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Perfect Score

NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | January 28, 2007
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. Trevor Ford and academic success have been synonymous since the Jefferson High School senior was a boy. When Ford was in first grade in central New York, he was in a gifted program. He again was enrolled in a gifted program at Shepherdstown Elementary School after his family moved to Jefferson County, said his mother, Susan Ford. This year at Jefferson High School, Ford's schedule is loaded with advanced placement and honors courses, and he is vice president of the school's student government organization, the National Honor Society and the school's thespian troupe, according to his mother and school officials.
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NEWS
by DON AINES | September 11, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - SAT scores for Chambersburg Area Senior High School students fell in 2006 compared to 2005, but the district is starting a test preparation program that could lead to higher scores for those taking the exam during this school year. Critical reading scores, until last year known as the verbal portion of the SAT, fell from 512 in 2005 to 506 this year, according to Janet Martin, chairwoman of the high school's counseling department. In math, the scores fell from 511 to 501. In a new third category, writing, students scored 493, Martin said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | February 25, 2006
HAGERSTOWN andrews@herald-mail.com Oliver's Pub Restaurant in Longmeadow Shopping Center was shut down for five days because of health-code violations, but reopened after the problems were fixed, the Washington County Health Department said Friday. A reported based on a Feb. 17 inspection listed 14 violations, many of them concerning cleanliness. One violation was listed as major: rodent droppings observed on a 5-pound bag of graham cracker crumbs. The bag, which appeared to be chewed open, was discarded, the report says.
NEWS
by DON AINES | March 15, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com ST. THOMAS, Pa. - From a distance of 20 yards, Kyle Gottfried squinted through the peep sight of his Browning Micro Midas 3 compound bow and drew a bead on a 40-centimeter target about the size of a large pizza. The arrow failed to find the bull's-eye on his 52nd shot of the day, but the center 10-point ring of the paper target, a little bigger than a silver dollar, had been perforated several times already. "I'm going for 525 today," Gottfried said during a break at the St. Thomas Sportsmen's Association.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | February 24, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - Who initiated the practice of antiseptic surgery in 1865? How many weeks are in an Olympiad? Calvin Broadus is the original name of what popular rapper? After a few rounds of such questions Sunday afternoon, John DeRonda and his friends were feeling a bit befuddled. DeRonda and his friends called themselves the Brain Freeze. "And it hasn't thawed out yet," DeRonda said. "It's definitely taxing whatever memories I had from school," said team member Krista Steiding of Charles Town, W.Va.
NEWS
January 6, 1999
By DON AINES / Staff Writer, Chambersburg photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer MERCERSBURG, Pa. - After scoring well above 1400 on the SAT in his junior year, Gregory Rohman didn't need to take the test again. [cont. from front page ] The Mercersburg Academy student took the test a second time early in his senior year and scored 1540, but even that didn't satisfy him. The third time was the charm. He scored a perfect 1600 when he took the test again in November.
NEWS
July 10, 1998
FREDERICK, Md. - Frederick County Public School student Christine M. Liu, 15, earned a perfect score of 1600 on the Scholastic Aptitude Test she took this spring. Since her kindergarten year at Yellow Springs Elementary School, Liu's teachers have nurtured her math and writing skills. After kindergarten, she was urged to attend the magnet program for gifted and talented students at North Frederick Elementary School. During Liu's sixth-grade year at North Frederick, she was introduced to Governor Thomas Johnson Middle School teacher Nick Diaz.
NEWS
January 23, 1998
To Maryland Gov. Parris Glendening, for his commitment of $13.5 million to upgrade the Interstate 81 intercharge at Halfway Boulevard. The economic benefits will be tremendous. To Rosemary Burtner, who taught for 45 years in the Washington County schools, touching the lives of countless local youngsters with her caring nature and her exuberant attitude toward life and all that can be learned. To James Michael Borum, a 25-year-old Hagerstown man who stole more than $20,000 in jewelry from his own grandmother.
NEWS
January 19, 1998
Pa. student aces SAT By LISA GRAYBEAL Staff Writer, Chambersburg CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - In between milking his family's cows and feeding them, Philip Mummert opened a piece of mail that could change his life. At first glance, Mummert, 18, believed it was a mistake. The Chambersburg Area Senior High School senior could hardly believe he was looking at a perfect score on the computer-printed results of his Scholastic Aptitude Test, better known as the SAT. "I saw the two 800s sitting there and thought, 'wow,'" Mummert said.
NEWS
March 30, 1997
By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., is the most conservative congressman in the Tri-State delegation and U.S. Rep. Bud Shuster, R-Pa., is not far behind, according to scorecards kept by 10 prominent lobbying groups. The only Democrat in the bunch, U.S. Rep. Bob Wise, D-W.Va., not surprisingly scored better with liberal groups. The ratings reflect how the congressmen voted on the key issues of five conservative and five liberal organizations in 1996.
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