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Plastic Bottles

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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | February 16, 2009
MERCERSBURG, Pa. -- It could be described as the ultimate recycling project, taking a product that usually harms the environment and using it instead for nature's benefit. A James Buchanan High School class is collecting 2,000 plastic bottles to do just that. The students hope to build a greenhouse out of 2-liter bottles; construction is expected to begin this spring. Seth Gilbert, a senior, summed up his classmates' sentiments when he talked about what they're most looking forward to after months of collecting bottles.
NEWS
September 25, 2007
Where to go Washington County has bins available in many locations where you may drop off recyclable material. Call the county's recycling office at 240-313-2796 for times of operation. Some sites are available 24 hours. · Dargan Convenience Center 2201 Dargan School House Road · Forty West Landfill Approximately one mile west of Huyetts Crossroads off U.S. 40 at 12630 Earth Care Road · Greensburg Convenience Center 13125 Bikle Road, near Smithsburg · Hancock Convenience Center 6502 Hess Road · Kaetzel Convenience Center 2926 Kaetzel Road, off Md. 67 Drop-off sites · Boonsboro - 125 Orchard Drive · Clear Spring - Community Park · Funkstown - Behind the fire hall · Hagerstown - Shopping center at the intersection of Dual Highway and Cleveland Avenue; Giant Eagle, 835 W. Hillcrest Road; Food Lion, Eastern Boulevard; South End Shopping Center, Maryland Avenue · Keedysville - Behind Red Byrd Restaurant · Maugansville - Maugansville Ruritan Club · Smithsburg - Behind the fire hall · Sharpsburg - Behind the fire hall What to take Forty West Landfill · Bottles and jars - clear, green or brown glass · Newspapers · Phone books · Boxboard · Aluminum cans · Tin cans · Plastic bottles (Nos.
NEWS
By NAPSA | April 4, 2009
If you're like many homeowners, you may never have thought about the "green" options available right below your feet. Being a socially responsible homeowner can start from the ground up. Installing flooring alternatives such as carpet made from recycled plastic bottles, reclaimed hardwood or laminate made with pre-consumer waste can help save the environment one step at a time. All across the country, buildings and structures are being dismantled. Generally, the waste is dumped into landfills.
NEWS
September 24, 2006
Where to go Washington County has bins available in many locations where you may drop off recyclable material. Call the county's recycling office at 240-313-2796 for times of operation. Some sites are available 24 hours. · Dargan Convenience Center 2201 Dargan School House Road · Forty West Landfill Approximately one mile west of Huyetts Crossroads off U.S. 40 at 12630 Earth Care Road · Greensburg Convenience Center 13125 Bikle Road, near Smithsburg · Hancock Convenience Center 6502 Hess Road · Kaetzel Convenience Center 2926 Kaetzel Road off Md. 67 Drop-off sites · Boonsboro - 125 Orchard Drive · Clear Spring - Community Park · Funkstown - Behind the fire hall · Hagerstown - Shopping Center at the intersection of Dual Highway and Cleveland Avenue; Giant Eagle, 835 W. Hillcrest Road; Food Lion Store, Eastern Boulevard; South End Shopping Center, Maryland Avenue · Keedysville - Behind Red Byrd Restaurant · Maugansville - Maugansville Ruritan Club What to take Forty West Landfill · Bottles and jars - Clear, green or brown glass · Newspapers · Phone books · Aluminum cans · Tin cans · Plastic bottles (Nos.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
Where to go Washington County has bins available in many locations where you may drop off recyclable material. Call the county's recycling office at 240-313-2796 for times of operation. Some sites are available 24 hours. Dargan Convenience Center 2201 Dargan School Road Forty West Landfill Approximately one mile west of Huyetts Crossroads off U.S. 40 at 12630 Earth Care Road Greensburg Convenience Center Bikle Road near Smithsburg Hancock Convenience Center 6502 Hess Road Kaetzel Convenience Center 2926 Kaetzel Road off Md. 67 Drop-off sites Boonsboro - 125 Orchard Drive Clear Spring - Community Park Funkstown - Behind the fire hall Hagerstown - Ames Shopping Center, Dual Highway; Giant Eagle, 835 W. Hillcrest Road; Hagerstown Light Department, 425 E. Baltimore St.; South End Shopping Center, Maryland Avenue Keedysville - Behind Red Byrd Restaurant Maugansville - Maugansville Ruritan Club Sharpsburg - Beside Town Pond What to bring Forty West Landfill Bottles and jars - Clear, green or brown glass Newspapers Phone books Aluminum cans Tin cans Plastic bottles (Nos.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | March 12, 2004
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Work at the Washington Township Recycling Center off Pa. 16 is about to become more efficient thanks to a $292,000 grant that will, among other things, pay for a new storage building on the site. Township Manager Michael Christopher said the money will be spent to improve facilities and equipment in the township's recycling and trash transfer station. The township has to come up with about $30,000 in matching funds, he said.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | November 27, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- The long-awaited self-service Charles R. Biggs Recycling Center officially will open Monday, Dec. 15, said Bennett Lentczner, who chairs the Morgan County Solid Waste Authority. A test run will take place Dec. 13 from noon to 3 p.m., he said. Residents can bring their recyclables, including plastic, directly to the new recycling center on U.S. 522 at 2990 Valley Road, which is between Herb's Auto Sales and Eddie's Tire. It will be open Monday and Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., said Bill Pechumer, authority recycling coordinator.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | November 9, 2008
GREENCASTLE, PA. - The bottle of water sitting on Brian Denton's desk looked like a monument to health and wellness. Its white cap and rippled plastic carefully contained what appeared to be the epitome of pristine liquids. "Yeah, this looks pure, but it is not. It's full of leeching chemicals," Denton said while grabbing the bottle. "That's just part of why I created Project Earth H20. " In a proactive step toward reducing the environmental and economical footprint of plastic bottles, Denton, a native of Greencastle, began Project Earth H20 with the hope of giving convenience-minded consumers an alternative to what he called "toxic" water bottles.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | November 8, 2008
GREENCASTLE, Pa. -- The bottle of water sitting on Brian Denton's desk looked like a monument to health and wellness. Its white cap and rippled plastic carefully contained what appeared to be the epitome of pristine liquids. "Yeah, this looks pure, but it is not. It's full of leeching chemicals," Denton said while grabbing the bottle. "That's just part of why I created Project Earth H20. " In a proactive step toward reducing the environmental and economical footprint of plastic bottles, Denton, a native of Greencastle, began Project Earth H20 with the hope of giving convenience-minded consumers an alternative to what he called "toxic" water bottles.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | November 24, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. --Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority board member Edgar Mason was recognized Thursday for being named a "recycling champion" by the Recycling Coalition of West Virginia. In a presentation held Thursday at the Berkeley County Commission meeting, Solid Waste Authority Chairman Clint Hogbin saluted Mason's commitment to developing recycling programs for plastic bags, yard waste, plastic bottles and other projects in 16 years of volunteer service on the board.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 21, 2012
The criminal mind is a fascinating thing, not so much for its ingenuity, but for the fact that if it were employed in honest pursuits, there is no end to the number of world problems it could solve. Like if the guys involved in “Oceans 11” had put that much thought into cancer research, melanoma would be a thing of the past. But I would give an extra gold star to the fellow who figured out that laundry detergent could be a high-profit target for organized crime sprees.
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NEWS
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | October 6, 2011
It only takes John Lenahan about a one- to two-mile walk from his North End home to collect more recyclables than he can carry. Some days he'd venture farther from home, but he has to unload the plastic grocery bags filled with aluminum soda cans and plastic bottles. Once home, the trash he's collected goes into his recycling bins, since Hagerstown residents have curbside pickup. Lenahan's also quick to remove the lids on plastic bottles, aware that sealed up bottles get washed into storm drains and take up a lot of room because they can't be crushed.
NEWS
By NAPSA | April 4, 2009
If you're like many homeowners, you may never have thought about the "green" options available right below your feet. Being a socially responsible homeowner can start from the ground up. Installing flooring alternatives such as carpet made from recycled plastic bottles, reclaimed hardwood or laminate made with pre-consumer waste can help save the environment one step at a time. All across the country, buildings and structures are being dismantled. Generally, the waste is dumped into landfills.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | February 16, 2009
MERCERSBURG, Pa. -- It could be described as the ultimate recycling project, taking a product that usually harms the environment and using it instead for nature's benefit. A James Buchanan High School class is collecting 2,000 plastic bottles to do just that. The students hope to build a greenhouse out of 2-liter bottles; construction is expected to begin this spring. Seth Gilbert, a senior, summed up his classmates' sentiments when he talked about what they're most looking forward to after months of collecting bottles.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | November 27, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- The long-awaited self-service Charles R. Biggs Recycling Center officially will open Monday, Dec. 15, said Bennett Lentczner, who chairs the Morgan County Solid Waste Authority. A test run will take place Dec. 13 from noon to 3 p.m., he said. Residents can bring their recyclables, including plastic, directly to the new recycling center on U.S. 522 at 2990 Valley Road, which is between Herb's Auto Sales and Eddie's Tire. It will be open Monday and Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., said Bill Pechumer, authority recycling coordinator.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | November 24, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. --Berkeley County Solid Waste Authority board member Edgar Mason was recognized Thursday for being named a "recycling champion" by the Recycling Coalition of West Virginia. In a presentation held Thursday at the Berkeley County Commission meeting, Solid Waste Authority Chairman Clint Hogbin saluted Mason's commitment to developing recycling programs for plastic bags, yard waste, plastic bottles and other projects in 16 years of volunteer service on the board.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | November 9, 2008
GREENCASTLE, PA. - The bottle of water sitting on Brian Denton's desk looked like a monument to health and wellness. Its white cap and rippled plastic carefully contained what appeared to be the epitome of pristine liquids. "Yeah, this looks pure, but it is not. It's full of leeching chemicals," Denton said while grabbing the bottle. "That's just part of why I created Project Earth H20. " In a proactive step toward reducing the environmental and economical footprint of plastic bottles, Denton, a native of Greencastle, began Project Earth H20 with the hope of giving convenience-minded consumers an alternative to what he called "toxic" water bottles.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | November 8, 2008
GREENCASTLE, Pa. -- The bottle of water sitting on Brian Denton's desk looked like a monument to health and wellness. Its white cap and rippled plastic carefully contained what appeared to be the epitome of pristine liquids. "Yeah, this looks pure, but it is not. It's full of leeching chemicals," Denton said while grabbing the bottle. "That's just part of why I created Project Earth H20. " In a proactive step toward reducing the environmental and economical footprint of plastic bottles, Denton, a native of Greencastle, began Project Earth H20 with the hope of giving convenience-minded consumers an alternative to what he called "toxic" water bottles.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | June 2, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - A plastic bottle maker plans a multimillion-dollar expansion that will increase the size of its Hagerstown operation by about 50 percent, but employment is expected to stay about the same, a company official said Wednesday. The expansion will give Parker Plastics Inc. "more room to grow," Plant Manager Jim Brown said. It "will give us additional space for our present business, as well as additional business we foresee in the future. " The company now leases 40,000 square feet of a 100,000-square-foot building at 105 Enterprise Lane, off Western Maryland Parkway along the city's western fringe.
NEWS
September 25, 2007
Where to go Washington County has bins available in many locations where you may drop off recyclable material. Call the county's recycling office at 240-313-2796 for times of operation. Some sites are available 24 hours. · Dargan Convenience Center 2201 Dargan School House Road · Forty West Landfill Approximately one mile west of Huyetts Crossroads off U.S. 40 at 12630 Earth Care Road · Greensburg Convenience Center 13125 Bikle Road, near Smithsburg · Hancock Convenience Center 6502 Hess Road · Kaetzel Convenience Center 2926 Kaetzel Road, off Md. 67 Drop-off sites · Boonsboro - 125 Orchard Drive · Clear Spring - Community Park · Funkstown - Behind the fire hall · Hagerstown - Shopping center at the intersection of Dual Highway and Cleveland Avenue; Giant Eagle, 835 W. Hillcrest Road; Food Lion, Eastern Boulevard; South End Shopping Center, Maryland Avenue · Keedysville - Behind Red Byrd Restaurant · Maugansville - Maugansville Ruritan Club · Smithsburg - Behind the fire hall · Sharpsburg - Behind the fire hall What to take Forty West Landfill · Bottles and jars - clear, green or brown glass · Newspapers · Phone books · Boxboard · Aluminum cans · Tin cans · Plastic bottles (Nos.
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