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Organ Donation

NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | April 25, 2003
laurae@herald-mail.com Eight years ago, Michael Butler was running an obstacle course for his job with the Frederick County Sheriff's Department when he collapsed at the finish line and could not get up. Tests revealed that he had kidney failure, most likely caused by diabetes. After eight months of taking dialysis 31/2 hours a day, three times a week, transplant organizers found him a donor kidney and pancreas. Butler's new organs came from a 27-year-old woman named Kelly, who died from a brain aneurysm.
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NEWS
April 1, 2002
Don't hold your breath Hagerstown Community College presents a free public forum on asthma and allergy issues Tuesday, April 9, from 7 to 9 p.m., in Kepler Theater. Dr. Nicholas Orfan will speak on allergic reactions, the role of the immune system, how to recognize the disease, and how to reduce the impact of the disease. Participants will also discuss what triggers asthma and how to manage it, the role of the allergist, and asthma and allergy medications. Register by calling Julie House at 301-790-2800, ext. 442. Registration is also available at the door.
NEWS
April 25, 1999
By ANDREA BROWN-HURLEY / Staff Writer photo: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer KNOXVILLE - Asher Wolf is literally weighing his options before departing Saturday on a solitary six-month hike to raise awareness about organ donation. The kidney transplant recipient will leave behind his Walkman and his favorite journal, which weighs in at 1 pound. [cont. from front page ] Even underwear "strikes me as weight I don't need," said Wolf, 24. As he hikes along the 2,160-mile Appalachian Trail, the Washington County resident will be accompanied only by his thoughts.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
How far would you be willing to go to save a child's life? Before you answer, read the following story: Jordy Carper, a 10-year-old boy from Hedgesville, W.Va. has cystic fibrosis, an inherited disease which allows mucus to clog the lungs, which are then more susceptible to infection. Last month, Jordy was checked into Childrens Hospital in Los Angeles, where doctors tried to overcome his body's resistance to antibiotics so the boy could receive a partial lung transplant with tissue donated by his mother and grandmother.
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