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NEWS
October 29, 2002
The Mirror of Truth, a group opposed to war with Iraq, will hold a forum on Wednesday at Hagerstown Community College in the Kepler Theater from 7 to 10 p.m. Organizer Shahab Z. Siddiqui said while the development of chemical, biological or nuclear weapons can not be ignored, a unilateral war with Iraq is not the answer. Instead, the group endorses United Nations action to force unrestricted weapons inspections in Iraq, Siddiqui said. The meeting is open to the public.
NEWS
April 17, 2010
The question posted Wednesday on The Herald-Mail's Web site was: Should the United States take a tougher stance with Iran as that country moves closer to having nuclear weapons? Poll results: Yes: 655 votes (88 percent) No: 91 votes (12 percent) o"Many experts believe Iran has passed the breakout point to create the bomb. Israel acutely understands this threat because a regime that illicitly seeks nuclear weapons and openly calls for Israel's destruction is supporting terror proxies that continuously attack Israel's civilians with missiles, rockets and other means.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 28, 2005
tarar@herald-mail.com Senior-level North Korea government officials told members of Congress who visited Pyongyang earlier this month that North Korea would give up its nuclear weapons and treat the U.S. as a friend in return for three assurances from the country, U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett said Thursday. North Korea wants the United States to guarantee it will not pre-emptively strike the country, will not force a regime change and will stop referring to North Korea as an "Axis of Evil" nation, Bartlett, R-Md.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama said Tuesday that a nuclear-armed North Korea poses a "grave threat" to the world, and he vowed to end a cycle of allowing Pyongyang to create crises and then be rewarded with incentives to back down. "This is a pattern they've come to expect," Obama said. "We are going to break that pattern. " Standing alongside South Korean President Lee Myung-bak in the White House Rose Garden, Obama said they agreed that a new U.N. resolution seeking to halt North Korea's development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles must be fully enforced.
NEWS
February 10, 1998
The decision to send a Martinsburg-based unit of the West Virginia Air National Guard back to the Persian Gulf seven years after its members helped defeat Saddam Hussein should convince citizens of two things. The first is that the conflict is now at a serious point; the second is that the U.S. failure to oust the Iraqi dictator in 1991 was a mistake. The Berkeley County unit is being sent to the Middle East because Iraq has been playing a game of cat-and-mouse with United Nations inspectors that it agreed could certify that it was not producing chemical or nuclear weapons.
NEWS
October 1, 2009
U.S. firms must stop doing business with Iran To the editor: Iran's illicit nuclear weapons program presents a grave threat to the United States, our allies and to global stability. Already weakened by U.S. and European Union sanctions, the combined effects of the financial crisis and lower oil prices will help debilitate Iran's quest for a nuclear weapon. One organization, United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI), has recently launched the Iran Business Registry (unitedagainstnucleariran.
NEWS
By SHOVAL RESNICK | September 11, 2007
Rant Today, on Sept. 11, many Americans will be thinking not just about the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, but also about the War in Iraq. Which brings to mind a question: Why? Why have these things become so connected in the minds of American citizens? Could this be the reason that nearly six years after the 9/11 attacks, Americans as a whole are unable to move past the tragedy? The events of Sept. 11, 2001, terrified and outraged us, and rightly so. Almost 3,000 Americans died in the attacks.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | December 19, 2011
Area residents had mixed reactions Monday to the news that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il had died of a heart attack at age 69. Ronald Mickelinc of Martinsburg, W.Va., said Kim's death works out much better for the people of North Korea. “(Kim) was a mass murderer and he was crazy,” Mickelinc said. “Maybe they won't be selling nuclear weapons to other countries, and maybe they'll start feeding their people.” Ty Jaouni of Hagerstown said that although things might change, North Korea could remain a problem.
NEWS
December 1, 2007
To the editor: Robert Gary's column of Oct. 21, "Getting it right this time around," puts forth a proposal to prevent Iran from building an atomic bomb through the use of what he calls "Focused Industrial Disablement" - the bombing of infrastructure needed to support the bomb-making process, such as power and water supplies. He makes this all sound very reasonable and sanitary and declares it to be humane, necessary and proper. However, one must buy into some very troubling assumptions to accept Gary's plan.
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NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | December 19, 2011
Area residents had mixed reactions Monday to the news that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il had died of a heart attack at age 69. Ronald Mickelinc of Martinsburg, W.Va., said Kim's death works out much better for the people of North Korea. “(Kim) was a mass murderer and he was crazy,” Mickelinc said. “Maybe they won't be selling nuclear weapons to other countries, and maybe they'll start feeding their people.” Ty Jaouni of Hagerstown said that although things might change, North Korea could remain a problem.
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NEWS
April 17, 2010
The question posted Wednesday on The Herald-Mail's Web site was: Should the United States take a tougher stance with Iran as that country moves closer to having nuclear weapons? Poll results: Yes: 655 votes (88 percent) No: 91 votes (12 percent) o"Many experts believe Iran has passed the breakout point to create the bomb. Israel acutely understands this threat because a regime that illicitly seeks nuclear weapons and openly calls for Israel's destruction is supporting terror proxies that continuously attack Israel's civilians with missiles, rockets and other means.
NEWS
October 1, 2009
U.S. firms must stop doing business with Iran To the editor: Iran's illicit nuclear weapons program presents a grave threat to the United States, our allies and to global stability. Already weakened by U.S. and European Union sanctions, the combined effects of the financial crisis and lower oil prices will help debilitate Iran's quest for a nuclear weapon. One organization, United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI), has recently launched the Iran Business Registry (unitedagainstnucleariran.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama said Tuesday that a nuclear-armed North Korea poses a "grave threat" to the world, and he vowed to end a cycle of allowing Pyongyang to create crises and then be rewarded with incentives to back down. "This is a pattern they've come to expect," Obama said. "We are going to break that pattern. " Standing alongside South Korean President Lee Myung-bak in the White House Rose Garden, Obama said they agreed that a new U.N. resolution seeking to halt North Korea's development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles must be fully enforced.
NEWS
December 1, 2007
To the editor: Robert Gary's column of Oct. 21, "Getting it right this time around," puts forth a proposal to prevent Iran from building an atomic bomb through the use of what he calls "Focused Industrial Disablement" - the bombing of infrastructure needed to support the bomb-making process, such as power and water supplies. He makes this all sound very reasonable and sanitary and declares it to be humane, necessary and proper. However, one must buy into some very troubling assumptions to accept Gary's plan.
NEWS
By SHOVAL RESNICK | September 11, 2007
Rant Today, on Sept. 11, many Americans will be thinking not just about the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, but also about the War in Iraq. Which brings to mind a question: Why? Why have these things become so connected in the minds of American citizens? Could this be the reason that nearly six years after the 9/11 attacks, Americans as a whole are unable to move past the tragedy? The events of Sept. 11, 2001, terrified and outraged us, and rightly so. Almost 3,000 Americans died in the attacks.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | January 28, 2005
tarar@herald-mail.com Senior-level North Korea government officials told members of Congress who visited Pyongyang earlier this month that North Korea would give up its nuclear weapons and treat the U.S. as a friend in return for three assurances from the country, U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett said Thursday. North Korea wants the United States to guarantee it will not pre-emptively strike the country, will not force a regime change and will stop referring to North Korea as an "Axis of Evil" nation, Bartlett, R-Md.
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