Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsOven
IN THE NEWS

Oven

NEWS
By DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | October 23, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com KEARNEYSVILLE, W.VA. Seconds past 3 p.m. Saturday, Wayne Braunstein called out seven simple words. The small crowd that had assembled at the historic Peter Burr Living History Farm near Kearneysville, many of them waiting with bated breath for just those words, filed into the farmhouse. The words: "Ladies and gentlemen, this way for bread. " The bread is just that good. "Definitely," said Laura Kingsbury, a Harpers Ferry, W.Va.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 24, 2004
Stuffed Sugar Pumpkin 1 (6- to 8-pound) pumpkin 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1 pound sausage 1 cup chopped onion 1 cup chopped celery 10 cups fresh white bread cubes 1 teaspoon fresh or dried sage 1/2 teaspoon thyme 1/4 teaspoon pepper 2 eggs, beaten 3/4 cup chicken broth Wash pumpkin. Cut and reserve top. Scoop seeds from pumpkin. Pick inside of cavity all over with fork. Rub cavity with salt and mustard.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | October 16, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Maybe the best way to capture the atmosphere inside the kitchen classroom at Martinsburg High School Friday morning, as a group of students made apple pies, is to relate just a few of the comments overheard in a half-hour period. The students peeled and cored apples. They measured and mixed the ingredients needed to make crusts. They debated how many and which variety of apples should be used. And they talked. "It's all about the technique," one girl said.
NEWS
April 21, 2004
For the tastiest lemons, choose fruits that are small, either round or oval, and rich yellow in color with a thin, smooth-textured skin. A good lemon also will feel heavy for its size and yield just a little to the touch, accordig to the Saticoy Lemon Association at www.saticoylemon.com on the Web. The association suggests a variety of uses for lemons, including: Pierce a whole lemon a number of times with a fork, then stuff it in the cavity of a chicken or turkey before roasting to keep the breast meat moist and imbue the whole bird with flavor.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | December 2, 2003
Before the days of television remotes and mute buttons, my grandparents had a lengthy black cord that ran from the back of their television set to a plastic, oval toggle switch that was snapped to turn off the sound of commercials. Possession of this switch was a sacred trust, so at age 7 - long before "responsibility" became a bad word in my vocabulary - I always wanted to be the Very Important Person charged with handling the chore. But I had a tendency to daydream and wasn't always up to the job. If so much as one millisecond of commercialistic audio reached our ears, a howl would go up in the living room, mostly in the form of "What are you doing?
NEWS
November 19, 2003
Timetable for roasting a turkey at 325 degrees with the conventional oven open pan method: Unstuffed turkey 8 to 12 pounds 2 3/4 to 3 hours 12 to 14 pounds 3 to 3 3/4 hours 14 to 18 pounds 3 3/4 to 4 1/4 hours 18 to 20 pounds 4 1/4 to 4 1/2 hours 20 to 24 pounds 4 1/2 to 5 hours Stuffed turkey 8 to 12 pounds 3 to 3 1/2 hours 12 to 14 pounds 3 1/2 to 4 hours 14 to 18 pounds 4 to 4 1/4 hours...
NEWS
December 4, 2002
Almond Toffee Brickle 40 saltine crackers 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup butter 12 ounces chocolate morsels 1 cup chopped almonds Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cover bottom and sides of jellyroll pan with aluminum foil. Place crackers side by side, not overlapping. Set aside. Melt butter in saucepan. Add brown sugar. Bring to a full rolling boil. Boil exactly 3 minutes; stir often. Remove from heat and pour immediately over saltines.
NEWS
by PAT SCHOOLEY | July 21, 2002
An imposing six-bay house sits on a bluff above Burnside Bridge Road on the southern side of Antietam National Battlefield. The cellar opens at ground level, and a porch stretches the full width of the building at its brow. A small stream winds along the floodplain at the foot of the bluff, and the roofless remains of a stone springhouse stand near it. A metal-roofed stone bank barn stands behind the house to the right, and a brick smokehouse with a steeply pitched hip roof and collapsed north wall stands to the left.
NEWS
by LISA TEDRICK PREJEAN | July 12, 2002
Two weeks ago I wrote a column about how crayons are made. We asked readers to take a little quiz. There were two questions: What were the eight colors in the original box of Crayola crayons, circa 1903? and What is George W. Bush's favorite crayon color? Seventeen people e-mailed responses. Only four of the entrants had all the original colors and Bush's favorite color correct. We drew a name at random from the correct four. William Bulla of Hagerstown is the winner of the $25 prize.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | February 27, 2002
CLEAR SPRING - A fire caused by a failed microwave oven forced a St. Paul Road family to stay elsewhere Tuesday night. "I heard an explosion," said Joyce Krause, of 14646 St. Paul Road. "I heard my little girl holler the kitchen was on fire. " Krause, her 4-year-old daughter, and her 21-month-old grandson made it safely out of the house, she said. "I'm just thankful they got out," said Krause's husband, Michael. Krause said he'd never heard of a microwave oven failing and causing a fire.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|