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NEWS
by KAREN HANNA | March 29, 2007
SHARPSBURG - In a sun-dappled field, where molten lead once rained from the sky, researchers armed with metal detectors listened for evidence from America's bloodiest one-day battle. Stephen R. Potter, who headed a team of National Park Service archaeologists at Antietam National Battlefield, said Tuesday that the group, which included a couple of amateur metal detectorists, was studying an area of Piper Orchard where the 7th Maine fled from a smaller Confederate force. "I don't think they would've been able to drive the Maine guys back if they wouldn't have had the artillery that they had, because what we're finding out here is pretty nasty stuff," Potter said.
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NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 22, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A Berkeley County man sought in connection with breaking-and-enterings at several businesses in recent weeks was caught by police Tuesday evening after a vehicle and foot pursuit that began on U.S. 11 north of Martinsburg and ended in an apple orchard near Hedgesville, W.Va. Ronald Dale "Georgie" Whetzel, 37, of 4379 Shepherdstown Road, Martinsburg, was arraigned Wednesday by Berkeley County Magistrate Harry L. Snow on three counts of breaking and entering, three counts of conspiracy, two counts of grand larceny and one count of obstructing an officer, court records show.
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | October 26, 2006
BUCK VALLEY, Pa. - Augusta Schetrompf probably would be the first to admit she has slowed down a little since she put together her stunning 50-state quilt about 10 years ago. After all, she was only 91 then. It might have been her last quilt, but it wasn't her first. She has been quilting for more years than she can remember. On Sept. 26, Augusta turned 101. She welcomed friends and family to her home north of Hancock and enjoyed gifts, including several arrangements of fall flowers.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | April 29, 2006
WAYNESBORO, PA. Representatives of a Wyomissing, Pa., developer assured Washington Township, Pa., officials on Friday that conditions will be closely monitored as crews move soil contaminated with arsenic and lead at an apple orchard on Old Forge Road. Carlino Development Group agreed to provide a PowerPoint presentation to the public at a 7 p.m. workshop meeting May 10. The supervisors and residents have expressed concerns about toxins spreading to the water and air as 6 inches of soil are scraped off and mounded at the site prior to construction of approximately 500 homes for the Thornhill Development.
NEWS
by JENNIFER FITCH | April 28, 2006
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Washington Township, Pa., officials and representatives of Carlino Development Group of Wyomissing, Pa., are scheduled to talk today about what one resident recently called "our own, very personal 187-acre Superfund site. " Pat O'Connor was referring to the Thornhill Development in planning stages on a former apple orchard on Old Forge Road. Pesticides applied to the apples over several decades have left arsenic and lead in the soil, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Spokesman John Repetz said.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | December 21, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com GREENCASTLE, Pa. - A family-owned, five-generation orchard on Tuesday became the first fruit operation to be preserved in Franklin County. Tracey's Orchard, just east of Greencastle, officially was entered into the Franklin County Agricultural Land Preservation Program, which acquires the right to develop the land. The farm will remain agricultural land in perpetuity. The amount paid to the landowner is the difference between the value of the land for development and its value as farmland.
NEWS
by DANIEL J. SERNOVITZ | May 1, 2005
daniels@herald-mail.com RINGGOLD - Last week, bees were on J.D. Rinehart's mind. Orchard workers have just about two weeks to pollinate the apple trees, and Rinehart was hoping temperatures would climb into the 70s or 80s, optimum weather for the task. The bees were not buzzing, nor were they anywhere to be seen, as Rinehart walked from the 80 acres of peach trees on one side of Mong Road to his truck on this overcast Tuesday morning. In a moment he would be heading the short distance down Rinehart Road to the apple trees where, again, no bees were to be found.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | September 22, 2004
pepperb@herald-mail.com WASHINGTON COUNTY - Feeling morning dew dampen the cuffs of his prison-issued pants and the crisp chill of an early autumn day, Michael Broadway picks through Roxbury Correctional Institution's apple orchard and has a sense of freedom. Broadway was among a handful of Maryland Correctional Training Center prerelease inmates who picked Red Delicious apples Tuesday at an orchard just outside the Roxbury Correctional Institution, a medium-security prison set off from two others on Roxbury Road off Sharpsburg Pike.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | May 9, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARLOWE, W.VA. - More than 50 years ago in a small West Virginia town called Marlowe, there lived a boy named Cecil Foltz. Like most boys of that era, Cecil had a fondness for apples. Lulled by an orchard next to his school, Cecil one day stole an apple from a tree. Promptly caught, he was ushered into the principal's office. Rather than face the administrator's wrath, Cecil, 12 or 13 years old, hopped out the principal's office window - a second-floor window - and slid down a flagpole.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | April 10, 2003
waynesboro@herald-mail.com The owners of a 78-acre working farm that has been in the same family since 1816 say they will fight an attempt to take by eminent domain the land that lies in the path of a planned seven-mile bypass around Washington Township. The Washington Township Supervisors voted Monday to authorize their attorney to start the legal process to take the 187-year-old Shank Farm owned by Barry G. and Annie R. Pifer of Germantown, Md. "We're going to fight this as best we can," Barry G. Pifer said.
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