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NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | July 17, 2010
Dear Lynne: Is there something special one can do with new garlic -- the type with the skin that's not papery yet and with the long green stalks? I like the idea of it being around for a short time; you feel like you've got to get to it fast. What can I do to cash in? -- Steven from Lancaster Dear Steven: I am with you about moving fast. The whole summer's like that. So many tastes, so many foods that seem like they'll be gone tomorrow -- or at least not be in such great shape tomorrow -- and you've got to feast right now. We just had a mess of different kinds of peas with edible pods that were like that.
NEWS
February 11, 2007
1/2 cup water 1 1/2 cup chopped purple cabbage 1/4 cup peas (frozen peas are OK 1/4 teaspoon cumin, optional Virgin olive oil for dressing Cook cabbage in water until it just begins to wilt. Add peas and cumin, if desired, and cook until peas are tender. Optional: Top with virgin olive oil for dressing, as you would with salad dressing. Serves 2. - Courtesy of Simone Heurich
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 27, 2006
For Audrey Ross, eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day won't be enough to ensure good luck for 2007. "We always sprinkle a few black-eyed peas in the bottoms of our purses," said Ross, who lives in Martinsburg, W.Va. "You carry them around all year for good luck. Just two or three peas, uncooked. " Many cultures have their good luck food rituals for New Year's - whether it's black-eyed peas, a tradition with Southern roots, or eating a heaping dish of pork and sauerkraut, a tradition popular among many Pennsylvanians.
NEWS
September 7, 2007
Sept. 12 - Sept. 18 The Washington County Commission on Aging offers noon lunches to anyone 60 years and older at seven locations - Hancock, Smithsburg, Keedysville, Williamsport and three in Hagerstown. A two-day reservation notice is required and a donation is asked per meal. For information, call 301-790-0275. Weekly Menu Wednesday - Open-faced turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, mixed vegetables, fruit cocktail, whole grain bread and milk.
NEWS
November 22, 2006
1 pound package frozen vegetables for stew 1 cup frozen peas 2 cups cooked turkey, cut into 1/2-inch cubes 12-ounce jar non-fat turkey gravy 1 tablespoon dried parsley 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1 teaspoon dried rosemary, crushed 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 refrigerated pie crust, room temperature Cook frozen vegetables and peas according to package directons. Drain any cooking liquid from stew vegetables and peas. Add turkey cubes, gravy, herbs, salt and pepper to vegetables in oven-safe 2-quart cooking dish.
NEWS
July 7, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or
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BUSINESS
October 7, 2012
Name of business: Sweet Pea Dessert Owners: Corry Eagler and Arelis Torres Address: 10 W. Baltimore St., Greencastle, Pa. Opened: Oct. 7, 2011 Products and services: Baked goods, including cupcakes, brownies and cookies, as well as cake pops, chocolate candies, custom-order cakes and Pennsylvania State University Creamery ice cream. Cupcake bar open on Fridays and Saturdays, where patrons can customize cupcakes with a variety of fillings, frostings and toppings.
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OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | September 29, 2012
Pauline Reedy was known for her meticulous organization and high standards, which she expected of herself, her family and those around her. “She was a great mother. She tried to get them to follow her principles - do your best, be truthful. She did a darn good job,” said husband William “Bill” Reedy of Hagerstown. “She expected us to do our best. B's were not acceptable because we could get A's,” said Cynthia “Cindy” Serbin of Knoxville, Tenn. “We all have our master's, so we must have listened,” said daughter Deborah “Debbie” Carpenter of Ellicott City, Md. Pauline was a firm disciplinarian and believed in dealing immediately with issues, a skill that served her well as a substitute teacher at North Hagerstown High School, a job she took once son Jeff Reedy was in high school.
NEWS
By LYNNE ROSSETTO KASPER / Scripps Howard News Service | July 17, 2010
Dear Lynne: Is there something special one can do with new garlic -- the type with the skin that's not papery yet and with the long green stalks? I like the idea of it being around for a short time; you feel like you've got to get to it fast. What can I do to cash in? -- Steven from Lancaster Dear Steven: I am with you about moving fast. The whole summer's like that. So many tastes, so many foods that seem like they'll be gone tomorrow -- or at least not be in such great shape tomorrow -- and you've got to feast right now. We just had a mess of different kinds of peas with edible pods that were like that.
NEWS
July 7, 2009
The Herald-Mail would like to publish penny-pinching, tasty recipes by thrifty cooks in the Tri-State area on the Food page every week. Contact staff writer Julie Greene at 301-733-5131 or 800-626-6397, ext. 2320, or
NEWS
By Scripps Howard News Service | February 7, 2009
This is one of those dishes that tastes even better reheated, so if possible make it a day ahead (adding the apple and butter just before serving). Soup holds three to four days in the refrigerator and freezes well. Cook to Cook: Split peas' cooking time can range from 30 minutes to an hour depending on their age. If you buy them where there is fast turnover the soup should cook up quickly. NORTH COUNTRY WINTER PEA SOUP WITH FRESH APPLE Expeller pressed Canola oil or good tasting extra-virgin olive oil 1 large carrot, peeled and fine chopped 3 medium onions, peeled and chopped into 1/4-inch dice 2 small to medium turnips, peeled and cut into a fine dice Salt and fresh-ground black pepper 2 teaspoons ground allspice, or more to taste 1 1/2 tablespoons dried basil 4 whole cloves 1 teaspoon dried thyme 1/2 small cabbage, cut into a 1/4-inch dice 1 large smoked ham hock (1 1/2 pounds)
NEWS
June 22, 2008
By OMNI VORE FREDERICK, Md. -- On a hot and humid afternoon, my companion and I enjoyed the Indian buffet lunch at Bombay Grill in downtown Frederick. Entering the cool restaurant, I was greeted and seated at the window. The tablecloth was white butcher paper. A bottle of Italian mineral water decorated the table. The dècor consisted of two carved Indian statues, a painting of an Indian procession, and a framed mandala, a circular design, composed of peacock feathers and tiny mirrors.
NEWS
September 7, 2007
Sept. 12 - Sept. 18 The Washington County Commission on Aging offers noon lunches to anyone 60 years and older at seven locations - Hancock, Smithsburg, Keedysville, Williamsport and three in Hagerstown. A two-day reservation notice is required and a donation is asked per meal. For information, call 301-790-0275. Weekly Menu Wednesday - Open-faced turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, mixed vegetables, fruit cocktail, whole grain bread and milk.
NEWS
February 11, 2007
1/2 cup water 1 1/2 cup chopped purple cabbage 1/4 cup peas (frozen peas are OK 1/4 teaspoon cumin, optional Virgin olive oil for dressing Cook cabbage in water until it just begins to wilt. Add peas and cumin, if desired, and cook until peas are tender. Optional: Top with virgin olive oil for dressing, as you would with salad dressing. Serves 2. - Courtesy of Simone Heurich
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 27, 2006
For Audrey Ross, eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day won't be enough to ensure good luck for 2007. "We always sprinkle a few black-eyed peas in the bottoms of our purses," said Ross, who lives in Martinsburg, W.Va. "You carry them around all year for good luck. Just two or three peas, uncooked. " Many cultures have their good luck food rituals for New Year's - whether it's black-eyed peas, a tradition with Southern roots, or eating a heaping dish of pork and sauerkraut, a tradition popular among many Pennsylvanians.
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