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OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | December 5, 2012
Now that the election and Thanksgiving are past, perhaps it would be useful but not necessarily fun to reflect a bit on partisanship, the institution that has done much to put us where we are. The Founders, by and large, envisioned the United States as a kind of nonpartisan assembly of a country. Most of the “framers” hated the idea of party, associating it with the interminable conflicts of European public life, endless corruption and subversion of the public purpose. Franklin and Washington and many of their colleagues detested partisanship (although bowing to emerging realties Washington did become a marginal Federalist)
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | November 11, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - When Washington County sought the state's help with major building projects in the last eight years, there were only a handful of local people who could call or visit the governor and ask him to put money in the budget. It mostly came down to party politics. Gov. Parris Glendening is a Democrat and most of the county's elected officials are Republicans. Last week's election changed that important dynamic. In January, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will become the first Republican in more than 30 years to hold the purse strings as Maryland's governor.
NEWS
December 3, 2006
Editor's note: Each week, The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on its Web site, www.herald-mail.com . Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. Each Sunday, a sampling of edited reader comments will run in The Herald-Mail. Last week's poll question was: Should the Dec. 12 interviews of applicants for an open seat on the Hagerstown City Council be conducted in open session? The session should be open so that the public can see how the council conducts business, not what goes on behind closed doors.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | May 11, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Resurgence was the theme as Washington County Democrats gathered Thursday evening for their annual Jefferson-Jackson Dinner, and while they're outnumbered here, they invoked both national and state victories in last year's election to rally the troops for next year. Candidates who lost closely fought races in November encouraged local Democrats to close the gap next year. Andrew Duck, who lost his bid to unseat U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., covered a table in the corridor of the Four Points Sheraton with campaign material for next time.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | April 27, 2003
Anytime a public official in Washington County suggests anything even remotely progressive, I get suspicious. It's just not their way, normally. So what's going on when majorities on both the Board of County Commissioners and the Legislative Delegation wish to engage in something so revolutionary as one-county government? The delegation's endorsement is especially curious, since the only time they've gotten aggressive over anything in recent years involved cases of party politics.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | November 7, 2002
tarar@herald-mail.com The two Democratic Washington County Commissioners ousted from office in Tuesday's general election said Wednesday there was one major reason why they weren't re-elected: The Republicans did a better job of promoting their candidates. "They did a better job than our Democratic Central Committee with getting the word out," Commissioners Vice President Paul L. Swartz said. Swartz and Commissioner Bert L. Iseminger were defeated in their bids to serve another four-year term, according to complete but unofficial results.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | March 22, 2005
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - She's worked at farming, raised four children and now she's a politician. But it was not planned that way. Jefferson County Commission member Jane Tabb told a group of Shepherd University students Monday that public office never entered her mind until an unusual occurrence at the family farm in 1991. Tabb's husband, Cam Tabb, was raising hay in a field the couple owned next to the former Jefferson County Landfill along Leetown Pike when he noticed that vegetation was not growing in one section of the lot. The discovery started a long controversy over pollution problems at the landfill.
NEWS
By TERRY TALBERT | July 7, 1998
Former Republican Bert Iseminger Jr. is running for Washington County Commissioner as an Independent candidate. "This is a race about issues, not party politics," the former Republican said. "In all my years on the planning commission, none of my decisions had anything to do with politics. I look at both sides of an issue fairly and with an open mind. And I listen to what the public has to say. " Iseminger, 49, has been on the Washington County Planning Commission for more than a decade and currently chairs the panel.
NEWS
By DONALD R. CURRIER | March 1, 2008
On the 200th anniversary of the ratification of the U.S. Constitution an illustrated book of the Constitution was printed. Famous author James Michener wrote a foreword. Here is a partial quote: "Fifty-five typical American citizens met and argued for 127 days during a ferociously hot Philadelphia summer and produced one of the magisterial documents of world history. Almost without being aware of their great achievement, they fashioned a nearly perfect instrument of government. " These men wrote into the Constitution their high- minded hopes and dreams for a new kind of government of the people, by the people and for the people.
NEWS
October 31, 2006
Why do some Maryland House of Delegates seats attract two solid, well-qualified candidates, while districts with weak incumbents - who could use a good challenge - often go begging? Hard to tell, but it always seems to work out that way. For better than 15 years, Del. John Donoghue (D) has been a decent representative in Annapolis. About the same time as Donoghue was first voted in, former Del. Paul Muldowney (then D, now R) was voted out, mostly for his unpopular but necessary rewrite of state pension law. Now the two square off in delegate district 2-C, which consists largely of the City of Hagerstown.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
By SPENCE PERRY | December 5, 2012
Now that the election and Thanksgiving are past, perhaps it would be useful but not necessarily fun to reflect a bit on partisanship, the institution that has done much to put us where we are. The Founders, by and large, envisioned the United States as a kind of nonpartisan assembly of a country. Most of the “framers” hated the idea of party, associating it with the interminable conflicts of European public life, endless corruption and subversion of the public purpose. Franklin and Washington and many of their colleagues detested partisanship (although bowing to emerging realties Washington did become a marginal Federalist)
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OPINION
By ART CALLAHAM | September 30, 2012
I have tried to remain politically nonpartisan in these columns. As most of you know I'm a registered Republican and consider myself to be a conservative, although, I have many friends who are Democrats and liberal in their ideological bent. In this column I want to write about a different type of partisanship that is not orientated on a particular political party. More on ideology; this partisanship I simply label as “geographic partisanship.” In this column I'm going to be partisan about where you and I live.
NEWS
April 15, 2010
"I was interested in the A1 Monday paper headline, 'Program lauded for hike in construction.' I would be interested in having the houses that were built monitored to see how long it takes to have them sold. " - Hagerstown "My comment is: Justice Stevens has just recently announced his retirement from the Supreme Court. President Obama has yet to select a nominee to forward to the Senate for confirmation, and the Republicans are already threatening a filibuster.
NEWS
By DONALD R. CURRIER | March 1, 2008
On the 200th anniversary of the ratification of the U.S. Constitution an illustrated book of the Constitution was printed. Famous author James Michener wrote a foreword. Here is a partial quote: "Fifty-five typical American citizens met and argued for 127 days during a ferociously hot Philadelphia summer and produced one of the magisterial documents of world history. Almost without being aware of their great achievement, they fashioned a nearly perfect instrument of government. " These men wrote into the Constitution their high- minded hopes and dreams for a new kind of government of the people, by the people and for the people.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | May 11, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - Resurgence was the theme as Washington County Democrats gathered Thursday evening for their annual Jefferson-Jackson Dinner, and while they're outnumbered here, they invoked both national and state victories in last year's election to rally the troops for next year. Candidates who lost closely fought races in November encouraged local Democrats to close the gap next year. Andrew Duck, who lost his bid to unseat U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., covered a table in the corridor of the Four Points Sheraton with campaign material for next time.
NEWS
December 3, 2006
Editor's note: Each week, The Herald-Mail invites readers to answer poll questions on its Web site, www.herald-mail.com . Readers also may submit comments about the poll question when voting. Each Sunday, a sampling of edited reader comments will run in The Herald-Mail. Last week's poll question was: Should the Dec. 12 interviews of applicants for an open seat on the Hagerstown City Council be conducted in open session? The session should be open so that the public can see how the council conducts business, not what goes on behind closed doors.
NEWS
October 31, 2006
Why do some Maryland House of Delegates seats attract two solid, well-qualified candidates, while districts with weak incumbents - who could use a good challenge - often go begging? Hard to tell, but it always seems to work out that way. For better than 15 years, Del. John Donoghue (D) has been a decent representative in Annapolis. About the same time as Donoghue was first voted in, former Del. Paul Muldowney (then D, now R) was voted out, mostly for his unpopular but necessary rewrite of state pension law. Now the two square off in delegate district 2-C, which consists largely of the City of Hagerstown.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | March 22, 2005
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - She's worked at farming, raised four children and now she's a politician. But it was not planned that way. Jefferson County Commission member Jane Tabb told a group of Shepherd University students Monday that public office never entered her mind until an unusual occurrence at the family farm in 1991. Tabb's husband, Cam Tabb, was raising hay in a field the couple owned next to the former Jefferson County Landfill along Leetown Pike when he noticed that vegetation was not growing in one section of the lot. The discovery started a long controversy over pollution problems at the landfill.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | April 27, 2003
Anytime a public official in Washington County suggests anything even remotely progressive, I get suspicious. It's just not their way, normally. So what's going on when majorities on both the Board of County Commissioners and the Legislative Delegation wish to engage in something so revolutionary as one-county government? The delegation's endorsement is especially curious, since the only time they've gotten aggressive over anything in recent years involved cases of party politics.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | November 11, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - When Washington County sought the state's help with major building projects in the last eight years, there were only a handful of local people who could call or visit the governor and ask him to put money in the budget. It mostly came down to party politics. Gov. Parris Glendening is a Democrat and most of the county's elected officials are Republicans. Last week's election changed that important dynamic. In January, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. will become the first Republican in more than 30 years to hold the purse strings as Maryland's governor.
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