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Meg Partington | May 14, 2011
I love to clean. I've been a neat-nik since I was a little girl, when I took great pleasure in keeping my bedroom spotless. I suppose that's an incredibly uncool confession to make. As an adult, scouring baseboards and tackling grime have become great stress relievers. Lately, I've been doing a lot of spring cleaning at home. It's a rite of seasonal passage, ridding the windowsills of months' worth of winter dirt buildup and tossing the bodies of dead stink bugs outside.
NEWS
Lisa Prejean | June 16, 2011
As my daughter and I were working in the kitchen earlier this week, that evening's news played in the background. Our dinner preparations were accompanied by commentary on Rep. Anthony Weiner's behavior. We listened as a reporter stated that the White House had called Weiner's behavior "inappropriate" and "a distraction. " I would tend to call it "pompous. " How dare a politician act in such a self-important manner that he would ignore common decency? What kind of a man sends sexually suggestive messages and photos of himself to women?
OPINION
August 19, 2013
I love fights between unlikely participants. You come to expect fights between NASCAR drivers (however trumped up), rap musicians and anyone who comes within 20 yards of Bill O'Reilly. But these fights are boring and predictable. The real fun occurs when two unlikely combatants go at it, like two organic gardeners arguing over the proper internal temperature for compost. And there's a good one brewing between the cities of Washington and New York over the latter's controversial “stop-and-frisk” policy.
NEWS
January 1, 2007
An index of Hagerstown-area newspapers from the Civil War era is available at www.washcolibrary.org/newsIndex . Eleven counties in the Tri-State area are covered by the Herald of Freedom and Torch Light, Herald and Torch Light, Hagerstown Mail and Maryland Free Press from 1860 to 1865. In addition to articles, the index catalogs obituaries, advertisements, legal notices and marriage announcements. The indexed newspapers are available on microfilm at the Washington County Free Library.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | April 15, 2007
A 26-year project to index local historic newspapers is already helping people across the country with research, including tracking down their family history, said Carol Appenzellar, project manager. The Civil War years, 1860 to 1865, of the Historic Newspaper Indexing Project became searchable online at www.washcolibrary.org/newsindex in August 2006, said Appenzellar, who works for Washington County Free Library. Since a major marketing push for the Web site in December 2006, more than 30 people from as far away as California have requested articles that they found with the index, Appenzellar said.
NEWS
by BILL KOHLER | January 25, 2004
As I was dusting off my 1980s "Hail to the Redskins" championship videos, sweaters and polo shirts last week, I wondered - How could Joe Gibbs come back after a 12-year layoff and coach professional football? Things haven't changed that much, have they? Professional football players for the most part are as overpaid and self-righteous as they were in 1992, when Gibbs last coached the Washington Redskins. The object of the game remains to outscore the opponent and win the game - and Gibbs did that at a nearly 70 percent clip for a dozen years.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | April 22, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY-If it weren't for the Civil War, this newspaper story might be anonymous. The "byline," as newspaper authorship is known, was a legacy of Civil War coverage, historian Brayton Harris said Saturday. Joseph Hooker, a Union general, made reporters "sign" their stories because of concerns about sensitive military information being printed, Harris said. Harris, a retired U.S. Navy captain living in Kansas, spoke at the Antietam National Battlefield visitors' center on Saturday in conjunction with an exhibit on Civil War coverage in Hagerstown newspapers.
NEWS
By BILL KOHLER | May 25, 2008
A funny thing happened on the way to the Washington Post. I had it all figured out 20 years ago: Work a couple of jobs at smaller papers and find out what they know. I'll make some contacts, work my beats, get some killer clips and I'll be covering the Redskins or Wizards (or Bullets as they were known back then) by the time I'm 29 or 30. A funny thing happened on the way to RFK Stadium. This month marks 20 years since I graduated with a journalism degree from Shippensburg University.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
August 19, 2013
I love fights between unlikely participants. You come to expect fights between NASCAR drivers (however trumped up), rap musicians and anyone who comes within 20 yards of Bill O'Reilly. But these fights are boring and predictable. The real fun occurs when two unlikely combatants go at it, like two organic gardeners arguing over the proper internal temperature for compost. And there's a good one brewing between the cities of Washington and New York over the latter's controversial “stop-and-frisk” policy.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | July 14, 2013
As Mont Alto residents filled a time capsule Sunday afternoon, Mayor John Esser mused that the people who open it in 100 years will probably not be familiar with newspapers and printed books. He said they might hardly recognize iPads. “In our time, we've seen advancements in cars and technology. Likewise, we can't even fathom what it'll look like in 100 years,” Esser said before the time capsule was lowered into the ground across from borough hall. Burying the time capsule marked the end of a three-day celebration of the municipality's 100th year.
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | June 6, 2013
Reports that Fredericksburg, Va., may be making a play to attract the Hagerstown Suns reached a fever pitch Thursday, when Suns majority owner Bruce Quinn was quoted in a Virginia newspaper saying he's going “full-speed ahead” with moving the team there. Quinn's comments appeared in The Free Lance-Star, which quoted him as saying he would move the team if the Fredericksburg City Council approves construction of a new multipurpose baseball stadium. In an email Thursday afternoon, Quinn told The Herald-Mail that he has not yet given up on getting something done in Hagerstown, “However, it's been like square-dancing in snow skis.” Hagerstown Councilman Lewis C. Metzner, who earlier this week hinted that the city might be close to forging its own deal to keep the Suns, said he was not surprised by the news.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | April 24, 2013
Siriki Diabate left his four daughters, parents and three siblings behind in 2005 when he was forced to flee his native Ivory Coast after suffering a terrific beating by thugs who left him for dead. He was working for a local newspaper at the time, writing stories exposing the national government's practice of persecuting the Malinki tribal people in the country's northern region, he said. “I am a Malinki,” said Diabate, who was 32 at the time he was beaten. The men who beat him were unofficial paramilitary goons hired by the government to harass Malinki activists, Diabate said in a recent interview.
NEWS
Linda Murray | Around West Hagerstown | February 13, 2013
Thursday is Valentine's Day. And yes, my thoughts of love are of my family and friends, but I must confess that I also love reading The Herald-Mail newspaper. Every morning, I start my day with a big mug of coffee and The Herald Mail. I even get up on work mornings an hour early just so I have time to enjoy it. Once I get to work, I see the benefits of the Newspapers in Education Program. The Herald-Mail donates newspapers every week to schools in the county, which are great teaching tools for educators.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 3, 2013
Two historic Charles Town landmarks - the Old Opera House, a community theater, and the Spirit of Jefferson and Farmer's Advocate, a weekly newspaper - crossed paths recently in a property transfer. The theater company, at 204 and 206 N. George St., bought the newspaper building at 210 N. George St. When renovations are complete in the fall, the theater will have more space for stage productions, plus dance, music and acting education programs. There will be ample room for costume, prop and scenery storage, said Steven Brewer, managing and artistic director.
OPINION
December 3, 2012
“I read in the newspaper on Monday, somebody asked where they could drop off used newspapers, who would like to have them, to use for various reasons, and said that they wanted to know where. I wanted to call in and say that (Promise Animal League) will use used newspapers if you drop them off. Go to Funkstown, outside of Funkstown, Route 40, and that's where they're in the back of the Next Dimensions restaurant parking lot.” - Clear Spring “In reference to the Friday, Nov. 23 (column)
LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | November 28, 2012
It was the start of a new school year in 1897 when friends of Virginia O'Hanlon told her the unthinkable: Santa Claus was a myth. Unwilling to accept such a notion, the 8-year-old wrote a letter to The New York Sun with the simple inquiry: “Please tell me the truth. Is there a Santa Claus?” The letter was answered by veteran journalist Francis Pharcellus Church, who brightened the day of all true believers with the simple answer, “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus.” It can be argued that no editorial has had such a lasting impact, despite being written in fewer than 500 words.
EDUCATION
November 4, 2012
Editor's note: Three student reporters for The Northside Eagle News, the school newspaper at Fountaindale Elementary School, attended the first STARS award ceremony of the school year and reported on the event.  The following is compiled from the articles of Joshua Brooks, Dayanna Trujillo and Mae Weisenmiller: On Oct. 16, Fountaindale Elementary School held its first STARS award ceremony of the school year.  The student reporters...
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | June 9, 2012
Washington County's economy is showing new strength, with household and business spending on the rise for nearly a year, according to a study byTheHerald-Mail. But whether the momentum will continue amid rising economic uncertainties across the globe is a big question, a regional economist said last week. “One might look at the (local spending) data and conclude we have turned the corner. That doesn't mean we might not do another U-turn” back into the recession, said Anirban Basu, chairman and chief executive officer of Sage Policy Group Inc., a Baltimore economic and policy consulting firm.
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