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Poison Ivy

NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | November 16, 2004
trishr@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - In the laboratory behind glass, Homeopathy Works on Fairfax Street is busy making alternative medicine. Two old mortar and pestle machines are grinding up a substance that eventually will become remedies. Close by, a worker monitors a modern pill-making machine that produces 98 tablets every two to three seconds. Since 1993, Homeopathy Works proprietors Joe Lillard and Linda Sprankle-Lillard have been making alternative medicines in Berkeley Springs.
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NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | August 29, 2004
In her delightful book, "The Fragrant Path," Louise Beebe Wilder includes a wonderful chapter on "Plants of Evil Odor. " She notes that what stinks for one person may not be unpleasant for another. If I were writing a new book of herbs I would be tempted to include a chapter on "Plants of Evil Intent" - focusing on those plants that cause the gardener discomfort. Just as our personal response to odors varies, so do various plants cause us problems. We'll skip over the many dreadful things that can happen when you ingest certain garden plants and focus on touch and smell.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | August 18, 2004
Preschool policy gets first reading The Washington County Board of Education on Tuesday had its first reading of a policy governing enrollment of preschool students and the selection of sites where the students will be taught. The policy is not a change from how prekindergarten has been provided in the past but simply makes formal the rules that have been in place for many years, said Jill Burkhart, supervisor of elementary reading, social studies and early learning.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | July 8, 2004
gregs@herald-mail.com The words "on set" have a more natural meaning for a film crew working in an area owned by the Town of Boonsboro. With a small group of actors, camera operators and assistants, Director Gary Hubb, 28, walked through the plot of land off Md. 34 Wednesday, going over which sites will work for different scenes of a World War II-era drama being shot this week. One patch of grass in the woods will be the backdrop for two soldiers to have a heart-to-heart.
NEWS
By KATE COLEMAN | June 5, 1998
If the mere thought of poison ivy has you "scratchin' like a hound," read this. The best way to avoid having an allergic reaction to poison ivy is to avoid having contact with the plant. The saying, "Leaves of three, let them be," is old, but good, advice. --cont from lifestyle-- The culprit is urushiol (pronounced oo-roo-shee-ohl), a chemical in the sap of all parts of poison ivy, oak and sumac plants. Poisoning occurs from contact with the nasty stuff - usually from touching part of a bruised plant, but it is easily transferred from object to object, according to University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service information.
NEWS
July 16, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer Marge Peters knew she had a serious Japanese beetle problem, but it really hit home when she hung out her wash the other day and found them clinging to her once clean clothes. "I'm having a horrible time. It's just eating us alive," said Peters, whose home is on about 1 1/2 acres along Alt. U.S. 40 south of Funkstown. The pests have been munching on flowers in her garden and on the leaves of her white pine and Bradford pear trees, despite her husband's efforts to keep them away with traps and pesticides.
NEWS
July 16, 1997
Movie Guide Films for Friday, Saturday and Sunday (last updated for July 18-20) Movie Links: Box Office Reviews Online Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert Chicago Tribune, Flicks Picks His & Her Movie View Hollywood Online Movie Net Paramount Pictures Premiere Magazine Roger Ebert Movie Reviews Screen It! Siskel & Ebert Sony Pictures The Best Video Guide The Movie Emporium The Official Academy Awards Universal Picture Walt Disney Warner Bros.
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