | November 6, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Del. John Doyle pulled out a victory over Republican David Ebbitt Tuesday night, according to incomplete, unofficial election returns. With all 29 precincts reporting, Doyle had received 2,667 votes compared to Ebbitt's 2,308 votes in the race for the 57th District Delegate seat. Doyle and Ebbitt traded leads throughout the night Tuesday before Doyle began pulling away in the end. A win for Doyle would mean he will serve another two years in the Legislature representing Shepherdstown, Kearneysville, Bakerton, Harpers Ferry and Bolivar.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | April 1, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Phil Maggio, a former Morgan County Commissioner who gained a reputation for being committed to the future of Morgan County, died Monday at Winchester (Va.) Medical Center. He was 50. Maggio, who served a six-year term on the Morgan County Commission, was outspoken about the future needs of Morgan County, especially in light of expected population growth in the county. Maggio said he thought it was important for the county to have a strong, high-technology infrastructure in place.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | June 9, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- Chambersburg borough officials are looking into a proposal that might help the environment and save them more than $9 million. The borough council this week agreed to spend $15,000 on a study that will detail how nutrients can be removed from cow or swine manure. That study will be submitted to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to find out whether a participating farm's efforts can earn "credits" for protecting the Chesapeake Bay. Council President William McLaughlin hopes the amount of those credits will be enough to keep the borough from having to expand its Hollywell Avenue sewage treatment plant as planned.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | May 8, 2005
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - More than a year after Jefferson County officials implemented school impact fees, none of the money has been transferred from the City of Ranson (W.Va.) for new homes built in the city, county officials said Wednesday. The Jefferson County Commission and Ranson City Council members have been working on an agreement to collect impact fees in Ranson, but have not been able to finalize a plan, according to the commission.
NEWS
January 8, 2001
Berkeley County will hire assistant prosecutor By BOB PARTLOW / Staff Writer, Martinsburg MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Noting "growth is just eating us alive," Berkeley County Prosecuting Attorney Pamela Games-Neely last week persuaded the Berkeley County Commission to give her a sixth full-time assistant prosecutor. Last year, about 6,800 cases went through Berkeley County Magistrate Court, and those cases had to be handled by two assistant prosecutors, she said.
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