Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsParole Board
IN THE NEWS

Parole Board

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 14, 2010
DRAPER, Utah (AP) -- A condemned Utah inmate has lost his bid for clemency from a state parole board, making his execution by firing squad on Friday more likely than ever. Ronnie Lee Gardner had asked the Utah Board of Pardons and Parole to show mercy and commuted his death sentence to life in prison without parole. The board denied the request on a unanimous vote, chairman Curtis Garner said Monday at hearing inside the Utah State Prison. In its written rationale, the board said the jury's verdict imposing Gardner's death sentence 25 years ago was not inappropriate and that no sufficient reason exists to grant clemency or to commute the convicted killer's sentence.
NEWS
By KAREN HANNA | July 29, 2007
Time in a county lockup got him clean, but church gave him new life, according to an inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution-Hagerstown who said he's free from the drugs that controlled him. "I'm through with that. That's the old life, I'm not even that person anymore," said Anthony Andrews, who said drug use first took him prisoner at the age of about 12. A born-again Christian, Andrews, 47, has tattoos of a lion and bare-breasted women on his arms. He said church services and activities such as guitar classes keep him sane.
NEWS
October 29, 1998
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Jurors in the trial of Michael Newell ended a second day of deliberations Wednesday without reaching a verdict on charges he murdered his 7-year-old niece last fall. Newell, 40, of Martinsburg, is charged with felony murder in the kidnapping and death of Jessica Newell, who disappeared from Pikeside Bowl on Sept. 18, 1997. --cont. from news page Her body was found two days later in a remote area of North Mountain.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | February 28, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The plea bargain offered to a man charged in the death of a Hagerstown woman was withdrawn two weeks ago, but was back in effect Thursday, meaning the case will most likely not go to trial, the Berkeley County prosecutor said Thursday. Harry William Deneen III, 25, had agreed more than two months ago to plead guilty to second-degree murder and an unrelated kidnapping charge. But Deneen continued to maintain his innocence and prosecutors withdrew the plea on Feb. 14. Now, Deneen, who has addresses in Martinsburg and Hagerstown, has spoken once again to police and Berkeley County Prosecutor Pamela Games-Neely said she was pleased with the results.
NEWS
By AMY WALLAUER | June 16, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A Martinsburg man was sentenced to one to five years in prison Monday after pleading no contest to a first-degree sexual abuse charge in an attack on a pregnant Martinsburg woman. Kenneth Gray, 36, also had been charged with kidnapping and first-degree sexual assault. Both of those charges were dropped Monday. "We knew we'd probably have some evidentiary problems at trial," said Berkeley County Prosecuting Attorney Pamela Games-Neely. According to court records, Gray was living at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Martinsburg, where he was being treated for substance abuse, around the time of the July 30, 1997, attack.
NEWS
October 29, 1998
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A jury this morning found Michael Newell guilty of felony murder without recommendation of mercy in the death of his 7-year-old niece last fall. Newell, 40, of Martinsburg, faces a mandatory life sentence without parole in the kidnapping and death of Jessica Newell, who disappeared from Pikeside Bowl on Sept. 18, 1997. Her body was found two days later in a remote area of North Mountain.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
"I am reading where they are asking people if the County Commuter buses should be shut down. I can't believe that they are even asking that. They all said no, that it shouldn't be shut down. I had to go two months without my car and I had to go with the bus. " "The number one bumper sticker that I would like to see is 'Welcome to America, now speak English,' followed by number two sticker, 'Hang up and drive. " "I see where the mother of a little boy who was sexually molested and murdered at a ball field in Frederick is suing the state and the parole board for releasing that inmate.
NEWS
By BRENDAN KIRBY | February 15, 1998
Inmates grow inside while helping those outside Prison is not exactly the easiest place to make money. But a service group inside the Maryland Correctional Institution south of Hagerstown has managed to raise enough cash to give away $150,000 over the last 10 years. To the beneficiaries, that money has meant Christmas presents for poor children, charity for troubled youths and reading lessons for illiterate prisoners. "There is no group that touches me the way this group does," said Mike Weller, who until recently headed up the Maryland Sheriffs' Youth Ranch in Buckeystown, Md. "It is just an absolutely amazing group.
NEWS
BY DAVE McMILLION | April 30, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com Despite testimony from character witnesses who said she should not be sent to jail, a judge on Monday sentenced a Martinsburg, W.Va., teacher to serve from 1 to 10 years in prison for her role in a drunken-driving death last year. Defense attorney Richard Douglas, of Martinsburg, argued in Jefferson County Circuit Court that Margo Fritsch should be placed on home confinement for her guilty plea to a charge of driving under the influence causing death.
NEWS
February 16, 2001
Letters to the Editor 2/18 Parole violators give the justice system a bad name To the editor: I never in my life thought I would be defending the Maryland Parole Commission, but the Dec. 10 letter, "Parole board costing taxpayers," mandates a response. The correspondent doesn't have a clue that it is he who costs taxpayers, not the parole commission. He made a stupid decision. He returned to prison for a parole violation - but it was his free choice and he has to accept responsibility for it. He can't put the blame on the Parole Commission.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 14, 2010
DRAPER, Utah (AP) -- A condemned Utah inmate has lost his bid for clemency from a state parole board, making his execution by firing squad on Friday more likely than ever. Ronnie Lee Gardner had asked the Utah Board of Pardons and Parole to show mercy and commuted his death sentence to life in prison without parole. The board denied the request on a unanimous vote, chairman Curtis Garner said Monday at hearing inside the Utah State Prison. In its written rationale, the board said the jury's verdict imposing Gardner's death sentence 25 years ago was not inappropriate and that no sufficient reason exists to grant clemency or to commute the convicted killer's sentence.
Advertisement
NEWS
By KAREN HANNA | July 29, 2007
Time in a county lockup got him clean, but church gave him new life, according to an inmate at the Maryland Correctional Institution-Hagerstown who said he's free from the drugs that controlled him. "I'm through with that. That's the old life, I'm not even that person anymore," said Anthony Andrews, who said drug use first took him prisoner at the age of about 12. A born-again Christian, Andrews, 47, has tattoos of a lion and bare-breasted women on his arms. He said church services and activities such as guitar classes keep him sane.
NEWS
by DON AINES | June 19, 2007
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell has nominated Franklin County Jail Warden John E. Wetzel to fill the corrections expert vacancy on the state Board of Pardons. "John's years of experience as a prison administrator will enable him to provide a unique and valued perspective that will contribute greatly to the board's deliberations and decisions," Rendell was quoted as saying in Friday's news release. "It's a pretty prestigious board, plus I'm interested in the justice system as a whole," Wetzel said Monday.
NEWS
September 30, 2003
"I am reading where they are asking people if the County Commuter buses should be shut down. I can't believe that they are even asking that. They all said no, that it shouldn't be shut down. I had to go two months without my car and I had to go with the bus. " "The number one bumper sticker that I would like to see is 'Welcome to America, now speak English,' followed by number two sticker, 'Hang up and drive. " "I see where the mother of a little boy who was sexually molested and murdered at a ball field in Frederick is suing the state and the parole board for releasing that inmate.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | February 28, 2003
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - The plea bargain offered to a man charged in the death of a Hagerstown woman was withdrawn two weeks ago, but was back in effect Thursday, meaning the case will most likely not go to trial, the Berkeley County prosecutor said Thursday. Harry William Deneen III, 25, had agreed more than two months ago to plead guilty to second-degree murder and an unrelated kidnapping charge. But Deneen continued to maintain his innocence and prosecutors withdrew the plea on Feb. 14. Now, Deneen, who has addresses in Martinsburg and Hagerstown, has spoken once again to police and Berkeley County Prosecutor Pamela Games-Neely said she was pleased with the results.
NEWS
BY DAVE McMILLION | April 30, 2002
charlestown@herald-mail.com Despite testimony from character witnesses who said she should not be sent to jail, a judge on Monday sentenced a Martinsburg, W.Va., teacher to serve from 1 to 10 years in prison for her role in a drunken-driving death last year. Defense attorney Richard Douglas, of Martinsburg, argued in Jefferson County Circuit Court that Margo Fritsch should be placed on home confinement for her guilty plea to a charge of driving under the influence causing death.
NEWS
February 16, 2001
Letters to the Editor 2/18 Parole violators give the justice system a bad name To the editor: I never in my life thought I would be defending the Maryland Parole Commission, but the Dec. 10 letter, "Parole board costing taxpayers," mandates a response. The correspondent doesn't have a clue that it is he who costs taxpayers, not the parole commission. He made a stupid decision. He returned to prison for a parole violation - but it was his free choice and he has to accept responsibility for it. He can't put the blame on the Parole Commission.
NEWS
October 29, 1998
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Jurors in the trial of Michael Newell ended a second day of deliberations Wednesday without reaching a verdict on charges he murdered his 7-year-old niece last fall. Newell, 40, of Martinsburg, is charged with felony murder in the kidnapping and death of Jessica Newell, who disappeared from Pikeside Bowl on Sept. 18, 1997. --cont. from news page Her body was found two days later in a remote area of North Mountain.
NEWS
October 29, 1998
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A jury this morning found Michael Newell guilty of felony murder without recommendation of mercy in the death of his 7-year-old niece last fall. Newell, 40, of Martinsburg, faces a mandatory life sentence without parole in the kidnapping and death of Jessica Newell, who disappeared from Pikeside Bowl on Sept. 18, 1997. Her body was found two days later in a remote area of North Mountain.
NEWS
By AMY WALLAUER | June 16, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A Martinsburg man was sentenced to one to five years in prison Monday after pleading no contest to a first-degree sexual abuse charge in an attack on a pregnant Martinsburg woman. Kenneth Gray, 36, also had been charged with kidnapping and first-degree sexual assault. Both of those charges were dropped Monday. "We knew we'd probably have some evidentiary problems at trial," said Berkeley County Prosecuting Attorney Pamela Games-Neely. According to court records, Gray was living at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Martinsburg, where he was being treated for substance abuse, around the time of the July 30, 1997, attack.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|