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by TAMELA BAKER | September 21, 2005
WASHINGTON tammyb@herald-mail.com As promised last month, the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs will conduct a hearing Thursday on the policy for interment in national cemeteries. The hearing comes as a result of protests over the inurnment this summer at Arlington National Cemetery of the remains of a man convicted in the 1994 murders of a Hagerstown couple. The couple's son, Vernon Davis of Hagerstown, is scheduled to testify at the hearing. It begins at 10 a.m. Thursday in Room 418 in the Russell Senate Office Building.
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NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | December 29, 2006
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said Thursday that Sino Swearingen Aircraft Corporation is about a year away from receiving the regulatory agency's overall full production certification for a business jet that partially is manufactured in Berkeley County. "The FAA has approved the production inspection system (known as APIS) for the SJ30 model, which is the first step towards full production approval, which is about a year away," said Roland Herwig, an FAA spokesman for the agency's Southwest Region office in Oklahoma City.
NEWS
March 30, 2001
Thumbs up, thumbs down 4/1 To Dorothy Truax, a 79-year-old Big Pool resident who taught school for 37 years and now volunteers 15 to 20 hours a week at Clear Spring Elementary School. Devotion like this is rare indeed. To Bob Fleenor, the Herald-Mail copy editor whose encyclopedic grasp of a ton of facts about a host of subjects, including history, geography and literature has won him thousands of dollars on Jeopardy, the popular TV game show. We're impressed.
NEWS
July 25, 1997
By MARLO BARNHART Staff Writer The huge bronze and granite monument at Cedar Lawn Memorial Park is for departed heroes, but the dedication service Friday was for the living. The monument is seven feet tall and six feet wide made of dark red carnelian granite from Minnesota. The huge 3 by 5 foot bronze relief plaque portrays firefighters, police officers and ambulance personnel performing their duties. "The sacrifices are often forgotten," said Hagerstown Fire Chief Gary Hawbaker.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | April 21, 1998
The Salvation Army has been a part of the lives of Robert and Georgia Henderson from the time they were children. Their parents ran Salvation Army facilities throughout the country, and the two grew up seeing how the organization works from the inside. Maj. Robert Henderson remembers his father's stints in New York City and Atlanta. His wife, Georgia Henderson, grew up in cities throughout the Southwest, including Oklahoma and Mexico City. "I can't hardly call one city my hometown," said Robert Henderson, who with his wife took over the The Hagerstown Corps of the Salvation Army last June.
NEWS
by DON AINES | July 7, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com Fighting terrorism has been the focus of homeland security efforts since the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, but federal funding now finding its way to counties also will help train and equip emergency personnel for more common natural and manmade disasters that can produce similar disruptions, according to Franklin County Emergency Services Director Jerry Flasher. Franklin County last month received $43,206 in grants for three emergency response programs, with $36,415 earmarked for an update of its emergency operations plan, according to the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency (PEMA)
NEWS
by ERIN JULIUS | November 23, 2006
Clyde and Claudine Miller left Oklahoma City on Monday morning, driving more than 550 miles a day to reach a family Thanksgiving celebration in Reading, Pa., by Wednesday night. Early Wednesday afternoon, the couple stopped at the Pennsylvania Welcome Center off Interstate 81 near Greencastle, Pa. Traffic was good during their trip, and they didn't have to pay more than $2.11 for a gallon of gas, Clyde Miller said. The Millers were two of about 540 guests who stopped at the welcome center Wednesday from 7 a.m. to noon, said Carrie Burdge, a center supervisor.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | October 30, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Out of 350,000 people serving in the National Guard, Spc. Erik Nowak was the best. He's hauled 35 pounds of equipment on his back over 10 miles of road and was loaded down with 70 pounds of gear on another nearly six-mile hike. The Bunker Hill, W.Va., man also had to excel in combat water survival, weapons training and complete tasks with minimal sleep. Nowak, 27, competed in a nationwide National Guard competition earlier this year and his proficiency was enough to get him selected as the 2007 U.S. Army National Guard Soldier of the Year.
NEWS
June 10, 2009
MAY 26, 1929-JUNE 8, 2009 FREDERICK, Md. -- Mrs. Ruby Anne Zimmerman Baker, 80, of Frederick, died Monday, June 8, 2009, at Meadows Dialysis Center in Hagerstown. She was the wife of the late Russell Linwood Baker, who died in September 1995. Mrs. Baker was born in Frederick on May 26, 1929, a daughter of the late John Melvin and Grace Grove Zimmerman. She was a graduate of Frederick High School, class of 1947, and for many years worked in the office of Sagner's in Frederick.
NEWS
By KRISTIN WILSON | January 8, 2006
kristinw@herald-mail.com More than anything, acoustic guitarist Edgar Cruz wants audiences to enjoy his music. With that goal in mind he's developed a niche - taking music that people like and finding a way to play it on the guitar. His quest to entertain audiences with his one-man acoustic guitar show has led him to transpose hundreds of popular songs not typically heard on a lone guitar. Perhaps his most noteworthy feat is performing Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" on his six guitar strings.
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