Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsNiagara Movement
IN THE NEWS

Niagara Movement

NEWS
February 26, 2002
The public is invited to attend a community presentation, "The Maryland Campaign, The Niagara Movement and Options to Amend the Park's Boundary," sponsored by the National Park Service. In 2000, Congress directed the National Park Service to conduct extensive educational outreach on the Civil War and African-American history in and around Harpers Ferry, W.Va., and to explain options for amending the park's boundary in order to preserve this history. The scheduled meetings are the result of this Congressional request and will be held at the following locations and times: - Tuesday, March 5, 7:30 p.m. at C.W. Shipley Elementary School, Harpers Ferry.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 5, 2000
Hubert Sumlin Blues Heritage Concert with David Bennett Cohen Friday, April 7, 7:30 p.m. Cliffside Inn Ballroom U.S. 340 Harpers Ferry, W.Va. Advance tickets are $12 for adults, $10 for students and children. Tickets at the door are $15. To purchase tickets, call 1-800-821-5206 or 1-304-535-6881. Proceeds from the concert will support public education and interpretation of African-American history at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, and specifically, the Niagara Centennial events.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
West Virginia Sen. Robert C. Byrd said during Thursday's opening ceremonies of the 100th anniversary celebration of the Niagara Movement that the effort changed history. The opening ceremonies kicked off a weekend of events commemorating the centennial of the effort that eventually became the NAACP. See Friday's Herald-Mail newspapers for the full story.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | January 9, 1999
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County can lay claim to some historic moments in black history, including the Niagara Movement in Harpers Ferry in 1906, which laid the foundation for the NAACP. But now, officials are piecing together the history of another black organization that dates 21 years earlier. In 1885, Charles Town became the home to a local chapter of a national self-help organization known as the Grand United Order of Gallilean Fishermen. The group, which had 205 "tabernacles" throughout the East, was formed to set up banking, insurance, real estate and endowment services for blacks.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|