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Poison Ivy

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By KATE COLEMAN | June 5, 1998
If the mere thought of poison ivy has you "scratchin' like a hound," read this. The best way to avoid having an allergic reaction to poison ivy is to avoid having contact with the plant. The saying, "Leaves of three, let them be," is old, but good, advice. --cont from lifestyle-- The culprit is urushiol (pronounced oo-roo-shee-ohl), a chemical in the sap of all parts of poison ivy, oak and sumac plants. Poisoning occurs from contact with the nasty stuff - usually from touching part of a bruised plant, but it is easily transferred from object to object, according to University of Maryland Cooperative Extension Service information.
NEWS
by JEFF RUGG/Copley News Service | June 28, 2005
Q: What is the best way to remove poison ivy from a hedge? A: Actually, it will be the same method no matter where it is growing. You will have three things you are trying to do at the same time: 1. Avoid contacting the poison ivy with your bare skin. 2. Put herbicide on the poison ivy. 3. Avoid getting herbicide on the hedge plants. I would use Roundup or a similar complete plant-killing herbicide. It only works on green material, so if you spill it, it won't soak into the soil and kill more plants.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | August 18, 2004
Preschool policy gets first reading The Washington County Board of Education on Tuesday had its first reading of a policy governing enrollment of preschool students and the selection of sites where the students will be taught. The policy is not a change from how prekindergarten has been provided in the past but simply makes formal the rules that have been in place for many years, said Jill Burkhart, supervisor of elementary reading, social studies and early learning.
NEWS
By NATALIE BRANDON / Special to The Herald-Mail | July 20, 2009
Sunburn, bee stings, poison ivy -- Oh, my! With summer in full swing, some common and irritating woes can put a damper on good times. Dr. Bhuvasa Raja, director of Urgent Care for Washington County Hospital, offers her advice on how to prevent and treat these summertime blues. Sunburn "Sunburn is the most common condition we see, as far as summer-related cases go," Raja says. "We also see many cases of poison ivy and bug bites, especially in children. " Sunburn makes skin red, dry, itchy and sensitive to sunlight and heat.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 24, 2006
A mile-long stretch of towpath at the C&O Canal National Historical Park received a much-needed manicure Thursday, thanks to 80 sixth-graders from Western Heights Middle School. The students, with the help of 14 parents and four teachers, pruned a portion of the towpath in the park's Big Slackwater area. They also removed trash and debris from the parking lots and cleaned out grills. David Tune, C&O Canal volunteer coordinator, said the middle school students have been coming to clean the towpath since 1996.
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | November 16, 2004
trishr@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - In the laboratory behind glass, Homeopathy Works on Fairfax Street is busy making alternative medicine. Two old mortar and pestle machines are grinding up a substance that eventually will become remedies. Close by, a worker monitors a modern pill-making machine that produces 98 tablets every two to three seconds. Since 1993, Homeopathy Works proprietors Joe Lillard and Linda Sprankle-Lillard have been making alternative medicines in Berkeley Springs.
NEWS
by Dorry Baird Norris | August 29, 2004
In her delightful book, "The Fragrant Path," Louise Beebe Wilder includes a wonderful chapter on "Plants of Evil Odor. " She notes that what stinks for one person may not be unpleasant for another. If I were writing a new book of herbs I would be tempted to include a chapter on "Plants of Evil Intent" - focusing on those plants that cause the gardener discomfort. Just as our personal response to odors varies, so do various plants cause us problems. We'll skip over the many dreadful things that can happen when you ingest certain garden plants and focus on touch and smell.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | April 4, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com With the weather warming up, people will be itching to go outdoors. More people will be hiking and camping, leading to a greater chance of run-ins with tiny critters and slithering snakes that could do more than just frighten both man and beast. Among the poisonous animals and plants in Washington County are the Northern copperhead, the black widow spider and poison ivy. Lori Young, horticulture extension educator with the Maryland Cooperative Extension in Washington County, said brown recluse spiders are not common in Maryland, but she knows of local people who have been diagnosed with a brown recluse spider bite.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 1, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- The Washington County Commissioners are closer to approving a revised weed control ordinance after hammering out some of the remaining questions Tuesday during a workshop session. When the commissioners first tackled the ordinance more than two months ago, discussion revolved around the broad question of where tall grasses and vegetation were, and were not, appropriate. By Tuesday's meeting, that question largely had been resolved, leaving only smaller details for discussion.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | June 20, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Cycling around Asia in late 1994 and 1995, Jennifer Carpenter-Peak and her husband often got sick from contaminated food and water. For bacterial infections, the couple took the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which helped, at least temporarily, Carpenter-Peak said. "What was happening is, you'd get knocked out for a day, then you'd feel great for a couple of weeks, and then it would come on back," said Carpenter-Peak, who lives south of Berkeley Springs.
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NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 1, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- The Washington County Commissioners are closer to approving a revised weed control ordinance after hammering out some of the remaining questions Tuesday during a workshop session. When the commissioners first tackled the ordinance more than two months ago, discussion revolved around the broad question of where tall grasses and vegetation were, and were not, appropriate. By Tuesday's meeting, that question largely had been resolved, leaving only smaller details for discussion.
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NEWS
By NATALIE BRANDON / Special to The Herald-Mail | July 20, 2009
Sunburn, bee stings, poison ivy -- Oh, my! With summer in full swing, some common and irritating woes can put a damper on good times. Dr. Bhuvasa Raja, director of Urgent Care for Washington County Hospital, offers her advice on how to prevent and treat these summertime blues. Sunburn "Sunburn is the most common condition we see, as far as summer-related cases go," Raja says. "We also see many cases of poison ivy and bug bites, especially in children. " Sunburn makes skin red, dry, itchy and sensitive to sunlight and heat.
NEWS
By LLOYD "PETE" WATERS | April 27, 2008
On a recent trip to Hopewell Road, I stopped by Jim Haddock's top soil barn and had him place a nice scoop of black dirt on my old 1981 Ford pickup. As we stood there chatting for a few minutes he told me how he enjoyed reading my articles in the paper. I was flattered, as he continued, "Do you think you could write an article on Dargan, Moonshine, Frog Hollow and fishing?" I have a lot of fond memories about fishing near Dargan, he said. "I'm not sure I'm up to the task, but I'll see what I can do," I answered.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | April 26, 2006
The Sunday forecast was for early clouds, followed by sunshine and maybe some thunderstorms late in the afternoon. A night rain followed by a warm day promised good weather for a pursuit I'd never heard of before I came to Hagerstown 30 years ago - hunting wild mushrooms. The mushrooms of choice are not the white-capped type you see at the supermarket, but morels, which resemble (to me) sea sponges on a stalk. Notoriously difficult to cultivate, they are so prized that they even have their own organized group of hunters, The National Morel Mushroom Hunters Association, which you can visit at www.morel.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | April 24, 2006
A mile-long stretch of towpath at the C&O Canal National Historical Park received a much-needed manicure Thursday, thanks to 80 sixth-graders from Western Heights Middle School. The students, with the help of 14 parents and four teachers, pruned a portion of the towpath in the park's Big Slackwater area. They also removed trash and debris from the parking lots and cleaned out grills. David Tune, C&O Canal volunteer coordinator, said the middle school students have been coming to clean the towpath since 1996.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | September 11, 2005
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail will run "A Life Remembered. " The story will take a look back - through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others - at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Iva V. Fox, who died Sept. 2 at the age of 97. Her obituary appeared in the Sept. 3 edition of The Herald-Mail. marlob@herald-mail.com Named after a family friend, Iva Bowers Fox always bristled when someone called her "Ivy.
NEWS
by JEFF RUGG/Copley News Service | June 28, 2005
Q: What is the best way to remove poison ivy from a hedge? A: Actually, it will be the same method no matter where it is growing. You will have three things you are trying to do at the same time: 1. Avoid contacting the poison ivy with your bare skin. 2. Put herbicide on the poison ivy. 3. Avoid getting herbicide on the hedge plants. I would use Roundup or a similar complete plant-killing herbicide. It only works on green material, so if you spill it, it won't soak into the soil and kill more plants.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | June 20, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Cycling around Asia in late 1994 and 1995, Jennifer Carpenter-Peak and her husband often got sick from contaminated food and water. For bacterial infections, the couple took the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which helped, at least temporarily, Carpenter-Peak said. "What was happening is, you'd get knocked out for a day, then you'd feel great for a couple of weeks, and then it would come on back," said Carpenter-Peak, who lives south of Berkeley Springs.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | April 4, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com With the weather warming up, people will be itching to go outdoors. More people will be hiking and camping, leading to a greater chance of run-ins with tiny critters and slithering snakes that could do more than just frighten both man and beast. Among the poisonous animals and plants in Washington County are the Northern copperhead, the black widow spider and poison ivy. Lori Young, horticulture extension educator with the Maryland Cooperative Extension in Washington County, said brown recluse spiders are not common in Maryland, but she knows of local people who have been diagnosed with a brown recluse spider bite.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | December 5, 2004
julieg@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - The doo-wop moves weren't limited to the stage Saturday as performers at the Holiday Hop Doo Wop concert at The Maryland Theatre encouraged audience members to dance on their feet or in their seats. Some audience members even got to strut their stuff on stage. Bob Glessner, who lives outside Chambersburg, Pa., was sitting in the audience when Traci Robinson of The Marvelettes sat in his lap before bringing him on stage and telling him to "shake what your mama gave you. " Glessner, dressed in jeans, a black shirt and a ball cap, became the character Bill as the three Marvelettes, dressed in sexy black dresses, surrounded him and sang "Don't Mess With Bill.
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