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By TRISH RUDDER | January 4, 2009
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- Long before being sworn in as the new Morgan County commissioner, Stacy A. Dugan was thinking about bringing some changes to the community. Dugan, 38, said she wants to improve the county's accessibility to the public. One way is by using the county's Web site to show the public how money is being spent. For instance, Dugan said, if a check is written to any provider, the public could find out who received the money and for what it is being used.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | March 13, 2005
When Maryland Gov. Robert Ehrlich barred all state employees from talking to two writers for The (Baltimore) Sun last fall, many citizens assumed that this was a fight between the press and the government. It's much more than that. It's an effort by an elected official to control who covers his administration. And the message is clear: Those who ask the tough questions or take him to task will be excluded. If Ehrlich's order were an isolated incident, that would be one thing.
NEWS
March 13, 2006
This week, media across the country are jointly shining light on open government issues in what has become known as Sunshine Week. The Herald-Mail participated Sunday and is taking part again today. Members of the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association - including The Herald-Mail - have agreed to share their open government stories with each other this week, to reach as many people as possible. To learn how to file a Freedom of Information Act request, go to www.herald-mail.
NEWS
March 12, 2006
Starting today, media across the country are jointly shining light on open government issues in what has become known as Sunshine Week. The Herald-Mail is participating today and Monday. Members of the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association, including The Herald-Mail, have agreed to share their open government stories with each other this week, to reach as many people as possible. To learn how to file a Freedom of Information Act request, go to www.herald-mail.com . To read more about the nationwide project, go to www.sunshineweek.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
What it is? Sunshine Week is a national initiative to open a dialogue about the importance of open government and freedom of information. Participants include print, broadcast and online news media, civic groups, libraries, nonprofits, schools and others interested in the public's right to know. The Florida Society of Newspaper Editors (FSNE) launched Sunshine Sunday in 2002 in response to efforts by some Florida legislators to create scores of new exemptions to the state's public records law. FSNE estimates that some 300 exemptions to open government laws were defeated in the legislative sessions that followed its three Sunshine Sundays because of the increased public and legislative awareness that resulted from the Sunshine Sunday reports and commentary.
NEWS
By Andrew Schotz | March 12, 2006
William Russell challenged his city council on a confusing open government statute and won. In 2002, the Frostburg City Council in Allegany County, Md., met privately one day. Then, at a public meeting the next day, the council announced a change in the government chain of command. As a citizen, Russell objected. At the time, the city council called its private meeting an executive session to discuss specific employees. But, in a letter to the state's Open Meetings Compliance Board, the council changed course and said the discussion was covered by the state's executive function clause.
NEWS
by JIM LEE / Carroll County Times | March 11, 2007
January's audit of Maryland emergency management offices marks the third time in seven years that government agencies have performed poorly when it comes to responding to requests for public information. In 2000, auditors organized by the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association were denied 50 percent of the time when they asked county offices for several common records, including nursing home inspection reports, the school superintendent's contract and routine police logs. In 2003, the press association sent out auditors to 15 state agencies.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | November 5, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Democrat Stacy Dugan captured the Morgan County Commission's District 2 seat from Republican incumbent Glen R. Stotler, according to complete but unofficial results from Tuesday's election. Dugan received 4,038 votes from Morgan County's 13 precincts. Stotler received 3,139 votes. The six-year term has a yearly salary of $35,640. "I will work hard for the community and make sure their voices are heard. I'll bring open government to Morgan County," Dugan said after learning of her victory.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | November 5, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- Democrat Stacy Dugan captured the Morgan County Commission's District 2 seat from Republican incumbent Glen R. Stotler, according to complete but unofficial results from Tuesday's election.  Dugan received 4,038 votes from Morgan County's 13 precincts. Stotler received 3,139 votes. The six-year term has a yearly salary of $35,640. "I will work hard for the community and make sure their voices are heard. I'll bring open government to Morgan County," Dugan said after learning of her victory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | May 1, 2010
o Bulk of information requests related to fire, police calls WASHINGTON COUNTY -- A one-page photocopy that costs 25 cents at Hagerstown City Hall will cost 20 times as much -- $5 -- at the Hagerstown Police Department. The gap illustrates the wide latitude in providing public information in Maryland, where the law gives little guidance. Maryland's Public Information Act (PIA) says government agencies may charge a "reasonable" fee for public records. "Reasonable" is defined as "bearing a reasonable relationship to the recovery of actual costs incurred by a governmental unit.
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NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | January 4, 2009
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- Long before being sworn in as the new Morgan County commissioner, Stacy A. Dugan was thinking about bringing some changes to the community. Dugan, 38, said she wants to improve the county's accessibility to the public. One way is by using the county's Web site to show the public how money is being spent. For instance, Dugan said, if a check is written to any provider, the public could find out who received the money and for what it is being used.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | November 5, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Democrat Stacy Dugan captured the Morgan County Commission's District 2 seat from Republican incumbent Glen R. Stotler, according to complete but unofficial results from Tuesday's election. Dugan received 4,038 votes from Morgan County's 13 precincts. Stotler received 3,139 votes. The six-year term has a yearly salary of $35,640. "I will work hard for the community and make sure their voices are heard. I'll bring open government to Morgan County," Dugan said after learning of her victory.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | November 5, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- Democrat Stacy Dugan captured the Morgan County Commission's District 2 seat from Republican incumbent Glen R. Stotler, according to complete but unofficial results from Tuesday's election.  Dugan received 4,038 votes from Morgan County's 13 precincts. Stotler received 3,139 votes. The six-year term has a yearly salary of $35,640. "I will work hard for the community and make sure their voices are heard. I'll bring open government to Morgan County," Dugan said after learning of her victory.
NEWS
By TRISH RUDDER | April 22, 2008
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. -- About 142 people showed up Sunday afternoon at American Legion Post 60 to listen to local candidates talk about why they deserve votes in the May 13 primary election. Republican, Democratic and nonpartisan school board candidates talked about the office they are seeking, and they also were asked to answer written questions from the audience. County Commission Glen R. Stotler, incumbent Republican, is seeking re-election to the Morgan County Commission seat in Magisterial District 2. He is serving his 24th year as commissioner.
NEWS
March 14, 2008
On Monday, Mar. 16, The Herald-Mail will join newspapers and broadcasters across the nation in celebrating "Sunshine Week," which is designed to develop public support for open government. Newspapers and other news-gathering organizations need the public's support because, all too often, government tends to view the search for information as just the media's curiosity, as opposed to the people's right to know. But before detailing the progress that still needs to be achieved, it's appropriate to take notice of the recent progress that has been made.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
What it is? Sunshine Week is a national initiative to open a dialogue about the importance of open government and freedom of information. Participants include print, broadcast and online news media, civic groups, libraries, nonprofits, schools and others interested in the public's right to know. The Florida Society of Newspaper Editors (FSNE) launched Sunshine Sunday in 2002 in response to efforts by some Florida legislators to create scores of new exemptions to the state's public records law. FSNE estimates that some 300 exemptions to open government laws were defeated in the legislative sessions that followed its three Sunshine Sundays because of the increased public and legislative awareness that resulted from the Sunshine Sunday reports and commentary.
NEWS
by JIM LEE / Carroll County Times | March 11, 2007
January's audit of Maryland emergency management offices marks the third time in seven years that government agencies have performed poorly when it comes to responding to requests for public information. In 2000, auditors organized by the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association were denied 50 percent of the time when they asked county offices for several common records, including nursing home inspection reports, the school superintendent's contract and routine police logs. In 2003, the press association sent out auditors to 15 state agencies.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | March 4, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - Managing growth, rising property taxes and limited water and sewer capacities are among the many issues Gregory B. Murray expects to face in his new role as Washington County administrator. But one of his biggest challenges, he said, deals with perception. Murray, 46, wants to change "the stigma that county government is inefficient or not there to serve the citizens. " "We want to make sure that all citizens realize that county government is their government," Murray said.
NEWS
March 13, 2006
This week, media across the country are jointly shining light on open government issues in what has become known as Sunshine Week. The Herald-Mail participated Sunday and is taking part again today. Members of the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association - including The Herald-Mail - have agreed to share their open government stories with each other this week, to reach as many people as possible. To learn how to file a Freedom of Information Act request, go to www.herald-mail.
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