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Oversight

NEWS
by TARA REILLY | August 11, 2004
A proposal to give Washington County oversight of ambulance operations in the county is on hold for at least two weeks. The Washington County Commissioners decided Tuesday to allow Washington County Volunteer Fire and Rescue Association members to vote on the proposal. Commissioners President Gregory I. Snook said he wanted the association to vote before the commissioners decide whether to create an emergency medical services coordinator, who would oversee activities of ambulance companies.
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NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | April 8, 2004
laurae@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - Washington County's tip jar gambling bill, which would block groups who operate tip jars from also selling gaming supplies, passed a crucial test Wednesday when it was approved unanimously by a Senate panel. Sen. Donald F. Munson fought off several attempts to change the bill, which is aimed at preserving oversight of $83 million a year in gambling. Munson, R-Washington, argued that even minor changes to the bill would jeopardize its chances for passage before the session ends at midnight Monday.
NEWS
March 19, 2004
Not eager to get involved in what has become a messy local dispute, a committee of the Maryland General Assembly last week asked local lawmakers to compromise on legislation affecting the redevelopment of the former Fort Ritchie Army base. County Commissioner James Kercheval has offered a plan that looks like a winner. It's time to accept it and get on with more important matters. Bills were filed to restructure the board of the PenMar Development Corp. after the appointment of several new people prompted the resignation of other, veteran members.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | March 15, 2004
As the Washington County's General Assembly delegation and the board of PenMar Development Corp. battle over whether some of PenMar's newer members will be removed, one important player has been reduced to sitting on the sidelines. Lerner Enterprises, which has been in negotiation to be the "master developer" of the old Fort Ritchie Army base, has never been contacted by state officials about how the bill would affect ongoing talks. So said Kevin Rogers, the chief operating officer of Oak Hill Properties and an employee of Lerner, a 50-year-old company that has developed a ton a projects in the metropolitan Washington area.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | March 3, 2004
tarar@herald-mail.com The PenMar Development Corp. has asked the Washington County Commissioners and the local Chamber of Commerce to oppose proposed state legislation that would dissolve the PenMar board of directors. So far, the state-created agency charged with redeveloping the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base has no takers. The County Commissioners didn't take an official position after being asked Tuesday by PenMar officials, nor did they state the reasons for their inaction.
NEWS
March 2, 2004
Pushed by the prospect of even higher deficits in fiscal 2005-2006, the West Virginia Legislature is looking at ways to squeeze more dollars out of the state's higher education budget. After $45 million in cuts, the system is unlikely to yield the bonanza needed to cover the shortfall. But lawmakers should still resist the temptation to write college budgets themselves, as one bill proposes. Under HB 4712, written by the House Education Committee, the four-year-old Higher Education Policy Committee would be abolished.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | December 2, 2003
tarar@herald-mail.com Del. Christopher B. Shank said Monday during a meeting with the Cascade Committee that he thought the state should have more oversight of the PenMar Development Corp., possibly by appointing some members of the agency's board of directors and having a state representative on that board. He also repeated a position he made public last month that PenMar board members should be residents of Washington County, but that he would consider that it be open to state residents as a compromise.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | November 21, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com The Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau, the executive director of which recently was forced to resign amid allegations of misappropriation of agency money, needs closer oversight, state lawmakers said Thursday. Convention and Visitors Bureau board Chairman Ron Vitkun has said Ben Hart was asked to resign Oct. 27 after an internal investigation into the matter. Hagerstown Police launched an investigation at the request of the bureau.
NEWS
By Karl Weissenbach | October 20, 2003
The Cascade Committee extends its thanks to the Board of Washington County Commissioners and the PenMar Development Corporation Board of Directors for their unanimous votes to lease the mothballed Fort Ritchie gym to the Chewsville, Smithsburg, and Leitersburg (CSL) Sports League. We also wish to thank the Army's Bill SpiglEr and his team for offering to work with the CSL and PMDC regarding the use of the Fort Ritchie parade fields for additional recreational sports. Further, we salute CSL President Carrie Gouff and her board for sticking with its year-long effort to use the gym even when it looked as if property on the closed base was off-limits to nonprofits involved in any kind of community service.
NEWS
December 19, 2000
City Council endorses permits for dry clubs By DAN KULIN / Staff Writer A law requiring commercial, non-alcoholic entertainment clubs in Hagerstown to get a $500 license annually was unanimously endorsed Tuesday by the City Council. A final vote on the licensing law is expected Jan. 30. Entertainment clubs and businesses exempt from the proposed law include theaters, restaurants, clubs sponsored or operated by a government, educational institution, or religious, charitable, benevolent, fraternal or social organization.
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