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OPINION
April 13, 2011
So in Maryland, it's going to be easier to gamble and smoke dope, but harder to drink. That's kind of a mixed message, don't you think? Not that anything the legislature does ever makes tons of sense, but this one has me a bit stumped. The Maryland General Assembly moved to tempt a casino concern into buying the lodge at Rocky Gap, while also paving the way for medical marijuana. On the other hand, it raised the tax on liquor. Although, to be fair, Del. Neil Parrott introduced an amendment that would have cut the liquor tax by half in the hope that it would, according to The Herald-Mail, "stimulate sales.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | October 21, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Washington County's two major political parties are working together to educate people about public service. The Democratic and Republican central committees are in a coalition holding a Nov. 7 session on the demands and responsibilities of public office or serving on boards and committees. A Jan. 23, 2010, follow-up session will cover the nuts and bolts of a campaign, such as election law requirements. Local and state candidates have until July to file for the 2010 elections.
NEWS
November 1, 2000
What is soft money? By DAN KULIN / Staff Writer "Soft money" is defined as unregulated contributions from unions, corporations or individuals to political parties. Campaign finance laws prohibit unions and corporations from giving campaign contributions to candidates. The laws also limit the amount individuals can contribute to campaigns to $1,000 per campaign. Primaries and general elections are considered separate campaigns. There are, however, no limits on contributions to political parties.
NEWS
By ASHLEY HARTMAN | September 13, 2007
GREENCASTLE, Pa. - The Franklin County Republican Committee voted 6-4 Wednesday night to put Fred Young III of Greencastle on the November ballot for the Antrim Township Board of Supervisors. "He's someone who can work with the supervisors, he had broad knowledge and a lot of energy," said James Taylor, chairman of the Franklin County Republican Party. Young was sworn in Tuesday night to serve on the Antrim Township Board of Supervisors until Dec. 31 to fill the vacancy left by Robert Whitmore.
NEWS
November 3, 2008
Last week's question During this election season, especially on the national level, many citizens have expressed the feeling that the candidate they oppose is not only unsuitable, but downright evil. What accounts for this excess of ill feelings? The media whipping up frenzies on issues that really amount to nothing. - 22 votes (23 percent) The candidates themselves, who have decided that if they have to be nasty to win, then that's what they will do. - 13 votes (14 percent)
NEWS
June 29, 2009
Apathy is a threat to democracy To the editor: One of the many threats to our form of democracy is apathy. We each stand side by side, unhappy with actions taken by our elected representatives, but we do little to change their actions. It matters not what our political affiliations are - conservative, liberal or moderate. What matters is we don't surrender our precious right to influence our government's action through the representatives we've elected to serve us and represent our needs in office.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | July 16, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - As she begins her two-year term as president of the League of Women Voters of Washington County, Fanny Crawford said the revitalized organization is looking for new members, gender notwithstanding. "We have about 50 members currently," Crawford said, estimating six to 10 of them are men. "I would like to see that grow to around 75, especially among younger voters. " While some of the membership is of the experienced type, there are some new members to the game and that's good for everyone, she said.
NEWS
February 2, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer Harley and Brenda Barnett of Chambersburg, Pa., have always registered as independents. "We don't particularly like any politician. Don't trust 'em," said Harley Barnett, 40. Many others in the Tri-State area are beginning to agree. The percentage of people who don't register with either major political party is rising. It mirrors a national trend that began in 1968, said Michael Towle, assistant professor of political science at Mount Saint Mary's College near Emmitsburg, Md. In Washington County last year, 10.7 percent of registered voters were not affiliated with either major party.
NEWS
October 15, 2000
Miller House is playing politics By STACEY DANZUSO / Staff Writer Before they had buttons and bumper stickers, presidential candidates used handkerchiefs to get their names and faces under the public's nose. continued Campaigning for the 1888 election, Grover Cleveland and running mate Allen G. Thurman passed out handkerchiefs showing their profiles under the heading "Our candidates. " Benjamin Harrison and running mate Whitelaw Reid also campaigned with handkerchiefs during their failed bid for reelection in 1892.
NEWS
By DON AINES | August 30, 1999
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The health-related resignation of Franklin County Court of Common Pleas Judge William H. Kaye gives political parties just two weeks to pick nominees to appear on the Nov. 2 ballot in Franklin and Fulton counties. In a letter dated Aug. 25, the 52-year-old judge informed Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge that he is resigning effective Sept. 30. Kaye was in court hearing cases Monday morning but left at lunch time. His secretary, Kathy Barnhart, said he was not taking any questions about his resignation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By GEORGE MICHAEL | September 20, 2012
Was God “booed” at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte earlier this month?  A simple procedural process of getting a reference to God and a statement about Jerusalem and Israel in the Democratic platform turned into a public relations nightmare. It is not smart to boo God in the Bible belt. To be fair, it was hard to tell if God was the target of the audience or if delegates were just frustrated at the ineptness of the voting process. Political parties usually handle procedural and public relations strategies in the proverbial smoke-filled rooms.
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OPINION
June 17, 2012
Letter writer can have socialism, freedom from religion To the editor: Based on her recent letter (“Parrott's mailing 'disappointing to say the least,'” May 20), I believe Victoria Ross is in need of lessons in history and on Christianity. I wonder if she has read our Constitution; I suspect Del. Parrott would give her a copy. She should read the First Amendment. This is where the only clause can be found that defines our religious freedoms. She will not see “separation of church and state.” What she will see is that she does not have the right to “freedom from religion.” The two most important things we learn from Jesus are “love the Lord your God with your whole heart” and “love your neighbor as yourself.” This totally encompasses what it means to be a Christian.
OPINION
By LLOYD WATERS | September 15, 2011
As I sit back and watch the continuous rhetoric unfold between the political parties and their plans for increasing jobs in the current economic meltdown, I can't help but wonder exactly how successful either party might be. I also wonder if they have any concerns about jobs leaving America for other shores. In the last election, our political nominees touted "green jobs" as the answer for increasing employment. That solution has not materialized.     Is there any possibility that we can resolve the unemployment dilemma with current political thinking?
OPINION
April 13, 2011
So in Maryland, it's going to be easier to gamble and smoke dope, but harder to drink. That's kind of a mixed message, don't you think? Not that anything the legislature does ever makes tons of sense, but this one has me a bit stumped. The Maryland General Assembly moved to tempt a casino concern into buying the lodge at Rocky Gap, while also paving the way for medical marijuana. On the other hand, it raised the tax on liquor. Although, to be fair, Del. Neil Parrott introduced an amendment that would have cut the liquor tax by half in the hope that it would, according to The Herald-Mail, "stimulate sales.
NEWS
September 27, 2010
"Hagerstown caller, here is a fact maybe you don't know. The Imam Rauf should pay the $300K taxes he owes on the slum apartments in Hudson County, N.J. Rauf received $2 million public financing to renovate low-income apartments. For years tenants have been complaining about blocked up sewers, no heat. Now it's big Demo politicians who have covered up the fact Rauf used our money and then never fixed the slums. TV news showed the deplorable conditions and the actual tenants. He and President Obama have criticized America, but love the milk and honey.
NEWS
August 20, 2010
Washington County's two major political parties will have their annual picnics next week. The Republican Club will hold a picnic Aug. 25 at Smithsburg Community Park, off Bikle Road. Tickets cost $25 per adult, $15 for children ages 7 to 16 and are free for children younger than 7. Gates open at 5:30 p.m.; dinner is at 6 p.m. Call 301-739-2118 or send an e-mail to lizss1@myactv.net "> lizss1@myactv.net. RSVP by Aug. 20. The Democrats' picnic will be Aug. 26 at 5 p.m. at Red Men Lodge #84 pavilion, 16129 Lappans Road, Williamsport.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 12, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- At least one Eastern Panhandle lawmaker would like to hold off on a special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Robert C. Byrd, who died June 28 at the age of 92. Del. Craig Blair, R-Berkeley, said Monday he would like Gov. Joe Manchin to remain the state's chief executive for a while longer, and he proposed that the election to fill Byrd's seat be held next year to avoid claims that the proposed special election...
NEWS
By DON AINES | July 2, 2010
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- With Independence Day right around the corner, hundreds of registered voters in Washington County are receiving letters informing them they no longer can be registered as "Independent" voters. Many voters have long referred to themselves as independents and have registered to vote that way rather than as unaffiliated, but the Maryland Board of Elections last month determined that the actual Independent Party, formed in 2008 to support the presidential candidacy of Ralph Nader, no longer was qualified to appear on ballots in the state.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | October 21, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Washington County's two major political parties are working together to educate people about public service. The Democratic and Republican central committees are in a coalition holding a Nov. 7 session on the demands and responsibilities of public office or serving on boards and committees. A Jan. 23, 2010, follow-up session will cover the nuts and bolts of a campaign, such as election law requirements. Local and state candidates have until July to file for the 2010 elections.
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