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NEWS
January 22, 2001
Hospice coordinator hopes to tear down barriers By ANDREA BROWN-HURLEY / Staff Writer photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer Dawn Johns hopes to make a difference in the community by spreading the word about Hospice of Washington County. continued The new community liaison coordinator for Hagerstown-based Hospice said she will serve as an advocate for Hospice and for the organization's patients and their families. Johns said she will strive to "take down the barriers" that prevent terminally ill Washington County residents from living the remainder of their lives in the comfort of professional Hospice care.
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NEWS
BY ANDREA ROWLAND | April 2, 2002
andreabh@herald-mail.com BOONSBORO - The new executive director of Reeder's Memorial Home in Boonsboro recently crossed one item off her lengthy to-do list: Meet every resident at the 157-bed facility to see how Reeder's can better meet their needs. Sheila A. Griffith said the residents make the demanding job of overseeing every aspect of the facility worthwhile. "Working with the residents and with people who really like working here is very rewarding," said Griffith, 35. "If you want to make a difference in somebody's life very quickly and easily, walk into a nursing home and smile at somebody.
NEWS
By DON AINES | May 4, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - The flood of births in the years after World War II, aka the baby boom, will become a flood of senior citizens in the years ahead, taxing a health-care system that already is short of medical professionals. Pennsylvania has one of the oldest populations in the United States - the median age of 39.3 years ranks fifth, according to StateMaster.com - and the older it gets, the more nursing care the population will require. The shortage of licensed practical nurses will be an estimated 4,000 in less than two years, said Annette Sanders, president of the Institute for Caregiver Education.
NEWS
BY STACEY DANZUSO | April 12, 2002
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Menno Haven Inc. will nearly double the size of its Menno Village campus by adding 65 acres and 115 independent living villas and an apartment building for seniors. Menno Haven, which operates the Menno Village continuing care retirement community on Scotland Avenue and Penn Hall on Philadelphia Avenue, will break ground on the first phase of 28 villas later this month, said Carol Fries, vice president of marketing and public relations.
NEWS
By DON AINES | May 15, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- During his time on the stand Wednesday in Franklin County Court, Willie H. Brown testified that he never had been arrested in his life, a statement Public Defender Michael Toms offered him the chance to correct. "Yes, sir," Brown said when asked if it was accurate. "What about that arrest for criminal homicide in Florida?" asked Assistant District Attorney Lauren Sulcove on cross-examination. Brown, on trial for charges that he sexually molested several girls at his Hackberry Drive home in Chambersburg, denied he had been arrested and testified that the 1994 killing was "self-defense.
NEWS
By DON AINES | May 3, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. -- The flood of births in the years after World War II, aka the baby boom, will become a flood of senior citizens in the years ahead, taxing a health-care system that already is short of medical professionals. Pennsylvania has one of the oldest populations in the United States -- the median age of 39.3 years ranks fifth, according to StateMaster.com -- and the older it gets, the more nursing care the population will require. The shortage of licensed practical nurses will be an estimated 4,000 in less than two years, said Annette Sanders, president of the Institute for Caregiver Education.
NEWS
June 21, 1999
By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Sometimes John Hashempour wonders if he did the right thing when he bought the run-down Leland Hotel building in Waynesboro two years ago. "I must have been out of my head," he said Monday as work was nearing completion to turn the century-old, four-story landmark on the corner of Main Street and Cleveland...
NEWS
December 16, 2000
Choosing home with care By ANDREW SCHOTZ / Staff Writer Ed Wines' nose told him he made a good choice of long-term care for his mother. As he walked through the halls of the nursing home at Ravenwood Lutheran Village in Hagerstown, he was impressed because something was missing. "There is no odor of a nursing home," Wines, of Boonsboro, recalled thinking to himself. Family members and friends planning to move one of their own into a nursing home or an assisted living center have many things to consider.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | August 29, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com Discussing the need for long-term residential care with aging loved ones isn't an easy conversation, but it's one that many families will face as parents and other close relatives approach the point when they can no longer care for themselves in their own homes. The best time to address the issue is before crisis strikes, when elderly loved ones can make their own decisions about dependent care, experts say. "There is no substitute for frank but loving discussions in a family - ahead of time," says Kathryn McGrew, associate professor of sociology and gerontology, and a Scripps Gerontology Center fellow, at Miami University in Ohio.
NEWS
July 19, 1998
photo: KEVIN G. GILBERT / staff photographer enlarge By LAURA ERNDE / Staff Writer Growing up on Tri-State area farms, Louise Statler, Mary Arnold and Martha Leatherman thought they knew the meaning of hard work and strict living. Then, in 1945, the three joined the Cadet Nurses Corps at Washington County Hospital. The standards were high and the work wore down their leather nursing heels. About half of their class dropped out before graduation.
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