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NEWS
June 29, 1999
What does the "D" in D-Day stand for? The "D" stands for day. And yes, that means it translates to Day-Day. D and H designate the day and hour on which a combat attack is to begin. According to an article in The Stars and Stripes, the first known use of the designation was for a World War I operation at St.-Mihiel, France. But the most commonly known D-Day, of course, is June 6, 1944, when allied forces invaded Normandy.
NEWS
June 20, 2012
Guy Whidden was guest speaker at the Marine Corps League, Antietam Detachment's monthly meeting at the VFW in Hagerstown on June 5. Whidden, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, shared his experiences and answered questions from local Marines before the detachment's regular meeting. Whidden parachuted into Normandy as part of the D-Day invasion of June 1944. He also jumped again into Holland as part of Operation Market-Garden. On June 6, 1994, as one of a few select D-Day veterans cleared to jump, Whidden again jumped into Normandy during the 50th anniversary observances.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | August 2, 1998
D-Day veteran James R. Cochran of Boonsboro won't go see the movie "Saving Private Ryan," which depicts the bloody reality of the June 6, 1944 invasion of Normandy, France. "I would hate to see it over again," said Cochran, who doesn't even like to attend military funerals because he's heard Taps too often in his 75 years. --cont from news -- Cochran was a sergeant for Hagerstown's Company B, 115th Infantry, 29th Division, part of the second wave of infantry to hit the beach that day. "When you see your buddies, their stomachs ripped open and laying on the hillsides.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | May 28, 2000
HALFWAY - World War II veterans Jack Shriver and Richard Flook remember the waves lapping over barbed wire booby traps. cont. from front page They remember holding their rifles high while wading through cold water to reach Omaha beach in Normandy soon after their fellow American soldiers stormed the shore on D-Day. They remember the floating bodies and the mine-filled marshes - even if they don't want to. "I don't like to think much about the war," said Shriver, 77. "I've got better things to dream about.
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | June 6, 2004
HAGERSTOWN It was, in Gulf War parlance, the mother of all gambles. The sheer enormity and audacity of the battle plan prompted British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to dub it "Operation Overlord. " In southern England, the 101st Airborne prepared to embark on the operation's first objective: Breaching Hitler's Atlantic wall by gaining a foothold on the coast of the Normandy region of western France. The date was June 5, 1944. Guy Whidden, a future Hagerstown resident, posed for a photograph with a few of his comrades.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | August 15, 2006
Commentary People who are wondering what is wrong with today's armed services need only look as far as the U.S. Army, which last week said it was dumping a proposal to turn Fort Belvoir, Va., into a military-styled theme park. According to The Washington Post, the Army was approached by Universal Studios with the idea of a public-private partnership with the Army to build an amusement park around stuff like simulated paratrooper jumps and tank rides. Once word leaked out, however, the Army was in full retreat, allowing that about as far as it was willing to go in redeveloping the fort was a "hotel and conference center.
NEWS
December 7, 1998
By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Francis M. Kolb was 18 years old when he pulled bloated bodies out of the water at Normandy seven days after D-Day. Hundreds had washed up on shore on the days following the Allied invasion of Europe, he said. [cont. from news page ] Kolb, 73, of Martinsburg, was assigned to a graves registration squad in World War II. It was his job to pick up soldiers killed in battle, or whatever was left of them, identify them and then bury them.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | March 23, 2013
Josef “Chris” Bikle was just waiting for a nice spring day so he could sit on the porch of his Boonsboro home with his daughter-in-law, Lisha Bikle. Even though he had been living at the Village at Robinwood for about three years, his family kept his home so he could return to it and reconnect to his roots. He and his wife of 62 years, Nancy, had lived there since 1965. After her death in 2009 and after Joe had fallen at home, the move was necessary. Joe was of the generation shaped by growing up in the Depression years, working with the family fruit business and serving his country during World War II. As typical of veterans of his era, he rarely talked about his war experiences, that is until a trip to France with two buddies - Ken Wade and Frank Lum - after the 50th anniversary of D-Day.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | November 10, 2000
WWII veteran returns to Normandy A sentimental visit to Normandy, France, prompted Hagerstown native Jack Stoeber to dig out the yellowed newspaper articles and the black and white photographs he "never talked about. " The World War II veteran confronted the faded pictures of Nazi generals, prisoners of war, U.S. Army comrades and himself as a uniformed 19-year-old for the first time in more than 50 years in September as he prepared to embark on the return trip to Normandy.
NEWS
June 5, 2009
LA CAMBE, France (AP) -- Americans and Germans who were bitter enemies during the D-Day invasion of France shared stories and moments of silence at a Normandy ceremony Friday, joining together to honor those who perished in the epochal World War II beach landings. They held their poignant, low-key ceremony at the German cemetery at La Cambe a day before an international commemoration nearby, led by President Barack Obama, to mark 65 years since Allied forces landed on Normandy's shores.
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OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | March 23, 2013
Josef “Chris” Bikle was just waiting for a nice spring day so he could sit on the porch of his Boonsboro home with his daughter-in-law, Lisha Bikle. Even though he had been living at the Village at Robinwood for about three years, his family kept his home so he could return to it and reconnect to his roots. He and his wife of 62 years, Nancy, had lived there since 1965. After her death in 2009 and after Joe had fallen at home, the move was necessary. Joe was of the generation shaped by growing up in the Depression years, working with the family fruit business and serving his country during World War II. As typical of veterans of his era, he rarely talked about his war experiences, that is until a trip to France with two buddies - Ken Wade and Frank Lum - after the 50th anniversary of D-Day.
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NEWS
June 20, 2012
Guy Whidden was guest speaker at the Marine Corps League, Antietam Detachment's monthly meeting at the VFW in Hagerstown on June 5. Whidden, 502nd Parachute Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, shared his experiences and answered questions from local Marines before the detachment's regular meeting. Whidden parachuted into Normandy as part of the D-Day invasion of June 1944. He also jumped again into Holland as part of Operation Market-Garden. On June 6, 1994, as one of a few select D-Day veterans cleared to jump, Whidden again jumped into Normandy during the 50th anniversary observances.
NEWS
June 5, 2009
LA CAMBE, France (AP) -- Americans and Germans who were bitter enemies during the D-Day invasion of France shared stories and moments of silence at a Normandy ceremony Friday, joining together to honor those who perished in the epochal World War II beach landings. They held their poignant, low-key ceremony at the German cemetery at La Cambe a day before an international commemoration nearby, led by President Barack Obama, to mark 65 years since Allied forces landed on Normandy's shores.
NEWS
by TIM ROWLAND | August 15, 2006
Commentary People who are wondering what is wrong with today's armed services need only look as far as the U.S. Army, which last week said it was dumping a proposal to turn Fort Belvoir, Va., into a military-styled theme park. According to The Washington Post, the Army was approached by Universal Studios with the idea of a public-private partnership with the Army to build an amusement park around stuff like simulated paratrooper jumps and tank rides. Once word leaked out, however, the Army was in full retreat, allowing that about as far as it was willing to go in redeveloping the fort was a "hotel and conference center.
NEWS
By TAMELA BAKER | June 6, 2004
HAGERSTOWN It was, in Gulf War parlance, the mother of all gambles. The sheer enormity and audacity of the battle plan prompted British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to dub it "Operation Overlord. " In southern England, the 101st Airborne prepared to embark on the operation's first objective: Breaching Hitler's Atlantic wall by gaining a foothold on the coast of the Normandy region of western France. The date was June 5, 1944. Guy Whidden, a future Hagerstown resident, posed for a photograph with a few of his comrades.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | November 10, 2000
WWII veteran returns to Normandy A sentimental visit to Normandy, France, prompted Hagerstown native Jack Stoeber to dig out the yellowed newspaper articles and the black and white photographs he "never talked about. " The World War II veteran confronted the faded pictures of Nazi generals, prisoners of war, U.S. Army comrades and himself as a uniformed 19-year-old for the first time in more than 50 years in September as he prepared to embark on the return trip to Normandy.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | May 28, 2000
HALFWAY - World War II veterans Jack Shriver and Richard Flook remember the waves lapping over barbed wire booby traps. cont. from front page They remember holding their rifles high while wading through cold water to reach Omaha beach in Normandy soon after their fellow American soldiers stormed the shore on D-Day. They remember the floating bodies and the mine-filled marshes - even if they don't want to. "I don't like to think much about the war," said Shriver, 77. "I've got better things to dream about.
NEWS
June 29, 1999
What does the "D" in D-Day stand for? The "D" stands for day. And yes, that means it translates to Day-Day. D and H designate the day and hour on which a combat attack is to begin. According to an article in The Stars and Stripes, the first known use of the designation was for a World War I operation at St.-Mihiel, France. But the most commonly known D-Day, of course, is June 6, 1944, when allied forces invaded Normandy.
NEWS
December 7, 1998
By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer photo: JOE CROCETTA / staff photographer MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - Francis M. Kolb was 18 years old when he pulled bloated bodies out of the water at Normandy seven days after D-Day. Hundreds had washed up on shore on the days following the Allied invasion of Europe, he said. [cont. from news page ] Kolb, 73, of Martinsburg, was assigned to a graves registration squad in World War II. It was his job to pick up soldiers killed in battle, or whatever was left of them, identify them and then bury them.
NEWS
By LAURA ERNDE | August 2, 1998
D-Day veteran James R. Cochran of Boonsboro won't go see the movie "Saving Private Ryan," which depicts the bloody reality of the June 6, 1944 invasion of Normandy, France. "I would hate to see it over again," said Cochran, who doesn't even like to attend military funerals because he's heard Taps too often in his 75 years. --cont from news -- Cochran was a sergeant for Hagerstown's Company B, 115th Infantry, 29th Division, part of the second wave of infantry to hit the beach that day. "When you see your buddies, their stomachs ripped open and laying on the hillsides.
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