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By CLYDE FORD | June 18, 1998
by JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer enlargement CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Italian-born engineer Renzo Riddo waves his hands as he points out the brick work being done on a building at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. "You feel like you're trying to save this for generation after generation," Riddo says. Riddo, 53, has done restoration work around the world to preserve historical structures for future generations. His work has taken him to the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican in Rome and to the pyramids in Egypt.
NEWS
June 18, 2004
Ed Hazlett, head teacher at Fairview Outdoor Education Center in Clear Spring, gave the following suggestions for fun and educational nature-related summer activities: -- Sprouting wild seeds The kids will need seeds, baggies, glass or plastic drinking glass, paper towels, water. Collect wild seeds - such as dandelions' puffy white seeds - from yards and fields. Dry the seeds out by placing them on a paper towel and laying them in the sun away from wind. Put a paper towel inside a glass so that it is up against the side of the glass; put the seeds between the towel and the glass.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 20, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Plastic from corn, lip balm from soybeans and glue from milk were some of the science of agriculture that students at Hooverville Elementary School learned this week while visiting the Mobile Ag Ed Science Center. Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, the center is one of four mobile labs that brings agricultural science to schools, said retired teacher Carol Henicle, who was giving a Friday morning tour to a class of third-graders. "They want them to learn about farming because it's the number one industry in Pennsylvania," Henicle said before the students began two experiments on "The Mighty Smooth Bean," the soybean, second only to corn in the number of acres planted in Franklin County.
NEWS
September 16, 2008
Today, many folks are generations removed from the farm and in addition to their loss of connection they make very little effort to learn anything about agriculture. Upon a recent visit to Mt. Vernon, I was reminded there was a time in this nation's history that agrarian pursuits were not looked down upon. Many people today think if you cannot do it with a computer then it is not worth doing. While I enjoy much of the benefits that computers afford us I still prefer potato chips over computer chips when it comes to eating.
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 7, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A decision could come within the week on whether to repair or replace the ceiling of The Capitol Theatre, but the reopening of the 78-year-old theater is still months away, said Paul Cullinane, president of Downtown Chambersburg Inc. The theater at 159 S. Main St. has been closed since April -- when a section of the ceiling measuring about 4 feet by 10 feet fell during a performance by...
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 16, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The auditorium ceiling of the Capitol Theatre, part of which collapsed during an April performance, will be replaced as part of a project costing $315,000, according to an announcement Wednesday by Paul Cullinane, president of Downtown Chambersburg Inc. "The final decision of the Downtown Chambersburg Inc. Board of Directors is to replace the main auditorium ceiling with a new ceiling of...
NEWS
by DON AINES | September 9, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Work to replace the Capitol Theatre ceiling is entering its final weeks, but no new shows will be scheduled for the historic theater until January, according to Downtown Chambersburg Inc. President Paul Cullinane. The 78-year-old theater has been closed since April 30 when a section of the ceiling measuring about 4 feet by 8 feet collapsed during a performance, injuring several people, one of whom was hospitalized for about three weeks with leg injuries.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | July 2, 2005
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. waynesboro@herald-mail.com Big band leader Larry Elgart & His Orchestra are scheduled to perform in a July 23 concert that is being "brought to you by the Capitol Theatre Center," according to a poster on the front door of the theater at 159 S. Main St. Elgart and his band, nicknamed "The Ambassadors of Swing," will play in the Chambersburg Area Senior High School auditorium instead because the interior of...
NEWS
August 23, 2006
Week of Aug. 20, 1956 Pride swelled in the breasts of around 500 Williamsporters Thursday night as they listened to their two school bands, the senior high school band of 37 members and their cadet band of 27 members. Realizing that the two bands are only 5 years old, under the direction of H.C. Kight, the audience was somewhat amazed at the remarkably fine program that the bands rendered. We bet that dial telephones, which will be placed in service here next December, are older than you think.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
MERCERSBURG, Pa. - A local historian and archaeologist began investigating Flannery's Restaurant on the Square last spring for clues about the building's past. On behalf of the Franklin County (Pa.) Underground Railroad Coalition, Tim Rockwell went into the building's attic to look at old political slogans painted on the plaster stairwell walls. A press release distributed Tuesday morning said Rockwell was amazed by the age of what he found as well as the possible connections they establish to those who might have used the tavern as a station on the underground railroad nearly 170 years ago. "It is clear that in over a 10-year period some one person or a group went to great lengths to record support for their political party and later, given the other symbols, likely turned that into action by engaging in the secretive and dangerous underground railroad," Rockwell said in the release.
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NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | March 27, 2009
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. -- A Thursday night fire that damaged the rear of Plasterers Florist in Chambersburg is believed to have been intentionally set, a Pennsylvania State Police fire marshal said. Fire Marshal Jeff Sarver said he is investigating the exact cause of the fire, but said he is certain the blaze was intentionally set. "The only thing that could have initiated this fire was a human hand," Sarver said. The fire at 990 Lincoln Way East was reported Thursday about 8 p.m., officials said.
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NEWS
By DON AINES | February 20, 2009
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Plastic from corn, lip balm from soybeans and glue from milk were some of the science of agriculture that students at Hooverville Elementary School learned this week while visiting the Mobile Ag Ed Science Center. Sponsored by the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, the center is one of four mobile labs that brings agricultural science to schools, said retired teacher Carol Henicle, who was giving a Friday morning tour to a class of third-graders. "They want them to learn about farming because it's the number one industry in Pennsylvania," Henicle said before the students began two experiments on "The Mighty Smooth Bean," the soybean, second only to corn in the number of acres planted in Franklin County.
NEWS
October 22, 2008
MERCERSBURG, Pa. - A local historian and archaeologist began investigating Flannery's Restaurant on the Square last spring for clues about the building's past. On behalf of the Franklin County (Pa.) Underground Railroad Coalition, Tim Rockwell went into the building's attic to look at old political slogans painted on the plaster stairwell walls. A press release distributed Tuesday morning said Rockwell was amazed by the age of what he found as well as the possible connections they establish to those who might have used the tavern as a station on the underground railroad nearly 170 years ago. "It is clear that in over a 10-year period some one person or a group went to great lengths to record support for their political party and later, given the other symbols, likely turned that into action by engaging in the secretive and dangerous underground railroad," Rockwell said in the release.
NEWS
September 16, 2008
Today, many folks are generations removed from the farm and in addition to their loss of connection they make very little effort to learn anything about agriculture. Upon a recent visit to Mt. Vernon, I was reminded there was a time in this nation's history that agrarian pursuits were not looked down upon. Many people today think if you cannot do it with a computer then it is not worth doing. While I enjoy much of the benefits that computers afford us I still prefer potato chips over computer chips when it comes to eating.
NEWS
August 23, 2006
Week of Aug. 20, 1956 Pride swelled in the breasts of around 500 Williamsporters Thursday night as they listened to their two school bands, the senior high school band of 37 members and their cadet band of 27 members. Realizing that the two bands are only 5 years old, under the direction of H.C. Kight, the audience was somewhat amazed at the remarkably fine program that the bands rendered. We bet that dial telephones, which will be placed in service here next December, are older than you think.
NEWS
by DON AINES | September 9, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Work to replace the Capitol Theatre ceiling is entering its final weeks, but no new shows will be scheduled for the historic theater until January, according to Downtown Chambersburg Inc. President Paul Cullinane. The 78-year-old theater has been closed since April 30 when a section of the ceiling measuring about 4 feet by 8 feet collapsed during a performance, injuring several people, one of whom was hospitalized for about three weeks with leg injuries.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | July 2, 2005
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. waynesboro@herald-mail.com Big band leader Larry Elgart & His Orchestra are scheduled to perform in a July 23 concert that is being "brought to you by the Capitol Theatre Center," according to a poster on the front door of the theater at 159 S. Main St. Elgart and his band, nicknamed "The Ambassadors of Swing," will play in the Chambersburg Area Senior High School auditorium instead because the interior of...
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 16, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The auditorium ceiling of the Capitol Theatre, part of which collapsed during an April performance, will be replaced as part of a project costing $315,000, according to an announcement Wednesday by Paul Cullinane, president of Downtown Chambersburg Inc. "The final decision of the Downtown Chambersburg Inc. Board of Directors is to replace the main auditorium ceiling with a new ceiling of...
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 7, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A decision could come within the week on whether to repair or replace the ceiling of The Capitol Theatre, but the reopening of the 78-year-old theater is still months away, said Paul Cullinane, president of Downtown Chambersburg Inc. The theater at 159 S. Main St. has been closed since April -- when a section of the ceiling measuring about 4 feet by 10 feet fell during a performance by...
NEWS
June 18, 2004
Ed Hazlett, head teacher at Fairview Outdoor Education Center in Clear Spring, gave the following suggestions for fun and educational nature-related summer activities: -- Sprouting wild seeds The kids will need seeds, baggies, glass or plastic drinking glass, paper towels, water. Collect wild seeds - such as dandelions' puffy white seeds - from yards and fields. Dry the seeds out by placing them on a paper towel and laying them in the sun away from wind. Put a paper towel inside a glass so that it is up against the side of the glass; put the seeds between the towel and the glass.
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