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Parris Glendening

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NEWS
January 20, 1999
The Williamsport High School band performed Wednesday at Gov. Parris Glendening's inauguration in Annapolis. The inaugural showing caps a year of hard work and noteworthy performances, said Band Director Ray Chaney. The Blue Band, which performed the "Proud Heritage March," was the only Washington County high school band at the Annapolis event, he said. Chaney said he and the band's members were excited by the invitation. "They're finally starting to see that the hard work leads to a reputation that leads to events like this," he said.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) -- A study concludes that Maryland's smart-growth law isn't doing much to curb suburban sprawl. The study by University of Maryland scholars said the 12-year-old law is ineffective because it can't force builders to comply. The study also said Maryland hasn't given developers enough incentive to launch projects in older, urban neighborhoods. Former Gov. Parris Glendening pushed the smart-growth law through the General Assembly in 1997 and has become a national advocate for the policy.
NEWS
BY BOB MAGINNIS | February 26, 2002
In the struggle to trim Maryland's budget in an election year, the University Systems of Maryland campus proposed for downtown Hagerstown could be cut, Del. Sue Hecht told local business leaders last week. It's time for citizens to get involved in a lobbying efforts to see that it doesn't happen. The proposal would only cost $12.4 million, not a major expenditure in most years. But this is an election year and following a year in which surpluses vanished like snow on a warm sunny day, money is in short supply, for two reasons.
NEWS
May 19, 2000
Maryland Sen. Alex X. Mooney has challenged Gov. Parris Glendening to sign his petition opposing a new prevailing wage law. The governor, who sponsored the law to set minimum wage scales on school construction projects, has no intention of signing. Michael Morrill, Glendening's spokesman, called Mooney's effort "ill-informed and ill-advised. " The law will require contractors to pay workers set wages based on the average wages of construction workers in each county. Mooney, R-Frederick/Washington, contends it could increase the cost of renovating and building schools by 15 percent.
NEWS
July 20, 1999
Hagerstown City Councilman Alfred W. Boyer suggested Tuesday that the city withdraw its offer of the vacant city-owned Baldwin Complex as a free site for a University System of Maryland campus. "I believe this project is in jeopardy," Boyer said. He said efforts to convince state officials to locate the campus in downtown Hagerstown could "jeopardize the overall project. " Boyer's comments came during the comments portion of a council work session Tuesday evening. Boyer's request received no support from the mayor or other council members.
NEWS
October 10, 1997
Maryland state lawmakers toured the Charles Town Races this week, as a prelude to what is certain to be another attempt to legalize slot-machine gambling in Maryland. By all accounts, they seemed impressed with the renovated track and the number of Marylanders' cars they saw in the parking lot. It's what they didn't see that concerns us. The tour included about 30 Maryland lawmakers and aides, who are considering legalizing slot machines to help bail out Maryland's horse tracks.
NEWS
February 27, 2001
State budget amendment fails By LAURA ERNDE laurae@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - Maryland lawmakers have chosen not to give themselves more power over state spending. The Maryland Senate narrowly defeated a proposed Constitutional amendment on Tuesday that would have changed the 85-year-old process that gives the governor almost total control over the state budget. Legislators can only make cuts to the budget. Any additions must come from the governor.
NEWS
October 14, 1997
Maryland Gov. Parris Glendening on Monday told the Maryland Chamber of Commerce he's ready to change the way the state brings new jobs here. Instead of luring business from other areas, Glendening said, the new emphasis will be on improving job training in Maryland. The idea sounds good and it's in line with what top development specialists have been saying for several years, but the idea of totally abandoning the grant and loan programs that give some businesses an incentive to locate in Maryland is a little bit scary.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | March 9, 1999
ANNAPOLIS - Gov. Parris Glendening told a Washington County lawmaker he likes the idea of a University of Maryland satellite campus in Hagerstown. But he cautioned that paying for it might depend largely on whether the Maryland General Assembly approves his $1-a-pack tobacco tax increase, opposed by a majority of the Washington County Delegation. "(Glendening's) more than willing to talk with the delegation but he can't do it without their support," said Del. Sue Hecht, D-Frederick/Washington, who met with the governor on Monday.
NEWS
December 10, 1997
It's an elected official's dream: With an election year looming, the budget suddenly shows a large and unexpected surplus. That's the situation facing Maryland lawmakers now, and it will take some real strength of character to resist the temptation to make 1998 the year that nobody in Annapolis says "no. " How big is the surplus? By next June 30, it could be close to $900 million, way more than anyone predicted. But their failure to predict it hasn't stopped some lawmakers from dreaming up ways to spend it. Del. Robert Kittleman, R-Howard, make a persuasive argument that it's the people's money and that when times are good, it ought to be returned to them.
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NEWS
November 2, 2009
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) -- A study concludes that Maryland's smart-growth law isn't doing much to curb suburban sprawl. The study by University of Maryland scholars said the 12-year-old law is ineffective because it can't force builders to comply. The study also said Maryland hasn't given developers enough incentive to launch projects in older, urban neighborhoods. Former Gov. Parris Glendening pushed the smart-growth law through the General Assembly in 1997 and has become a national advocate for the policy.
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NEWS
February 28, 2009
It is a new year and a new legislative session has begun. In a testament to the ineffectiveness of Washington County's General Assembly delegation, virtually every interest group in the county has hired a lobbyist to bring back a fair share of state tax dollars. The list includes: the Chamber of Commerce, the Board of Education, the City of Hagerstown, environmental groups, historic preservation groups and practically any group hoping to fund the many needs of this community. Our delegation, through both Democratic and Republican administrations, has failed to bring home a fair share of state tax revenue.
NEWS
By ERIN JULIUS | January 9, 2008
HAGERSTOWN - Hagerstown is a successful national model of "smart growth" and must continue to focus on renovating and filling vacant buildings, former Maryland Gov. Parris Glendening said Tuesday after a tour of the downtown University System of Maryland at Hagerstown. The University System is housed in what once was the Baldwin House, a historic hotel on Washington Street. "We're here because you saw the light," JoEllen Barnhart, the University System's associate executive director told Glendening as she was introduced to the former governor.
NEWS
July 17, 2007
"I would just like to say that my child really appreciated the counselor that dressed up as a gorilla at Marty Snook pool. We think it's just really nice that they would entertain the kids like that with something so original and fun. " - Hagerstown "I want to say a huge thank you to whoever brought Taylor Hicks to The Maryland Theatre. Great show, great experience. He was so wonderful out front, signing autographs for the children. They loved him, and we hope he comes back.
NEWS
October 15, 2006
In the polls, the race for Maryland governor is close. It shouldn't be. Gov. Robert Ehrlich has done what he set out to do - put the brakes on spending and start getting Maryland's financial house in order. The important items he hasn't succeeded with - legalizing slot machines at the state's horse tracks and reforming the state's medical malpractice laws - failed because a legislature dominated by Democrats blocked them. These Democrats are the legislative leaders that backed electricity deregulation in 1999, then forgot about it until this year, when Baltimore Gas & Electric proposed a whopping 72 percent increase for its customers.
NEWS
January 17, 2006
Governor an independent voice To the editor: After reading an article in the Baltimore Sun ("A centrist? Ehrlich sees no shift in stance"), I am completely amazed by politicians (who just happened to be Democrats) who find it all right to criticize Gov. Robert Ehrlich for his political agendas, when in fact his views and their views on the issues at hand are very similar. Quoting Washington County Del. Christopher Shank, "Ehrlich should be commended, not criticized, for crafting a legislative agenda that can win bipartisan support.
NEWS
March 24, 2005
If Democratic leaders in the Maryland General Assembly are intent on proving they're motivated only by partisan politics, they are doing a good job. As the legislature heads toward adjournment, they need to spend their time on real issues instead of political spats. The latest bit of silliness surfaced this week when Del. Kumar Barve, D-Montgomery, introduced a bill that would force Republican Gov. Robert Ehrlich to admit that he initiated an increase in auto registration renewal fees.
NEWS
January 22, 2004
Thanks to Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich, $1 million has been added to the state budget to fund the start-up of the University System of Maryland's Hagerstown Education Center. Citizens interested in this vital project should send expressions of their appreciation to the governor and to the as-yet-unnamed local businesspeople funding a lobbyist's effort to shepherd the cash through the budget process. Under Maryland's constitution, only the governor can add money to the budget, but the legislature can cut it. We had expected Ehrlich to push the Washington County delegation for a public statement of support for his programs, but if promises have been made, they haven't yet been revealed.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | January 16, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - Maryland must learn to live within its means, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said Wednesday after he was sworn in as Maryland's 60th governor. "We should not be fearful of change, of reform, of better ideas, particularly where taxpayer dollars are concerned," Ehrlich told about 1,500 people gathered in front of the State House. Ehrlich, the state's first Republican governor in three decades, spent most of his 12-minute speech thanking family members for supporting him and his mentors for teaching him. He gave a nod to former Governors Marvin Mandel, Harry Hughes and William Donald Schaefer, who were on stage with him. In a prepared speech, Ehrlich planned to salute outgoing Gov. Parris Glendening.
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