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Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact

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NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | March 30, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - Considered a dead issue in the Maryland General Assembly less than a week ago, legislation for milk price supports for Maryland dairy farmers has been given new life in the General Assembly. A vote on the legislation that would allow Maryland to join a compact of dairy-producing states could come today in the House of Delegates. "We're feeling really good about it," said Del. J. Anita Stup, R-Frederick/Washington. The bill likely would face an uphill climb in the Senate, where the Economic and Environmental Matters Committee voted 8-3 early this month to reject another version of the legislation, labeled "a milk tax" in a fierce lobbying campaign waged by grocery retailers and other opponents.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
Last month's vote by a Maryland state senate committee to kill a bill to create a milk-price support program for the state's dairy industry was no surprise, given the lobbying campaign by the big grocery chains which successfully tagged the bill as a "milk tax. " But when the dust settled, state agriculture officials decided that doing nothing for Maryland's dairy industry, which has lost 25 percent of its farms since 1991, was unacceptable. We agree. It's time for a full-court press on this legislation.
NEWS
December 3, 1999
It's too bad that Maryland's dairy farmers can't turn all the hot air being expended discussing their problems into something useful. The federal lawmakers who profess to love the family farmer and hate sprawl could make progress on both issues, if they got serious about this. Unfortunately, at the Congressional level, there's been more yakety-yak than action on the matter. Though the state lost 17 of its 845 remaining dairy farms last year, next month the price of milk is set to drop by $2.50 per hundred-weight, because Congress won't give Maryland permission to join the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | January 27, 2000
Maryland dairy farmers say falling milk prices, caused in part by a glut in the market, and the inability to join a multistate commerce pact pose a potentially serious threat to their future. cont. from front page In Washington County, the number of dairy farms has dropped from 200 five years ago to around 160, according to Don Schwartz, a Maryland Cooperative Extension agent in the county. Other farmers can't predict how long they will last. David Herbst, a second-generation dairy farmer who runs Misty Meadow Farms in Ringgold, said it hurt his business when the basic price for 100 pounds of milk - about 11.6 gallons - as set by a federal formula, dipped from more than $16 to under $10 in just a few months.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | March 4, 1998
Farmers say milk pact vital ANNAPOLIS - Dairy farmers and grocery retailers squared off Tuesday over legislation in the Maryland General Assembly that would allow the state to join a compact of milk-producing states. Farmers and their supporters told the Senate Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee that the bill is needed as a means of setting price controls and returning stability to a business that has been facing hard economic times. "There are a lot of people who are already out of the dairy industry or threatening to get out if we don't help them out," said Sen. John W. Derr, R-Frederick/Washington, one of the legislation's sponsors.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | April 3, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - Supporters of legislation that would set milk price supports in Maryland said Thursday momentum is building for the bill - once considered dead - to be approved in the state Senate. "I just know there's a good chance," said Sen. John W. Derr, R-Frederick/Washington. Derr and other supporters of the legislation had their hopes buoyed Wednesday when Gov. Parris N. Glendening personally visited key senators in an effort to get the bill passed. Since then they believe they have been picking up crucial votes for the legislation.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | April 7, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - A Maryland Senate panel reversed itself Tuesday and gave its approval to legislation that would allow state dairy farmers to join with other states in a milk price-setting compact. The Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 7-4 to give the legislation a favorable report - reversing the panel's 3-8 vote on a similar bill last month. The vote sets the stage for what could be a raucous debate on the Senate floor. "Now we've got our work cut out for us," said Sen. John W. Derr, R-Frederick/Washington.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | March 31, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - Dairy farmers won a significant victory Tuesday in the Maryland House of Delegates, where lawmakers voted to approve legislation that would set milk price supports in the state. But the bill, which would allow Maryland to join a compact of dairy-producing states, faces an uphill struggle in the Senate, which already has rejected similar milk legislation. The House approved the legislation by a 82-53 vote after an hour-long debate. Rural lawmakers argued that the bill was a way to help a troubled industry.
NEWS
By DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | December 2, 1999
Money will be tight for many Maryland dairy farmers and some will go out of business in the coming months when milk prices drop below the average cost of production, the head of Maryland's Dairy Industry Association said Thursday. cont. from front page The future would be brighter if Congress had allowed Maryland dairy farmers to join the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact, said association President Myron Wilhide, who was in Hagerstown Thursday for the association's third annual meeting.
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NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | January 27, 2000
Maryland dairy farmers say falling milk prices, caused in part by a glut in the market, and the inability to join a multistate commerce pact pose a potentially serious threat to their future. cont. from front page In Washington County, the number of dairy farms has dropped from 200 five years ago to around 160, according to Don Schwartz, a Maryland Cooperative Extension agent in the county. Other farmers can't predict how long they will last. David Herbst, a second-generation dairy farmer who runs Misty Meadow Farms in Ringgold, said it hurt his business when the basic price for 100 pounds of milk - about 11.6 gallons - as set by a federal formula, dipped from more than $16 to under $10 in just a few months.
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NEWS
December 3, 1999
It's too bad that Maryland's dairy farmers can't turn all the hot air being expended discussing their problems into something useful. The federal lawmakers who profess to love the family farmer and hate sprawl could make progress on both issues, if they got serious about this. Unfortunately, at the Congressional level, there's been more yakety-yak than action on the matter. Though the state lost 17 of its 845 remaining dairy farms last year, next month the price of milk is set to drop by $2.50 per hundred-weight, because Congress won't give Maryland permission to join the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact.
NEWS
By DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | December 2, 1999
Money will be tight for many Maryland dairy farmers and some will go out of business in the coming months when milk prices drop below the average cost of production, the head of Maryland's Dairy Industry Association said Thursday. cont. from front page The future would be brighter if Congress had allowed Maryland dairy farmers to join the Northeast Interstate Dairy Compact, said association President Myron Wilhide, who was in Hagerstown Thursday for the association's third annual meeting.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | April 7, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - A Maryland Senate panel reversed itself Tuesday and gave its approval to legislation that would allow state dairy farmers to join with other states in a milk price-setting compact. The Economic and Environmental Affairs Committee voted 7-4 to give the legislation a favorable report - reversing the panel's 3-8 vote on a similar bill last month. The vote sets the stage for what could be a raucous debate on the Senate floor. "Now we've got our work cut out for us," said Sen. John W. Derr, R-Frederick/Washington.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | April 3, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - Supporters of legislation that would set milk price supports in Maryland said Thursday momentum is building for the bill - once considered dead - to be approved in the state Senate. "I just know there's a good chance," said Sen. John W. Derr, R-Frederick/Washington. Derr and other supporters of the legislation had their hopes buoyed Wednesday when Gov. Parris N. Glendening personally visited key senators in an effort to get the bill passed. Since then they believe they have been picking up crucial votes for the legislation.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | April 2, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening on Wednesday took the unusual step of talking personally to members of the state Senate about his support for legislation aimed at helping the state's ailing dairy industry. The face-to-face lobbying sessions came a day after the House of Delegates narrowly voted to pass a bill that would allow the state to join with other milk-producing states in a pricing compact. The legislation was expected to have a tough time in the Senate because one of its committees already has defeated a version of the legislation.
NEWS
April 2, 1998
Last month's vote by a Maryland state senate committee to kill a bill to create a milk-price support program for the state's dairy industry was no surprise, given the lobbying campaign by the big grocery chains which successfully tagged the bill as a "milk tax. " But when the dust settled, state agriculture officials decided that doing nothing for Maryland's dairy industry, which has lost 25 percent of its farms since 1991, was unacceptable. We agree. It's time for a full-court press on this legislation.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | March 31, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - Dairy farmers won a significant victory Tuesday in the Maryland House of Delegates, where lawmakers voted to approve legislation that would set milk price supports in the state. But the bill, which would allow Maryland to join a compact of dairy-producing states, faces an uphill struggle in the Senate, which already has rejected similar milk legislation. The House approved the legislation by a 82-53 vote after an hour-long debate. Rural lawmakers argued that the bill was a way to help a troubled industry.
NEWS
By GUY FLETCHER | March 30, 1998
ANNAPOLIS - Considered a dead issue in the Maryland General Assembly less than a week ago, legislation for milk price supports for Maryland dairy farmers has been given new life in the General Assembly. A vote on the legislation that would allow Maryland to join a compact of dairy-producing states could come today in the House of Delegates. "We're feeling really good about it," said Del. J. Anita Stup, R-Frederick/Washington. The bill likely would face an uphill climb in the Senate, where the Economic and Environmental Matters Committee voted 8-3 early this month to reject another version of the legislation, labeled "a milk tax" in a fierce lobbying campaign waged by grocery retailers and other opponents.
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