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OBITUARIES
January 6, 2012
George Robert Lott, 86, of Hagerstown, Md., and formerly of Long Island, N.Y., died Saturday, Dec. 24, 2011. He was the loving husband of Lois; loving father of Stephanie Prianti (Richard), Amanda Shenstone (Mark), and predeceased by son, James; loving grandfather of Jaime, Leah, Esperanza, and predeceased by granddaughter, Laurel; loving great-grandfather of Chloe; uncle to many nieces and nephews; and predeceased by sister, Alice, and brothers, James and Charles. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, serving on D-Day, first wave at Normandy, Omaha Beach, on June 6, 1944, and D-Day, Iwo Jima, in February 1945.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | June 5, 2012
German machine-gun fire hammered on the door of Arthur Staymates' landing craft as it approached Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. Now a gray-haired octogenarian, Staymates said that the American soldiers believed they would be cut to pieces if they didn't get out before the steel door crashed open. “A whole bunch of us went over the side,” Staymates said during a recent interview at his Hagerstown home. “That saved my life.” Weighed down by ammunition, weapons and supplies, the men plunged into about 8 feet of salt water, hitting the bottom of the English Channel.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | May 28, 2000
HALFWAY - World War II veterans Jack Shriver and Richard Flook remember the waves lapping over barbed wire booby traps. cont. from front page They remember holding their rifles high while wading through cold water to reach Omaha beach in Normandy soon after their fellow American soldiers stormed the shore on D-Day. They remember the floating bodies and the mine-filled marshes - even if they don't want to. "I don't like to think much about the war," said Shriver, 77. "I've got better things to dream about.
OPINION
July 13, 2011
Passing of Funkstown man marks end of an era To the editor: In late January and early February 1941, young men from Washington County and Hagerstown gathered at the armory on North Potomac Street. They were preparing for “M” or Mobilization Day. Company B, 115th Infantry Regiment, 29th Division was entering federal service for one year. At the end of 1941, the unit was en route home from the Carolina maneuvers. During a rest stop, the men heard the news of Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
March 12, 2009
APRIL 5, 1922-MARCH 10, 2009 Wade A. Lum, 86, of Hagerstown, Md., entered into eternal rest on March 10, 2009, at the Washington County Hospital. Born April 5, 1922, he was the son of the late Hoye A. Lum and Louise (Pittenger) Lum. He attended Washington County Schools, and was employed at Fairchild Aircraft Corporation for 33 years, retiring in 1984. He served with the 35th Signal Construction Battalion, which was detached to the invasion at Omaha Beach, Normandy, France during World War II. Wade was a lifelong member of the Grace United Methodist Church in Hagerstown, where he served as an usher, a member of the Trustee Board, and a teacher in the Junior High Department of the Sunday School.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | November 10, 2000
WWII veteran returns to Normandy A sentimental visit to Normandy, France, prompted Hagerstown native Jack Stoeber to dig out the yellowed newspaper articles and the black and white photographs he "never talked about. " The World War II veteran confronted the faded pictures of Nazi generals, prisoners of war, U.S. Army comrades and himself as a uniformed 19-year-old for the first time in more than 50 years in September as he prepared to embark on the return trip to Normandy.
NEWS
June 5, 2009
LA CAMBE, France (AP) -- Americans and Germans who were bitter enemies during the D-Day invasion of France shared stories and moments of silence at a Normandy ceremony Friday, joining together to honor those who perished in the epochal World War II beach landings. They held their poignant, low-key ceremony at the German cemetery at La Cambe a day before an international commemoration nearby, led by President Barack Obama, to mark 65 years since Allied forces landed on Normandy's shores.
NEWS
By TARA REILLY | May 30, 2004
SHARPSBURG As a festive parade with marching bands, Uncle Sam and blaring fire trucks reached its end in Sharpsburg on Saturday, a more solemn ceremony followed nearby at Antietam National Cemetery. Officials representing military groups, the town of Sharpsburg and others gathered at the cemetery to honor the country's past and present servicemen and women, and in particular, World War II veterans. The event was part of Sharpsburg's 137th Memorial Day Commemoration. About six WWII veterans were among those who attended the ceremony.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | June 5, 2009
FUNKSTOWN -- Shortly after midnight on June 6, 1944, an armada carrying 150,000 American, British and Canadian troops departed from ports in southern England for the coast of Nazi-occupied France. Among the members of the Allied invasion force was Hagerstown resident Kenneth Jones, a 20-year-old Army corporal who had joined the 29th Infantry Division shortly after the United States entered World War II. The 29th was a patchwork of men from the mid-Atlantic region, including about 40 from the Hagerstown area.
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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | June 5, 2012
German machine-gun fire hammered on the door of Arthur Staymates' landing craft as it approached Omaha Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944. Now a gray-haired octogenarian, Staymates said that the American soldiers believed they would be cut to pieces if they didn't get out before the steel door crashed open. “A whole bunch of us went over the side,” Staymates said during a recent interview at his Hagerstown home. “That saved my life.” Weighed down by ammunition, weapons and supplies, the men plunged into about 8 feet of salt water, hitting the bottom of the English Channel.
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OBITUARIES
January 6, 2012
George Robert Lott, 86, of Hagerstown, Md., and formerly of Long Island, N.Y., died Saturday, Dec. 24, 2011. He was the loving husband of Lois; loving father of Stephanie Prianti (Richard), Amanda Shenstone (Mark), and predeceased by son, James; loving grandfather of Jaime, Leah, Esperanza, and predeceased by granddaughter, Laurel; loving great-grandfather of Chloe; uncle to many nieces and nephews; and predeceased by sister, Alice, and brothers, James and Charles. He was a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, serving on D-Day, first wave at Normandy, Omaha Beach, on June 6, 1944, and D-Day, Iwo Jima, in February 1945.
OPINION
July 13, 2011
Passing of Funkstown man marks end of an era To the editor: In late January and early February 1941, young men from Washington County and Hagerstown gathered at the armory on North Potomac Street. They were preparing for “M” or Mobilization Day. Company B, 115th Infantry Regiment, 29th Division was entering federal service for one year. At the end of 1941, the unit was en route home from the Carolina maneuvers. During a rest stop, the men heard the news of Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | June 5, 2011
Omaha Beach was stained red with blood when the steel door of 19-year-old Robert Blair's landing craft crashed open on June 7, 1944. A day earlier, on D-Day, thousands of American GIs landed there to begin the Allied invasion of western Europe. The bodies of dead Americans and Germans remained on the beach. "I remember that day really well," Blair said recently at his Paramount home. "When we got there, I saw nothing but blood. It was one of the most horrible days of my life.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | June 5, 2009
FUNKSTOWN -- Shortly after midnight on June 6, 1944, an armada carrying 150,000 American, British and Canadian troops departed from ports in southern England for the coast of Nazi-occupied France. Among the members of the Allied invasion force was Hagerstown resident Kenneth Jones, a 20-year-old Army corporal who had joined the 29th Infantry Division shortly after the United States entered World War II. The 29th was a patchwork of men from the mid-Atlantic region, including about 40 from the Hagerstown area.
NEWS
June 5, 2009
LA CAMBE, France (AP) -- Americans and Germans who were bitter enemies during the D-Day invasion of France shared stories and moments of silence at a Normandy ceremony Friday, joining together to honor those who perished in the epochal World War II beach landings. They held their poignant, low-key ceremony at the German cemetery at La Cambe a day before an international commemoration nearby, led by President Barack Obama, to mark 65 years since Allied forces landed on Normandy's shores.
NEWS
March 13, 2009
APRIL 5, 1922-MARCH 10, 2009 Wade A. Lum, 86, of Hagerstown, Md., entered into eternal rest on March 10, 2009, at the Washington County Hospital. Born April 5, 1922, he was the son of the late Hoye A. Lum and Louise (Pittenger) Lum. He attended Washington County Schools, and was employed at Fairchild Aircraft Corporation for 43 years, retiring in 1984. He served with the 35th Signal Construction Battalion, which was detached to the invasion at Omaha Beach, Normandy, France during World War II. Wade was a lifelong member of the Grace United Methodist Church in Hagerstown, where he served as an usher, a member of the Trustee Board and a teacher in the Junior High Department of the Sunday School.
NEWS
by BOB MAGINNIS | June 6, 2007
Odds and ends from a columnist's notebook: · On the anniversary of D-Day, it is appropriate to think of those Americans who participated in the great effort to liberate Europe. They include the men of Hagers-town's Company B, commanded by Capt. Leroy "Bud" Weddle, who nearly lost an arm to German fire. In 1982, Weddle described the experience to a Herald-Mail reporter. He said he arrived on Omaha Beach in Normandy, France in command of 250 soldiers. Ten months later, 169 of those men were dead.
NEWS
by DON AINES | May 27, 2006
SCOTLAND, Pa. - Dolores Flood can keep a secret. As a member of the U.S. Navy WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service) during World War II, she was involved in breaking enemy codes. "We helped shorten the war by what we did," the 85-year-old Chambersburg, Pa., resident said Friday at an event honoring World War II veterans at the Scotland School for Veterans Children. WAVES helped build and operate the machines used to decipher Japanese and German military codes, she said.
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