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NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | August 6, 2002
It may not have been exactly the result the Hagerstown Suns were shooting for, but you have to admire the fact that they inadvertently discovered a way to get politicians to shut up: Charge them by the word. Those wacky Hagerstown Suns - home to the failed Osama bin Laden bobblehead doll promotion and the faked story that a former U.S. president would attend a game - announced a "meet the candidates night," in which they planned to charge would-be officeholders up to $800 for a package that would include a campaign stand on the concourse and a brief speech before the, and I use this word loosely, crowd.
NEWS
By TIM ROWLAND | June 17, 2009
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say At one time or another, I think most all of us have wanted to see, in print, the words "serial killers" and "politicians" used in the same sentence. Our day has come. Writing in the Baltimore Examiner, Jim Kouri -- a vice president of the National Association of Chiefs of Police -- detailed the mental makeup of some of our more egregious criminals. Most murders involve people who know each other.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | February 14, 2006
I love class and political warfare. It's bloodless, but it kills more people in the long run. It's like the Crusades, without the mess. And we have a good one cooking in Washington County, one that pits city against county, county against state, brother against brother and Aunt Jemima against Mrs. Butterworth. The war has been brewing for some time, basically because our own smart, moneyed people are moving out of the county, while smart, moneyed people from other places are moving into the county.
NEWS
June 16, 1997
Aron episode shows need for stanardized testing for politicians Former Maryland U.S. Senatorial candidate Bill Brock must be breathing a sigh of relief. All Ruthann Aron did to him was take him to court. If police allegations are correct, this was a mild way Aron had of treating men with whom she had become disgruntled. Aron, who lost to Brock in the 1994 Republican primary, was arrested last week in Montgomery County and charged with attempting to hire a professional hit man to rub out her husband and an attorney who had brought suit against her over a soured real estate deal.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | September 21, 2004
All these years I have been so blind; I had no idea it was a simple task to change the public record of one's life with a quick phone call. It often is said, "It never hurts to ask," but who knew that not only does it "not hurt," it - well, see for yourself. The situation arose a couple of weeks ago when a regional paper let its true "liberal bias" show by printing a list of facts. To wit, the paper checked voting records and publicized the names of elected officials who it said failed to vote in past elections.
OPINION
April 26, 2013
Political courage seems to be in short supply To the editor: I keep hearing politicians say the government is too big and I keep asking, “Compared to what?” Big and small are relative terms that require a frame of reference, but all I hear are slogans, not answers. It seems to me that the government may not be too big compared to the things we, the citizens, ask it to do. So it seems that we have two options; make the government more efficient in what it does so that it requires less resources to get the job done, or ask it to stop doing something that it is now doing.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | September 7, 1999
Coming clean seems to be as admirable a quality for politicians as being clean, according to an informal survey Saturday of Tri-State area residents. The question asked residents contacted randomly was: "Should politicians be forced to answer questions about their youthful drug use and other indiscretions?" Opinions were mixed. "I think a man deserves a lot of credit for having quit it," said Evelyn Brown, referring to news stories about youthful drug experimentation.
NEWS
By DYLAN THACKSTON / Pulse Correspondent | January 15, 2008
There are a lot of questions that I hear from teens who are into politics like I am. One big complaint I hear from teens is how they feel ignored by politicians and make no difference in elections before they are 18, old enough to vote. It seems, at first, like there is really nothing we can do, because, heck, voting is the only thing that counts, right? Well, no, actually, it isn't. For ideas, I asked some teens. They had a few ideas about how teens too young to vote can make their voices heard in the up-coming elections.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 19, 2013
I love fights between unlikely participants. You come to expect fights between NASCAR drivers (however trumped up), rap musicians and anyone who comes within 20 yards of Bill O'Reilly. But these fights are boring and predictable. The real fun occurs when two unlikely combatants go at it, like two organic gardeners arguing over the proper internal temperature for compost. And there's a good one brewing between the cities of Washington and New York over the latter's controversial “stop-and-frisk” policy.
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OPINION
April 26, 2013
Political courage seems to be in short supply To the editor: I keep hearing politicians say the government is too big and I keep asking, “Compared to what?” Big and small are relative terms that require a frame of reference, but all I hear are slogans, not answers. It seems to me that the government may not be too big compared to the things we, the citizens, ask it to do. So it seems that we have two options; make the government more efficient in what it does so that it requires less resources to get the job done, or ask it to stop doing something that it is now doing.
OPINION
April 24, 2013
Mark Twain noticed that a cat that sits on a hot stove once will never sit on it again. But, he said, it won't sit on a cold stove, either. Politics is different, because in politics we discover the opposite extreme is true. Having sat on a hot stove once, a politician will sit on a hot stove again, even if he has to rebuild the fire himself. It's fascinating that Anthony Weiner and Mark Sanford just couldn't stay away. No stove was too hot, no embarrassment too embarrassing to convince them that perhaps they just aren't suited for public life as a representative of the people.
OPINION
By DAVID HANLIN | December 25, 2012
Last weekend, I had the pleasure of traveling to my youngest son's graduation.  It was a time to celebrate the sacrifices and hard work he and the other graduates had to put in to complete their college degrees. We were joined by families who traveled from all over the country to support loved ones as they received the symbol of achievement in their chosen fields of study. However, the event had a bit of a mournful quality to it. At the opening, there were words and a moment of silence for the victims in Newtown, Conn.
OPINION
By LLOYD WATERS | October 28, 2012
“My choice in life was either to be a piano player in a whorehouse or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference.” Those words were spoken by Harry S Truman back in his day. Maybe he was on to something. Our election is coming down to the wire, and your vote is important. Our future awaits us at the fork in the road. Yogi Berra's advice: “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” Even if you believe that the election will be determined by the states of Ohio, Virginia and Florida; even if you believe your vote doesn't mean anything; and even if you agree with President Truman's analogy, you still need to cast your vote.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | October 14, 2012
Former U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter, who died Sunday, could be a polarizing figure, but he spoke to the point and often elicited laughs with his quips. Specter represented Pennsylvania in the Senate for three decades. He lost a re-election bid after switching from the Republican to the Democratic party in 2009. L. Michael Ross, president of the Franklin County Area Development Corp., said Specter tried to visit each of Pennsylvania's 67 counties every year or two years. Ross described Specter as a key player in helping Letterkenny Army Depot in Chambersburg, Pa., through the Base Realignment and Closure Commission process in 2005.
OPINION
April 16, 2012
We understand the right of free expression. We, too, understand the right of political speech and the very high bar that exists when it comes to suppressing any aspect of that speech. Robocalls, in our view, clear that bar with some to spare. We do not argue with a politician's right to engage in a robocall campaign. But we believe that a resident should have the right to opt out, just as it's possible to register on a Do Not Call list to block telemarketers. It doesn't help that, as any registered voter with a land line knows by now, robocalls have become synonymous with slime.
NEWS
January 15, 2012
A former public schoolteacher has announced her intentions to run for Pennsylvania's 33rd Senate District. Susan Spicka of Shippensburg plans to run for the Senate seat that serves portions of Cumberland, Franklin, Adams and York counties. In a news release, Spicka, 41, said she has been spending time talking to residents from across the four-county district and listening to their concerns as she weighs her first run for political office. With district boundaries changing for 2012, Spicka said she feels there is an opportunity for change and now is the ideal time to run. "There are nearly half a million people in Pennsylvania unable to find work.
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