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by DAVE McMILLION | March 6, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com North Korea, which this week threatened that armed confrontation could be imminent on the Korean Peninsula, could make five nuclear bombs in about six months, an expert on Korea said at Shepherd College Wednesday night. "It is a dangerous situation we cannot ignore," Hang Yul Rhee told students during a speech in the Cumberland Room of Shepherd's College Center. North Korea officials issued the nuclear war threat after North Korean fighter jets intercepted a U.S. reconnaissance plane over the Sea of Japan on Sunday.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama said Tuesday that a nuclear-armed North Korea poses a "grave threat" to the world, and he vowed to end a cycle of allowing Pyongyang to create crises and then be rewarded with incentives to back down. "This is a pattern they've come to expect," Obama said. "We are going to break that pattern. " Standing alongside South Korean President Lee Myung-bak in the White House Rose Garden, Obama said they agreed that a new U.N. resolution seeking to halt North Korea's development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles must be fully enforced.
NEWS
May 29, 2009
Good students, good citizens To the editor: On May 21, I attended an awards program sponsored by the Washington County Association of Elementary School Administrators. Sitting on the stage of South Hagerstown High School were 76 of the finest and proudest fifth-grade students in the county. They were being awarded the Principal's Citizenship Awards. The selection criteria is based on their demonstration of "1) Pride and respect toward students and adults; 2)
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | December 19, 2011
Area residents had mixed reactions Monday to the news that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il had died of a heart attack at age 69. Ronald Mickelinc of Martinsburg, W.Va., said Kim's death works out much better for the people of North Korea. “(Kim) was a mass murderer and he was crazy,” Mickelinc said. “Maybe they won't be selling nuclear weapons to other countries, and maybe they'll start feeding their people.” Ty Jaouni of Hagerstown said that although things might change, North Korea could remain a problem.
NEWS
by ANDREW SCHOTZ | January 6, 2003
andrews@herald-mail.com TRI-STATE - Sixteen months after four U.S. jets were hijacked and crashed, terrorism continues to be the leading global fear for a pool of Tri-State residents surveyed Saturday. Close behind were North Korea's nuclear threat and the possibility of a United States attack on Iraq. Some respondents wouldn't label one fear as the greatest. About 30 people were asked which situation worries them the most. Eight named terrorism, four named North Korea and three named Iraq.
NEWS
by LINDA DUFFIELD | October 1, 2006
Commentary Here were some of the news stories that came across The Associated Press wire in roughly a six-hour period on Tuesday. · UNITED NATIONS - North Korea blames U.S. for breakdown in nuclear talks and shuns further negotiations. · MANCHESTER, England - British Prime Minister Tony Blair says it is sometimes hard to be the United States' strongest ally. · MOSCOW - Reports: Russia to ship fuel for Iranian nuclear plant by March. · LASHKAR GAH, Afghanistan - Suicide bombing outside governor's compound in southern Afghanistan kills 18. · WASHINGTON - President Bush said it is naive and a mistake to think that the war with Iraq has worsened terrorism, as a key portion of a national intelligence assessment by his own administration suggests.
NEWS
April 13, 2010
The question posted Friday on The Herald-Mail's Web site was: Do you think the nuclear arms pact between the U.S. and Russia signed Thursday is a first step toward making the world a safer place? Poll results: Yes: 218 votes (25 percent) No: 657 votes (75 percent) o "That's great. The U.S. and Russia will not have nukes. That makes me feel safe. Of course, it's been something like 50 years since the last time either of us used a nuke so that it hardly matters.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | April 15, 2013
U.S. Rep. John Delaney said he wants to work toward leveling the playing field to ensure all Americans have an equal opportunity to succeed. Delaney talked about equality, the economy, tensions with North Korea and several other issues Monday during the Friends of Scouting 2013 Community Campaign Breakfast at the Academy Theater in downtown Hagerstown. “The only way to preserve (equality) is to make sure there is an environment where people have opportunities,” the Democratic freshman congressman representing Maryland's 6th District said.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 9, 2013
The president of South Korea thanked a group of local Korean War veterans for helping set the cornerstone of a 60-year partnership between her country and the United States during a dinner Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Les Bishop, commander of Antietam Chapter 312 of the Korean War Veterans Association, said 27 members of the organization were among about 500 people who were invited to attend the event with South Korean President Park Geun-hye at...
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | July 16, 2013
Lee Blevins held a letter Monday that had remained sealed since his mother wrote it 63 years ago. The intended recipient was his brother, Heren, who was captured in 1950 while serving in the U.S. Army during the first year of the Korean War. Blevins said he had no idea what the letter would say as he opened the envelope, marked on the outside with a raspberry colored return-to-sender stamp that read, “Verified Missing in Action.” ...
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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | July 16, 2013
Lee Blevins held a letter Monday that had remained sealed since his mother wrote it 63 years ago. The intended recipient was his brother, Heren, who was captured in 1950 while serving in the U.S. Army during the first year of the Korean War. Blevins said he had no idea what the letter would say as he opened the envelope, marked on the outside with a raspberry colored return-to-sender stamp that read, “Verified Missing in Action.” ...
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NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 26, 2013
Jesse Englehart was one of thousands of Marines who were pulling back from the Chosin Reservoir when he and a friend saw a clean poncho that looked peculiar lying on the frozen ground. He said the two walked toward the poncho and lifted it. “There was a Chinese soldier with a rifle,” the 81-year-old Englehart said recently from his Washington County home. “I'm not sure if I shot him or my buddy shot him. It's better if it's blocked out of your mind, I think.” He said his service during the Korean War was the first leg of a 22-year-career in the Marine Corps that led to two tours of duty in Vietnam and a post as security chief at Camp David.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 25, 2013
In 1953, the Korean War had been raging for three years when thousands of North Korean prisoners of war were set free below the 38th Parallel at Pusan. Hagerstown resident Ed Peters, 81, said he was a military policeman serving in Korea at the time as he watched the enemy soldiers mix with the local population. “They brought hundreds of (boats) into Pusan and released those guys in the streets,” Peters said. “Letting those prisoners go free in Pusan created some headaches for the local police ... They were running around and no one knew who was who.” According to documents from the time, the prisoners were released in June 1953 because many of them said they were anti-Communist and wouldn't return to fight for North Korea.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 9, 2013
The president of South Korea thanked a group of local Korean War veterans for helping set the cornerstone of a 60-year partnership between her country and the United States during a dinner Tuesday in Washington, D.C. Les Bishop, commander of Antietam Chapter 312 of the Korean War Veterans Association, said 27 members of the organization were among about 500 people who were invited to attend the event with South Korean President Park Geun-hye at...
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | April 15, 2013
U.S. Rep. John Delaney said he wants to work toward leveling the playing field to ensure all Americans have an equal opportunity to succeed. Delaney talked about equality, the economy, tensions with North Korea and several other issues Monday during the Friends of Scouting 2013 Community Campaign Breakfast at the Academy Theater in downtown Hagerstown. “The only way to preserve (equality) is to make sure there is an environment where people have opportunities,” the Democratic freshman congressman representing Maryland's 6th District said.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | December 19, 2011
Area residents had mixed reactions Monday to the news that North Korean leader Kim Jong Il had died of a heart attack at age 69. Ronald Mickelinc of Martinsburg, W.Va., said Kim's death works out much better for the people of North Korea. “(Kim) was a mass murderer and he was crazy,” Mickelinc said. “Maybe they won't be selling nuclear weapons to other countries, and maybe they'll start feeding their people.” Ty Jaouni of Hagerstown said that although things might change, North Korea could remain a problem.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | May 28, 2011
Editor's note: On June 25, 1950, communist forces of North Korea attacked South Korea to begin the Korean War. Early in the fighting, South Korean defenses were pushed back to a small pocket of resistance on the southeast coast of the country until United Nations forces, led by U.S. troops, mounted a successful counterattack at Inchon in September 1950. The war lasted until July 27, 1953, when both sides agreed to end hostilities. The country remains divided today. The U.S. Department of Defense estimates that 36,574 Americans were killed during the conflict.
NEWS
April 13, 2010
The question posted Friday on The Herald-Mail's Web site was: Do you think the nuclear arms pact between the U.S. and Russia signed Thursday is a first step toward making the world a safer place? Poll results: Yes: 218 votes (25 percent) No: 657 votes (75 percent) o "That's great. The U.S. and Russia will not have nukes. That makes me feel safe. Of course, it's been something like 50 years since the last time either of us used a nuke so that it hardly matters.
NEWS
August 11, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Obama administration moved Tuesday to freeze the assets of a North Korean bank accused of providing financial services to companies involved in Pyongyang's missile programs. The Treasury Department's action against Korea Kwangson Banking Corp., or KKBC, means any bank accounts or other financial assets found in the United States that belong to the firm are blocked. Americans also are prohibited from doing business with the bank. It is based in North Korea and has operated at least one overseas branch in Dandong, China.
NEWS
June 16, 2009
WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama said Tuesday that a nuclear-armed North Korea poses a "grave threat" to the world, and he vowed to end a cycle of allowing Pyongyang to create crises and then be rewarded with incentives to back down. "This is a pattern they've come to expect," Obama said. "We are going to break that pattern. " Standing alongside South Korean President Lee Myung-bak in the White House Rose Garden, Obama said they agreed that a new U.N. resolution seeking to halt North Korea's development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles must be fully enforced.
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