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By BOB PARASILITI | bobp@herald-mail.com | February 10, 2013
Sometimes, it all comes down to how you look at things. Every set of circumstances can be viewed from different angles, and there are many different opinions about those circumstances, views and angles. For example, it is said that “the squeaky wheel gets the grease” - which implies he who complains the loudest usually gets his way to shut him up. That's a huge concept in my business. If anyone complains, newspapers either change, investigate or report on something to resolve the injustice.
NEWS
May 4, 2004
WAYNESBORO, Pa. - The Washington Township Supervisors heard a complaint at their Monday night meeting from John and Sherry Welsh of Mentzer Gap Road about noise created by public address systems used by athletic teams, churches and other groups who use the township's Pine Hill Park. The couple, whose home is near the entrance to the park, said they had to call police on three occasions last year because of the noise. "I don't mind the kids yelling and screaming, but adults don't need PA systems," John Welsh said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | July 19, 2008
View the Monster Jam slideshow. WASHINGTON COUNTY - Loud, growling monster trucks wowed the crowd Friday at Hagerstown Speedway. Even the names of the trucks - El Toro Loco, Stone Crusher - were intimidating. The trucks ooze muscles and machismo. Each is about 11 feet high and 12 feet wide, weighs more than 9,000 pounds, and uses tires at least 66 inches high and 43 inches wide, according to a Monster Jam fact sheet. As the pumped-up trucks screamed around the dirt track, the PA announcer yelled with excitement and thousands of people in the stands, including many children, roared, adding to the din. Several fans said Friday that noise is part of the experience, but some, particularly parents, looked for ways to minimize it. Shaun Rose of Hagerstown bought two pairs of ear plugs from a vendor.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | May 7, 2006
WAYNESBORO, Pa. It's a simple correlation, they say, that when the weather gets warmer, the vehicle windows go down and the level of noise from stereos goes up. That noise briefly morphed into the sound of a freight train as Nancy Sheffler spoke last week while at her business on East Main Street. "It's not as bad as it used to be," she said as the rumble dissipated inside Sheffler's Uniform Shop. Nerves don't seem to be as rattled as windows in the 10,000-person borough that late last summer adopted an ordinance giving local police the authority to file charges if stereos can be heard within 50 feet.
NEWS
January 7, 1999
By DAN KULIN / Staff Writer photo: RICHARD T. MEAGHER / staff photographer Downtown Hagerstown is going to the birds ... again. Every October, as many as 100,000 crows come to roost in the woods near the corner of Wesel and Burhans boulevards, said Mike Heyser, the city building inspector. "If you go out there and clap your hands it almost sounds like a helicopter taking off," said Heyser, one of the city employees who respond to residents' complaints about the birds.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 18, 2011
A Capital Camps & Retreat Center official urged the Washington Township (Pa.) Supervisors on Monday to approve a conditional-use permit for a new conference center. David Phillips, Capital Camps' president and CEO, told the board during a public hearing that the new center and its 42 overnight rooms would allow the camp to better accommodate adults whose organizations, churches, temples or schools host large-group events. “This really upgrades us in our capacity to handle adult guests,” Phillips said.
NEWS
June 6, 2003
Sound is expressed in decibels (dB) on a scale that gets geometrically louder as the numbers increase. Researchers with the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders say prolonged exposure to any noise above 90 dB can cause gradual hearing loss. Regular exposure of more than one minute to noises of 110 dB or louder risks permanent hearing loss. 180 - Rocket launch 140 - Rock concerts, firecrackers, jet engine at takeoff 120 - Snowmobiles, ambulance siren, loud cars 110 - Chainsaws 100 - Woodshop background noise 98 - Power drill 96 - Farm tractor 90 - Motorcycle, lawnmower, hairdryer 80 - City traffic noise, phone ringing 60 - Normal conversation 40 - Refrigerator humming 20 to 30 - Whispered voice 0 - Threshold of normal hearing
NEWS
April 19, 2001
Letters to the Editor 4/19 Raceway rules remain unsettled To the editor: During the past few months, CARE and Summit Point Raceway have been in negotiations regarding noise generated from the raceway and plans for expansion. At this time, negotiations are completed and CARE would like to inform the community of the outcome, and plans for the future. CARE requested that noise decibel levels be reduced from current 112 (cars) to 140 (explosions) decibels, to 65 decibels.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | May 14, 2003
scottb@herald-mail.com Some residents living near Municipal Stadium were awakened after midnight Saturday by what resident John McCune on Tuesday said sounded like "booming aerial bombs" but actually were fireworks shot off after a Hagerstown Suns game. On Saturday morning, resident Mildred Dieterich called the Suns to say she had trouble sleeping because of the noise. "I just thought it was a little inconsiderate," she said Tuesday. In response to a complaint from McCune, of Radcliff Avenue, the City of Hagerstown will explore whether an ordinance is needed to prevent such noise from the stadium after a certain time, City Administrator Bruce Zimmerman said Tuesday.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 10, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The Jefferson County Commission on Thursday revisited the issues of noise and how to control it. A group of homeowners from the Glenn Meadows subdivision near Shepherdstown, W.Va., told the commissioners about a problem they are having with late-night partying in their neighborhood. Glenn Meadows resident Tim Pownell said people at a house in the subdivision often have parties late into the night, sometimes as late as 3 a.m. People were partying at the house last Friday and Saturday, Pownell said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | September 3, 2013
Hagerstown officials are considering changing the city's noise ordinance which has not been updated since 1996. Kathleen A. Maher, the city's planning director, said Tuesday that the proposed changes were needed to clearly state what entities enforce the ordinance and clean up wording that was considered confusing.  “It makes it clearer what the city's intent is,” Maher told the Hagerstown City Council during a work session at City Hall. New provisions include adding a statement of intent, which was not included previously, and clear definitions of contained terms such as “excessive noise,” “plainly audible” and “day time,” according to a memorandum to the five-member council.
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NEWS
August 12, 2013
Funkstown Mayor Paul N. Crampton Jr. said Monday night that the town will continue to research a possible noise ordinance, but problems at a local restaurant and bar that prompted the proposal have diminished. Crampton's comments came after a mayor and Funkstown Town Council meeting. Washington County Sheriff Douglas W. Mullendore had contacted town officials to express concerns about the ability for deputies to enforce the noise and loitering proposals. Mullendore recommended that the town contact Maryland officials about the state's Environmental Noise Act of 1974.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | August 11, 2013
Washington County Sheriff Douglas W. Mullendore said he's recommending Funkstown's Town Council not pursue a loitering ordinance, and seek advice from a state agency about addressing noise complaints in town. Mayor Paul N. Crampton Jr. withdrew proposed noise and loitering ordinances from the council's July agenda at the request of Mullendore, who had concerns about the ability to enforce both proposed laws. The sheriff's office is the enforcement agency for the town. The mayor and town council will discuss the town's proposed noise and loitering ordinances at its at 7 p.m. meeting Monday, Aug. 12, at Town Hall, Town Clerk/Treasurer Brenda Haynes said.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 8, 2013
Mayor Paul N. Crampton Jr. withdrew proposed noise and loitering ordinances from the town council's agenda Monday night at the request of the Washington County sheriff, who wants prosecutors to review the proposals to see if they are enforceable. “They can't just create ordinances without running it by us to see whether it's even enforceable or not,” Sheriff Douglas W. Mullendore said in a telephone interview after the Funkstown Town Council meeting. “They can pass ordinances all day long, but if they're not enforceable, they're just a waste of paper,” he said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 21, 2013
Voices filled Five Forks Church north of Waynesboro on Sunday during a visit from the 160-member National Christian Choir. Audience members filled the auditorium and spilled into the hallway for the performance featuring contemporary Christian music, hymn arrangements, gospel songs and a cappella moments. “It's more of a worship service rather than a concert where the audience sits detached,” said Kathy Bowman, director of music and ministries for the choir. Started in 1984, The National Christian Choir rehearses weekly in Rockville, Md., during the school year.
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | March 2, 2013
They've been called “Angels in Harlem.” And it's a pretty appropriate tag. Using their heavenly, note-blending voices, members of the Harlem Gospel Choir lift the spirit, touch the soul and share the joy of their faith. And, hallelujah, they are helping to preserve a form of music that has spoken to audiences beyond sacred places - influencing jazz, blues, soul, country and rock. For more than two decades, the Harlem Gospel Choir has shared its high-energy, hand-clapping, inspirational performances with people all over the world.
LIFESTYLE
February 24, 2013
The Joyful Noise concert series will present “The Shamrock and The Daffodil,” a program of songs, poetry and legends from Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Christ Reformed Church in Hagerstown will present the concert Sunday, March 10, at 3 p.m. The program is a celebration of Saint David's Day, which is March 1, and Saint Patrick's Day, which is March 17. It will feature legends of the saints, as well as poetry by William Yeats, Robert Burns and others, as well as music. The choirs of Christ Reformed Church and their soloist and readers will join harpist Sally Lay in traditional songs, such as “Danny Boy,” “Comin' Thro' the Rye” and “Blue Bells of Scotland,” as well as some lesser-known but traditional songs.
SPORTS
By BOB PARASILITI | bobp@herald-mail.com | February 10, 2013
Sometimes, it all comes down to how you look at things. Every set of circumstances can be viewed from different angles, and there are many different opinions about those circumstances, views and angles. For example, it is said that “the squeaky wheel gets the grease” - which implies he who complains the loudest usually gets his way to shut him up. That's a huge concept in my business. If anyone complains, newspapers either change, investigate or report on something to resolve the injustice.
NEWS
December 5, 2012
A booming noise heard just after 9 a.m. Wednesday was the explosion of a large shop air compressor at a farm off Paradise Church Road, but no injuries or structural damage occurred, a Washington County Emergency Communications dispatcher said. The explosion was reported by several callers, the first at 9:08 a.m., the dispatcher said. The compressor was on a farm at 14014 Paradise Church Road, she said.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
Hagerstown Community College's Robinwood Players will perform Michael Frayn's “Noises Off” from Friday, Nov. 30, through Sunday, Dec. 2, at Kepler Theater. “Noises Off” is a “play within a play” and tells the story of an acting group preparing to perform a terrible play called “Nothing's On.” Show times are 8 p.m. Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. A matinee performance will be held at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2. Admission costs $10, but HCC students, staff and faculty can attend for free.
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