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NEWS
November 30, 1998
Some Hagerstown water customers have noticed an unpleasant odor or taste in their tap water in recent weeks. The water is safe to drink, said Water Department Manager Gene Walzl. The unpleasant taste is an annual problem that occurs in the fall when algae and decaying leaves and organic matter settle in the Potomac River and Edgemont Reservoir, Walzl said. The city relies on rain to push the algae and decaying matter downstream, but the fall has been dry, he said. Walzl said he's received a few complaints on and off in the last four weeks.
NEWS
by JEFF SEMLER | February 13, 2007
We hear a great deal these days about natural, organic and sustainable agriculture. The problem is these words mean many different things to many different people. Organic is the only word that is certified in any way and even that certification is not without its critics. Natural is a very difficult one to codify. Almost everything is natural in some state. Even products resulting from processing can contain 100 percent natural components. Sustainable also means many things to many people.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | September 6, 2008
Wilson College, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and Penn State Cooperative Extension will offer a composting workshop. Participants who are Franklin County residents and register in advance will receive a free back yard composting bin, as long as supplies last. Only one bin will be given per household. Seating is limited to 25. The workshop is from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 13, in the Owens Barn at the Richard Alsina Fulton Center for Sustainable Living at Wilson College, 1015 Philadelphia Avenue, Chambersburg, Pa. A campus map is available online at http://www.
NEWS
July 15, 2008
Soil is not dirt. Dirt is what you sweep up off the floor or what your mother told you to wash from behind your ears. Soil on the other hand is quite different; Wikipedia describes soil as the naturally occurring, unconsolidated or loose covering of broken rock particles and decaying organic matter (humus) on the surface of the Earth, capable of supporting life. However, Webster captures the essence of soil by defining it as a medium in which something takes hold and develops. In my line of work we talk about soil a lot. There are several things about soil or should I say people's perception of soil that bugs me. First, is top soil; top soil is regarded by many as some sort of "Holy Grail.
NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | May 31, 2010
Got weeds? If you garden, you have weeds. They are an unfortunate fact of life that makes for much wringing of hands and gnashing of teeth. What's a gardener to do? Traditional weed control involves pulling, digging, spraying and cursing. There must be a better way. Noted garden writer and horticulturalist Lee Reich has a plan. I heard Lee speak recently at a Master Gardener conference about "weedless gardening," the title of his newest book, and I was intrigued. Surely this PhD pro who did plant and soil research with both the USDA and Cornell University could teach me a thing or two. Lee has developed a four-prong approach to dealing with weeds that makes a lot of sense.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | March 7, 2009
Q: How much and what kind of fertilizer should be used for tomatoes? Please describe fertilizer by ingredient ratio, such as 10-10-10, if possible. A: The first thing that should be done is to have your soil tested. This is more important if it is a new garden. Follow the directions that come with the container from the testing laboratory. It is often a good idea to label the soil as having come from a vegetable garden or a lawn because the testing lab is used to giving results to farmers.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | July 26, 2008
Anyone who has ever grown potatoes is familiar with the Colorado potato beetle. As larvae it is reddish in colors, while the adults are yellow and black striped with a brown head. They eat the leaves of the potato plant and will strip a plant bare if left uncontrolled. Potatoes are damaged right now by the Colorado potato beetle because the plant is using all its energy to form the potato tubers. The loss of leaf surface means less area to produce food, which will decrease your yield.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG, Creators Syndicate | June 26, 2009
Q: Will mulch cause a problem for native plants in my flowerbeds? A: Think of what ecosystem the plants came from and what kind of ecosystem you are recreating in your flowerbeds. If it is a northern woodland plant, it would have had a loose soil with lots of debris on top, so bark or pine needle mulch is fine. A loose layer of any organic material will help retain soil moisture and reduce weed growth. As the material decays, it will help form a good organic soil. Prairies do build up organic matter on the soil that decays, but it is not woody material.
NEWS
December 20, 2008
By MAUREEN GILMER Scripps Howard News Service Blueberries are the hottest food-bearing plant on the market due to antioxidant content and sky-high grocery-store prices. In recent decades, breeding has resulted in dozens of varieties that extend the blueberry climate limitations to include the far north and far south. There is a huge range of sizes, from rangy shrubs to squat 2-foot-tall dwarfs. Plus, early- to late-yielding varieties extend the harvest season from weeks to months.
NEWS
September 16, 2008
Today, many folks are generations removed from the farm and in addition to their loss of connection they make very little effort to learn anything about agriculture. Upon a recent visit to Mt. Vernon, I was reminded there was a time in this nation's history that agrarian pursuits were not looked down upon. Many people today think if you cannot do it with a computer then it is not worth doing. While I enjoy much of the benefits that computers afford us I still prefer potato chips over computer chips when it comes to eating.
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NEWS
By ANNETTE IPSAN | May 31, 2010
Got weeds? If you garden, you have weeds. They are an unfortunate fact of life that makes for much wringing of hands and gnashing of teeth. What's a gardener to do? Traditional weed control involves pulling, digging, spraying and cursing. There must be a better way. Noted garden writer and horticulturalist Lee Reich has a plan. I heard Lee speak recently at a Master Gardener conference about "weedless gardening," the title of his newest book, and I was intrigued. Surely this PhD pro who did plant and soil research with both the USDA and Cornell University could teach me a thing or two. Lee has developed a four-prong approach to dealing with weeds that makes a lot of sense.
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NEWS
By JEFF RUGG, Creators Syndicate | June 26, 2009
Q: Will mulch cause a problem for native plants in my flowerbeds? A: Think of what ecosystem the plants came from and what kind of ecosystem you are recreating in your flowerbeds. If it is a northern woodland plant, it would have had a loose soil with lots of debris on top, so bark or pine needle mulch is fine. A loose layer of any organic material will help retain soil moisture and reduce weed growth. As the material decays, it will help form a good organic soil. Prairies do build up organic matter on the soil that decays, but it is not woody material.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | March 7, 2009
Q: How much and what kind of fertilizer should be used for tomatoes? Please describe fertilizer by ingredient ratio, such as 10-10-10, if possible. A: The first thing that should be done is to have your soil tested. This is more important if it is a new garden. Follow the directions that come with the container from the testing laboratory. It is often a good idea to label the soil as having come from a vegetable garden or a lawn because the testing lab is used to giving results to farmers.
NEWS
December 20, 2008
By MAUREEN GILMER Scripps Howard News Service Blueberries are the hottest food-bearing plant on the market due to antioxidant content and sky-high grocery-store prices. In recent decades, breeding has resulted in dozens of varieties that extend the blueberry climate limitations to include the far north and far south. There is a huge range of sizes, from rangy shrubs to squat 2-foot-tall dwarfs. Plus, early- to late-yielding varieties extend the harvest season from weeks to months.
NEWS
September 16, 2008
Today, many folks are generations removed from the farm and in addition to their loss of connection they make very little effort to learn anything about agriculture. Upon a recent visit to Mt. Vernon, I was reminded there was a time in this nation's history that agrarian pursuits were not looked down upon. Many people today think if you cannot do it with a computer then it is not worth doing. While I enjoy much of the benefits that computers afford us I still prefer potato chips over computer chips when it comes to eating.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | September 6, 2008
Wilson College, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and Penn State Cooperative Extension will offer a composting workshop. Participants who are Franklin County residents and register in advance will receive a free back yard composting bin, as long as supplies last. Only one bin will be given per household. Seating is limited to 25. The workshop is from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Sept. 13, in the Owens Barn at the Richard Alsina Fulton Center for Sustainable Living at Wilson College, 1015 Philadelphia Avenue, Chambersburg, Pa. A campus map is available online at http://www.
NEWS
By BOB KESSLER | July 26, 2008
Anyone who has ever grown potatoes is familiar with the Colorado potato beetle. As larvae it is reddish in colors, while the adults are yellow and black striped with a brown head. They eat the leaves of the potato plant and will strip a plant bare if left uncontrolled. Potatoes are damaged right now by the Colorado potato beetle because the plant is using all its energy to form the potato tubers. The loss of leaf surface means less area to produce food, which will decrease your yield.
NEWS
July 15, 2008
Soil is not dirt. Dirt is what you sweep up off the floor or what your mother told you to wash from behind your ears. Soil on the other hand is quite different; Wikipedia describes soil as the naturally occurring, unconsolidated or loose covering of broken rock particles and decaying organic matter (humus) on the surface of the Earth, capable of supporting life. However, Webster captures the essence of soil by defining it as a medium in which something takes hold and develops. In my line of work we talk about soil a lot. There are several things about soil or should I say people's perception of soil that bugs me. First, is top soil; top soil is regarded by many as some sort of "Holy Grail.
NEWS
by JEFF SEMLER | February 13, 2007
We hear a great deal these days about natural, organic and sustainable agriculture. The problem is these words mean many different things to many different people. Organic is the only word that is certified in any way and even that certification is not without its critics. Natural is a very difficult one to codify. Almost everything is natural in some state. Even products resulting from processing can contain 100 percent natural components. Sustainable also means many things to many people.
NEWS
November 30, 1998
Some Hagerstown water customers have noticed an unpleasant odor or taste in their tap water in recent weeks. The water is safe to drink, said Water Department Manager Gene Walzl. The unpleasant taste is an annual problem that occurs in the fall when algae and decaying leaves and organic matter settle in the Potomac River and Edgemont Reservoir, Walzl said. The city relies on rain to push the algae and decaying matter downstream, but the fall has been dry, he said. Walzl said he's received a few complaints on and off in the last four weeks.
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